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Tuesday, July 22, 2014
posted by Geetesh at 10:30 AM IST



In this issue, we first look at how you can set a default recording device in Windows. We also have a conversation with James Ontra about Shufflrr, a document management system for presentations. We also explore how you can format content in Excel cells as text, important if your header rows are being formatted as data in your PowerPoint charts!

PowerPoint 2013 users can learn about Motion Path animations: adding them, drawing custom paths, reversing paths, and exploring opened/closed motion paths. We also look at animating ungrouped tables and adjusting the chart series overlaps.

And finally, do not miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh at 9:45 AM IST



Any typical Column chart contains two sets of data -- one set shows as the Series within your charts, and the other set ends up representing the Categories. By default, the Series show up as the Legend (and columns) within the chart. Categories on the other hand constitute the groups of these individual columns. You can quickly swap the visual representation of Series and Categories in the chart.



Learn how to switch data for your Series and Categories in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: charting, powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh at 9:15 AM IST



While working with Motion Paths, especially after drawing a Custom Motion Path to animate your slide object, you may feel that the path drawn is not very smooth. Or you may have used one of the preset Motion Paths to animate your slide object, and now you want to make some changes. Maybe you want to extend the path, or use smoother corners rather than the default pointed ones. Since Motion Paths are essentially lines drawn in PowerPoint, you can always edit them using the Edit Points option, and reorient them as required.



Learn how to edit Motion Paths with the help of the Edit Points option.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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Monday, July 21, 2014
posted by Geetesh at 9:45 AM IST



In PowerPoint, animating table components is not possible unless you ungroup the table. Once your table is ungrouped, you can animate the ungrouped table components as you wish. However, for those of you who don't want to ungroup your table, there is another workaround where you don't actually apply any animation to the table components, but when you play the slide containing the table, it looks like your table components are animating!



Learn how to fake animate a table in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2013, tables, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh at 9:15 AM IST



When most people use Motion Path animations, the feature they probably use the least is locking and unlocking the Motion Paths. Why is that so? Probably because these options are not too well documented or even intuitive. However, it's good to know more about these options since locking and unlocking Motion Paths can help you create better animations.



Learn how to lock and unlock motion paths in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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Friday, July 18, 2014
posted by Geetesh at 9:30 AM IST



Michelle SchoenAfter receiving graduate degrees in both Instructional Design and Project Management, Michelle Schoen has developed E-learning and software demos for Fortune 500 companies such as Delta, IBM, AT&T and Kimberly Clark. She is a frequent speaker at many live and online Learning and Development events and is currently serving on Chief Learning Officer magazine’s prestigious 2013 Business Intelligence Board. Michelle specializes in Camtasia Studio and PowerPoint training and consulting as well as in coaching her clients to create compelling online videos and demos.

In this conversation, Michelle discusses using PowerPoint to create video demos.

Geetesh: Can you tell us why you choose PowerPoint as a video creation tool over dedicated video programs?

Michelle:The idea of creating video at all is very intimidating to a lot of people. I believe that it is important to ease people into video by starting with tools they probably already own and with which they are familiar. Because Microsoft products are so popular and most corporations own them it just seemed natural to start with PowerPoint. In addition, each new version of PowerPoint, since 2007, has made it easier and easier to export in a video format that can be either imported into video editing programs or be uploaded directly to a website.

I have also been training audiences for years on a tool called Camtasia Studio and they have a plugin, that works from within PowerPoint. It allows anyone to record PowerPoint Presentations as MP4 videos while including web camera video and professional quality audio. The two tools work fabulously together for both marketing videos, software demos and elearning.

Geetesh: You do use plenty of animation in your PowerPoint videos -- can you share a few thoughts? Michelle: Sure. About a decade ago, when I was in Instructional Design at IBM we used to have to hire animators, graphic artists and programmers to put together any type of animation in our videos. These days I'm a one personal factory cranking out highly animated videos that look like they were done in something like Adobe After Effects and it amazes me what I can create.

Lately, I have been cutting some corners and purchasing low cost pre-animated templates from a variety of sources around the Internet and using them to create my videos for clients. I also customize pieces of these templates and put them into Camtasia for many of my training courses. These templates are filled with complex animations that I wouldn't have the time or initiative to make on my own and my clients love them. In fact, I have recently delivered a webinar on how to do these, what I call, PowerPoint Hacks and you are welcome to watch it on YouTube to learn some of my tricks and where I get the templates I use.


Michelle owns ScreencastVideoServices.com, CamtasiaTrainingAtlanta.com and co-owns the LearnCamtasia.com company with Lon Naylor.

Categories: interviews, powerpoint, video

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posted by Geetesh at 9:15 AM IST



Motion paths are essentially the paths (or lines) through which slide objects animate. These motion paths are just like any other line with curves, points, etc. If you are familiar with the drawing tools in PowerPoint (Line, Curve, Scribble, and Freeform), you know that paths can be either open or closed. A circle is a good example of a closed path, whereas an arc is an open path. So, how is the concept of open and closed paths relevant to Motion Path animations in PowerPoint?



Learn about the open and closed Motion Paths in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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