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Using the Pen and Highlighter Tools in Slide Show View in PowerPoint 2016

Tuesday, August 30, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



While presenting and interacting with your audience, annotation on a slide can play an important role -- and PowerPoint provides you with useful Pen and Highlighter tools that can change your static slide into a whiteboard upon which you can doodle and write! In this tutorial, we will learn how these tools can be helpful.



Learn how to use the Pen and Highlighter tools within Slide Show View in PowerPoint 2016.

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Monday, August 29, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST

Troy ChollarTroy Chollar is President and co-founder of TLC Creative Services, Inc., a graphic design studio team that specializes in presentation design and visual communication projects. He is very active in the PowerPoint and presentation community through his blog and a presentation industry podcast. He is a Microsoft MVP for PowerPoint, annually awarded since 2004, and has only missed one Presentation Summit since the inaugural event.

In this conversation, Troy discusses his sessions at the upcoming Presentation Summit 2016 series.

Geetesh: You are doing three sessions this year: Metamorphosis!, What’s on Your QAT? and PowerPoint and Video. What can audiences anticipate as takeaways from sessions on these important topics?

Troy: I am very excited about the session topics I have been asked to present this year!

The Morph transition (Metamorphosis!) is something my entire design team has been using non-stop since it was introduced. This transition is the best animation tool PowerPoint has. I have many client presentations to use as examples of Morph in use, and lots of tips and tricks for everyone to make this incredible new animation/transition tool a part of their project workflow.

What’s on your QAT? is one of the quick 20 minute sessions. I have compiled a fast-paced presentation on why to use the QAT, how to cheat and setup a custom QAT in under 3 minutes—and a comparison of QATs from several presentation designers. Anyone who spends time formatting slides will find this information valuable.

I am big a fan of integrating multimedia into presentations. For the PowerPoint and Video session, I am taking a more advanced approach. I am overviewing the technical gotchas like video formats, file sizes, resolution, and including my recommendations for each. But what I am really excited about is sharing some amazing example files showing great ways of integrating video into a presentation. Also, when to use a presentation to create a video is going to be a fun topic. Everyone should walk away with plenty of ideas on how much more can be done in PowerPoint than just add a video to a slide.

Geetesh: You are also doing a live episode of The Presentation Podcast, featuring Rick Altman, the host of the Summit. What sort of involvement do you expect from the audience during this recording? Do you have a message to share?

Troy: Yes, audience involvement is definitely part of the plan! And the message may be amazing —but that depends on the audience.

So the background is that all three of the co-hosts on The Presentation Podcast; myself, Nolan Haims, and Sandra Johnson, are going to be at The Presentation Summit. We talked about recording an episode with the three of us physically in the same room – something we have never done. Our design studios are scattered across the country and we meet virtually for the podcast. We asked Rick if the conference would let us do a recording somewhere. That expanded into doing a live audience recording. And that expanded into Rick graciously accepting an invitation to be on the host panel with us - and inviting all conference attendees to be guests on a special Presentation Summit episode. It is going to be amazing!

To make this opportunity happen, I am leveraging my live, corporate show site experience, and having some friends’ companies lend some additional audio equipment, and then doing a quick turn around edit to get the episode ready to drop the Tuesday after the conference close.

Everyone in the audience will be part of the podcast as we toss around a mic for an open Q&A time, which is the bulk of the session (and we are literally tossing the mic with the awesome mic enclosure called a CatchBox). We do have an outline for the episode, but after the first 15 minutes, the audience will be in charge of the episode conversation. So join us for a live podcast recording, think of a great presentation related question, and it definitely will be one of the most fun things we do all week!

Troy with the TLC Design Team
Troy with the TLC Design Team

See Also: Troy Chollar on Indezine

Presentation Summit 2016

What is the Presentation Summit?

For many years now, Rick Altman has been hosting the Presentation Summit, a highly popular event that is geared towards users of PowerPoint and other presentation platforms.

Date: October 23 to 26, 2016

Location: Green Valley Ranch, Las Vegas, United States

Register now!

Twitter Hashtag: Presum16

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Theme Fonts comprise a pair of font choices, one each for your slide titles (Heading font) and the other for everything else on your slides (Body font). You can use existing Theme Fonts available in PowerPoint or even create them on your own. Additionally, you can opt to edit existing Theme Font pairs (sets), as we will explore in this tutorial.



Learn how to edit Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2013.

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Friday, August 26, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST

Mike ParkinsonMike Parkinson (Microsoft MVP, CPP APMP Fellow) is an internationally recognized visual communication and presentation expert and a multi-published, award-winning author. He regularly contributes articles and conducts educational seminars to companies like Microsoft, Motorola, Dell, Xerox, and Lockheed Martin as well as at learning institutions, government agencies, and conferences around the world. Mike owns a design education company, Billion Dollar Graphics, a creative services firm, 24 Hour Company, and authored a successful visual communication book, Do-It-Yourself Billion Dollar Graphics.

In this conversation, Mike discusses his sessions at the upcoming Presentation Summit 2016 series.

Geetesh: You are doing at least three sessions at this year's Presentation Summit: Do-it-Yourself Graphics, Special Delivery, and Better Presenting through Psychology. Tell us more about these three diverse topics, and how will attendees benefit from your sessions?

Mike: Making and delivering great presentations requires a spectrum of skills such as design theory, rendering skills, storytelling, and an understanding of how audiences learn and are influenced. These three workshops tap into the key skill sets professionals use to create powerful presentations for companies, learning institutions, and government agencies.

Do-It-Yourself Graphics shares step-by-step instructions to make professional PowerPoint graphics. Special Delivery shows attendees how to deliver engaging presentations. Better Presenting through Psychology uses the latest behavioral psychology to improve understanding, recollections, adoption, and persuasion. All sessions give attendees a hands-on experience.

The sessions are fast-paced and interactive. Each workshop is architected to help attendees add new presentation skills to be successful both professionally and personally.

Geetesh: You were recently awarded as an MVP (Most Valuable Professional) by Microsoft for PowerPoint. Can you tell us more about your MVP Award?

Mike: It is such an honor. I’m so excited that I can share my experiences and influence future versions of the software. I use PowerPoint as both a presentation tool (for educations and sales) as well as a design tool (for infographics and marketing). My clients see PowerPoint as a graphics tool too. My hope is that I can help Microsoft, in some small way, improve the “PowerPoint as a design tool” experience without sacrificing what the software was made to do—presentations.

MVP Award

The company’s latest version of the tool is an evolutionary leap forward and I credit Microsoft PowerPoint’s amazing development team and the input they are receiving from users and MVPs around the world.

I will continue to be a champion for software best practices and defer to Microsoft for answers to my client’s toughest questions. (I apologize in advance to Microsoft’s PowerPoint developers. I get some tough questions.)

Used with permission from Sharyn Fitzpatrick/PresentationXpert

See Also: Mike Parkinson on Indezine

Presentation Summit 2016

What is the Presentation Summit?

For many years now, Rick Altman has been hosting the Presentation Summit, a highly popular event that is geared towards users of PowerPoint and other presentation platforms.

Date: October 23 to 26, 2016

Location: Green Valley Ranch, Las Vegas, United States

Register now!

Twitter Hashtag: Presum16

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Theme Fonts are font choices that are part of a Theme in PowerPoint or other Microsoft Office programs. Each Theme Font set has two font choices, one for the Heading fonts and another for the Body fonts. We already explored Theme Fonts in our Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows tutorial. Now let us learn how to create a new custom Theme Fonts set.



Learn how to create your own Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2013.

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Thursday, August 25, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST

Jon SchwabishJon Schwabish is an economist, writer, teacher, and creator of policy-relevant data visualizations. He is considered a leading voice for clarity and accessibility in how researchers communicate their findings. His new book about presentation design and techniques, Better Presentations: A Guide for Scholars, Researchers, and Wonks, is now available for preorder. You can find out more about Jon and his work on his site, PolicyViz.

In this conversation, Jon discusses his session at the upcoming Presentation Summit 2016 series.

Geetesh: You are doing the Unlocking the Value of Data session – can you tell us more about your session, and also what you believe the attendee will take away from this session?

Jon: It’s no secret that the value and availability of data has grown swiftly over the past few years. People who work with data and conduct analysis often seem to use a presentation as an excuse to simply move a written report into slides. But that approach typically results in text-, data-, and bullet-point laden slides that don’t deliver real value to the audience.

In this session, I’ll talk about strategies presenters can use to more effectively present their data to their audience. I’ll talk about good and bad data visualization practices and how to effectively present data to an audience, and how to strategically use data in a presentation. I’ll also do some hands-on data visualization work in Microsoft Excel to teach attendees a few ways to extend the capabilities of that software to make better, more effective visualizations.

Geetesh: Can you tell us more about your work with data, how that translates to presentations—and also about your upcoming book?

Jon: My background is in economics and I spent the first 9 years of my professional career working at the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), providing support and analysis to Members of Congress and their staffs. My research at CBO covered Social Security, income inequality, immigration, food stamps, and disability issues. But at some point, it became clear to me that our work wasn’t getting the attention I thought it deserved and I realized that we were probably thinking too hard about publishing the work instead of communicating the work. I started reworking graphic types in traditional reports, help design new report types, and started creating new graphic types.

So it felt like a natural pivot to not only think about better communication in written form, but also in verbal form, in front of an audience. Over the past few years, then, I’ve helped researchers and scholars and analysts improve the way they present to an audience. My new book, Better Presentations: A Guide for Scholars, Researchers, and Wonks—will be published in the fall by Columbia University Press—is geared for people who work with data and present their analysis to an audience, be it in around the office, in a seminar room, or to a large audience. The book will help researchers and analysts—who too often pack their slides full of tables and numbers and bullet points—improve the way they think about a presentation and how to deliver their content so that it will be remembered and acted upon. I tried to make my approach very practical and easy to implement. Deep down, I’m still a researcher, so my goal was to write a practical book that others could use to design, create, and deliver great presentations.

Overall, improving the way people communicate their data and their analysis has become my mission, because if you can’t communicate your research, then it helps no one.

Used with permission from Amy Winner/Socrata

See Also: Jon Schwabish on Indezine

Presentation Summit 2016

What is the Presentation Summit?

For many years now, Rick Altman has been hosting the Presentation Summit, a highly popular event that is geared towards users of PowerPoint and other presentation platforms.

Date: October 23 to 26, 2016

Location: Green Valley Ranch, Las Vegas, United States

Register now!

Twitter Hashtag: Presum16

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0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Creating outlines for PowerPoint in various external applications lets you stay away from distractions in PowerPoint-land and concentrate on the structure of your slides rather than their appearance. Once you have the outline created, it's very easy to import it in the form of slides into PowerPoint. While this import process works the same way in all versions of PowerPoint, there are small interface changes -- in this tutorial, we'll show you how to import outlines in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows.



Learn how to import outlines in PowerPoint 2016.

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