PowerPoint and Presenting Stuff

Thoughts and impressions of happenings in the world of PowerPoint and presentations. Explore, share and comment!

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes
PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary

« Older Entries «



Friday, October 20, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:45 am

Disagreement is nothing to be fearful of – it’s an inevitable part of working within a business team. However, it’s essential it is done constructively.

When teams are working together effectively they use disagreeing and supporting verbal behaviors in equal amounts. Here, disagreeing is defined as “making a clear statement of disagreement with someone else’s statement, idea or approach, or raising objections.”

Supporting, on the other hand, is “a clear statement of agreement or support for a person or their statement, opinion, idea or approach.”

Working through disagreement typically leads to greater understanding and better quality solutions. The best relationships are built on the ability to manage tensions as much as the desire to support one another.

Unfortunately, some people show their disagreement by ‘leaking’ emotionally; displaying clear, non-verbal indications of discomfort. This can be seen, by others, as devious or even downright rude.

Disagree Constructively

Others can be unhelpfully vocal, labeling their disagreements which is a sure-fire way to create further dissent. Labelled disagreeing might sound like: ‘I disagree with that because…’ and then the speaker goes on to give the reasons. This can be interpreted as a threat or an attack leaving people stunned into silence, retreating or reacting immediately. There’s a dearth of listening and an absence of exploring the various arguments.

Between these two extremes lie four more constructive alternatives:

  1. Stating reasons before disagreeing,
  2. Testing Understanding,
  3. Giving Feelings, and
  4. Building

Sharing your reasons for disagreeing before declaring your position gives people missing information and a context, which can be used as a basis for exploration and deeper understanding. For example, a colleague suggests that Ilie Nastase is in the all-time top three tennis greats. Rather than label your disagreement you might say: ‘You can judge greatness in a number of ways, for example: longevity, impact, talent. I don’t think Nastase matches up on all those counts, compared with Borg or McEnroe.’ This allows others to understand the basis for your position and a more fruitful discussion can follow.

Testing Understanding is a verbal behavior which seeks to test an assumption or check whether a previous contribution has been understood. For example, Manager One says: ‘Nick has been a consistently high performer across all aspects of his work.’ Rather than directly disagree, Manager Two might say: ‘Does that include safety?’ or ‘High across all three categories – core work, projects and safety?’ His questioning invites all those present to reflect and consider the answer. It also drives up the level of clarity in the meeting, ensuring everyone is on the same page.

The third option is called ‘Giving Feelings’, which is an expression of how you feel about what’s happening in any given interaction.  For example, ‘I’m feeling uncomfortable that we’re focusing on just one option’ (versus ‘I disagree with your idea’.)

Finally, Building; which is defined as: ‘Extending or developing a proposal made by another person’. Building requires us to listen to what’s being said and demands that we let go of our own sense of ‘rightness’.

If you disagree with an idea you can use Building to shape the suggestion in a slightly different direction:

Susan: Can we focus the conference on breaking down silos?

Tony: We could have representatives of each function in every break-out group as a way of addressing that in a practical way, which would allow us to broaden the theme.

Of the four alternatives to Disagreeing, Building is the most skillful and the one likely to have the most positive impact.

Don’t be fearful of disagreeing, instead build variety, using the four behaviors above, into your behavioral repertoire.


Ally YatesAlly Yates is author of Utter Confidence: How what you say and do influences your effectiveness in business and an expert on Behaviour Analysis and the interactions that define us. She combines a deep understanding of people and how to achieve results, based on her many years’ experience working with large corporate clients around the world.

Since 2000 Ally has been working as an independent consultant, facilitator, trainer, and coach. She has collaborated with international business schools and has received national and international training awards.

You May Also Like: Are You a Pusher or a Puller? | Business Thrives on Interaction

Filed Under: Guest Posts
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Wednesday, October 18, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

Nancy AncowitzNancy Ancowitz is the author of Self-Promotion for Introverts®. As a presentation and career coach, she helps clients—introverts and extroverts alike—with vital career-building and leadership skills. Nancy was recognized for running successful marketing programs for a multibillion-dollar business as a vice president at JP Morgan Chase & Co.; at Citibank, she received an outstanding achievement award for her innovations in creating marketing proposals for international clients. She teaches at New York University. A blogger for Psychology Today and Salary.com, her work been covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, WABC-TV, and O, The Oprah Magazine.

Carl KissinCarl Kissin has performed more than 4,000 shows for the renowned improv comedy troupe Chicago City Limits. He has been the company’s head writer and director of their National Touring Company. As an instructor, he has taught improv team-building workshops, created customized shows, and improvised for more than one-hundred Fortune 500 companies. He would be delighted to do the same for any groups and companies in India. Carl has performed his own material on “The Today Show,” and played the character Glenn in Oliver Stone’s movie Talk Radio. He has written book and lyrics for two award-winning musicals.

Geetesh: What does improv mean, and how can it help in the workplace?

Carl: Improv means listening and responding on the spot. It means being nimble enough to adjust in the moment when you don’t get the questions or responses you might expect. It means thinking anew even on a topic you know well, so that you personalize interactions to fit your audience — whether that be one person or a crowd.

Nancy: Bringing this into the business arena, think of a time when you or someone you know shared an idea at a meeting that got shot down. Yet, if others had entertained the idea with the improv concept of “yes-and” — accepting what someone else puts forth (YES) and adding on to it (AND), it might have led to something wonderful.

Improvisation is the single most valuable skill I’ve learned in my career. Learning to speak on the spot has been incredibly helpful at business meetings, negotiations, and innumerable public speaking scenarios. It’s also a vital skill for introverts, who like me, prefer composing our thoughts in our heads before we speak.

Carl: People mistakenly think that improv means being “fast on your feet,” but taking a moment to evaluate a situation and coming up with an excellent response is far superior to instantly saying something ill-considered. By being confident in silence instead of apologetic, you can buy yourself extra time that you can use wisely.

Geetesh: The two of you recently started collaborating on presentations and a webinar on the topic of thinking on your feet for business audiences. Can you share a story about how your approaches to improv have helped individuals you’ve worked with?

Nancy: I was working with a client with a need for transparent relationships with his co-workers. It’s important to him to share a little about one another’s personal lives as a foundation for building trust. Yet his boss is a private person, and that frustrated him. He realized he was taking things too personally and adjusted his expectations. By instead “meeting her where she is” — an improv skill that uses observation and active listening — he is now more patient with successfully building that relationship.

Carl: Yes, your ability to target your audience, or really get to know their likes and dislikes, is essential. I worked with a client who was not fully fluent in English. By practicing person-to-person interactions and different ways of speaking to co-workers, he became much more comfortable at communicating. Our practice wasn’t a lot of business do’s and don’ts; it was play. At first, we acted silly to exercise the “improv muscle.” Then we tried different ways to bring out his personality. Then we toned down the silliness to be more appropriate for a corporate environment. But going on that journey was essential for him. Improv gives you techniques and permission to take risks.

Nancy: It also enables you to re-channel fears — whether it’s a fear of finding the right words, embarrassment, sweating, shaking, or being criticized — into the excitement of tackling something as life-affirming as speaking confidently on the spot. Remember that you have many contributions to make. And no one will know about them unless you speak up. So here’s to your success!

Filed Under: Interviews
Tagged as: , , ,

No Comments


Wednesday, October 18, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 am

If you use PowerPoint Online extensively, you will want to get more templates and Themes for PowerPoint. But did you know that Microsoft makes it quite easy for you to get these templates and Themes from within PowerPoint Online? Further, there’s no way to save and use these templates and Themes from within Powerpoint Online without downloading and uploading them on your own! We will explore how you can use these scenarios to your advantage in this article.

Get More Templates and Themes in PowerPoint Online

Explore how to get more templates and Themes in PowerPoint Online.

Filed Under: PowerPoint Online
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Tuesday, October 17, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 10:00 am

We begin with exploring creating multilingual presentations. Jude Barak talks about the minute details you should be aware of. Do you want to create a logo easily and quickly? DesignEvo lets you create logos online, and Henry Wong talks about how this online logo platform evolved. Deb Peretz discusses her session, which is part of this year’s Outstanding Presentation Workshop series.

PowerPoint Online users can learn about the Slides Pane and the Notes Pane. PowerPoint 2016 for Windows users can explore the Presentation Gallery, Ribbon and Tabs, and the Status Bar. Finally, do not miss the quotes, press releases, and templates of this week.

PowerPoint and Presenting News: October 17, 2017

Stay informed about updated tutorials and happenings related to PowerPoint and presenting.

You May Also Like: Transparent Pattern Fills in PowerPoint | Creating PowerPoint Outlines in Microsoft Word 2016 for Windows | Skyscraper PowerPoint Templates

Filed Under: Ezine
Tagged as: , , ,

No Comments


Monday, October 16, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

Dave ParadiDave Paradi helps corporate professionals use PowerPoint to visually communicate the messages in their data so they don’t overwhelm and confuse executives. He is one of sixteen people in North America recognized by Microsoft with the PowerPoint Most Valuable Professional Award for his contributions to the PowerPoint community. He has authored nine books on effective PowerPoint presentations and has written his newsletter every two weeks for over fifteen years. His website is www.ThinkOutsideTheSlide.com.

In this conversation, Dave discusses the results of his  The Annoying PowerPoint Survey 2017 survey.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: Interviews
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Monday, October 16, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 am

When you launch PowerPoint Online, it opens Presentation Gallery that provides you with a list of recently opened PowerPoint documents, and Themes and Templates to start a new presentation. You can also click the Open from OneDrive option to navigate your OneDrive folders so as to locate a PowerPoint file to open within PowerPoint Online. Other than OneDrive, PowerPoint Online also supports Dropbox as a cloud alternative. In this tutorial, we will explore adding Dropbox to PowerPoint Online’s Place locations.

Add Dropbox to PowerPoint Online

Explore how to add Dropbox as a Place in PowerPoint Online.

Filed Under: PowerPoint Online
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Thursday, October 12, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:45 am

Henry WongHenry Wong, the chief development officer of PearlMountain Limited, is a dedicated graphics and software development engineer with more than 7 years experience in senior software engineering skills. He enjoys the collaborative and communicative aspects of working in this position. Henry continuously researches and tries to find simple ways to develop easy-to-use graphical applications that can help others unleash their creativity.

In this conversation, Henry discusses DesignEvo, an online app that lets you create logos.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: Interviews
Tagged as: , , , ,

No Comments


Thursday, October 12, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 am

PowerPoint Online’s tri-paned interface has three regions: the Slides Pane, the Slide Area, and the Notes Pane. The Notes Pane is placed right below the Slide Area, as shown highlighted in red within Figure 1. The Notes Pane provides space to add speaker’s notes that can be so helpful to the presenter while presenting. You can also write any sort of information about the presentation or individual slide.

Notes Pane in PowerPoint Online

Learn about the Notes Pane in PowerPoint Online.

Filed Under: PowerPoint Online
Tagged as: , ,

No Comments


Wednesday, October 11, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

As an expert with broad experience in data collection and presentation, Jude Barak understands to what extent companies need data as a backup support. Collection and analysis of data and preparation for proper display are critical processes to the success of young and well-established companies alike. Based in Israel, Jude speaks 4 languages, which provides her with a broad perception on the importance of multilingual awareness. Jude is the owner of ExcelLeader.

In this conversation, Jude discusses creating multilingual presentations.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed Under: Interviews
Tagged as: , , , ,

1 Comment


Tuesday, October 10, 2017, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 10:00 am

In this issue, we feature the first post in our Possibilities series, which will explore both rare and frequent visited PowerPoint and presenting scenarios. In this first post, we look at the differences between static and dynamic presentations. We also feature Richard Goring from BrightCarbon, a presentations and eLearning agency. Richard discusses his upcoming webinar as part of the Outstanding Presentations Workshop 2017 series.

Continuing the series from last week, we explore creating PowerPoint outlines in Word 2008 for Mac and TextEdit. We then look at opening presentations from within PowerPoint Online on OneDrive. PowerPoint 2016 for Windows users can learn about the interface, while PowerPoint 2016 for Mac users can explore differences between text placeholders and text boxes, and learn about importing outlines. Finally, do not miss the quotes, press releases, and templates of this week.

PowerPoint and Eileen 1700620

Stay informed about updated tutorials and happenings related to PowerPoint and presenting.

Filed Under: Ezine
Tagged as: , , ,

No Comments


« Older Entries «




Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

© 2000-2017, Geetesh Bajaj - All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000