PowerPoint and Presenting Stuff

Thoughts and impressions of happenings in the world of PowerPoint and presentations. Explore, share and comment!

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Monday, May 29, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

Public speaking, presenting, whatever you want to call it can be terrifying but if you get your slides right not only will you feel way more confident delivering your presentation but your audience will be grateful too. Here’s our do’s and don’ts you should follow when creating your slides.

  1. Don’t use a stock template. Stock templates are generic, boring and overused. Invest some time into building your own PowerPoint template. It’ll give your presentations a bespoke feel that off-the-shelf templates can’t match.
  2. Turn up the contrast. If you’re placing text over an image or colored background, make sure it’s readable. If not, adjust the colors or contrast until it is.
  3. Choose complimenting colours. You’re not trying to complete the rainbow: three or four complementary colors should is plenty.
  4. Choose colors that stand out. There’s no need to deploy the neon pink, but make sure your colors stand out. Avoid using competing colors in bar charts and don’t place yellow or light blue against a white background.
  5. Slow down on the transitions. Transitions exist to help your presentation flow and enhance it, not overload it. Less is more.
  6. Go easy on the text. If your audience has to read and listen to you at the same time, one of the two is going to be ignored. Your slides should be used to convey key points only.
  7. Ditch the bullets. Ok maybe they’re ok for highlighting key points but if you’re going to deploy them for every line of text on every slide, what’s the point in having them at all?
  8. Left is best. Left alignment looks best in presentations; avoid centering body text.
  9. Use sans serif. For body text, sans serif fonts are more legible. Save the serifs for titles and headers if you must, but don’t go overboard – you won’t need more than two or three fonts throughout your presentation.
  10. Size fonts appropriately. The size of your font will naturally affect its legibility, but you also need to think about the ratio between your header and body text. Bear in mind the size of the room you’ll be presenting in. Will those at the back be able to read it?
  11. Don’t chop and change. Be consistent with your fonts. Whatever font you choose for your headers and body text should be the same throughout.
  12. Use bold and italics in moderation. You can highlight key words and phrases to draw your audience’s attention to key concepts but highlighting entire sentences just looks bad.
  13. Avoid cliched stock photos. Stock photos are great but cheesy, cliched ones are worse than PowerPoint clipart. Sites like Unsplash, Pexels and Death to the Stock Photo can provide a welcomed alternative to the traditional stock photo sites.
  14. One image per page. Remember it’s not a photo album it’s a presentation so stick to one image per page (that doesn’t mean one image on EVERY page)
  15. Images aren’t just photographs. Charts, arrows, completion bars and other graphics can all help to enhance your presentation when used effectively.
  16. We all love a filter. If you have the time you could apply the same filter to all of your images. This will give your presentation a harmonious and professional sheen. If you’re not a Photoshop user, you can use web-based software such as Canva to batch apply filters.

So there you have it. Follow these tips when creating your slides and your presentation will be so beautiful it’ll belong in a gallery (well maybe we’re exaggerating a touch). Now you’ve just got to deliver it. But that’s all on you.

Beautiful Presentations
Image: Pixabay


James Robinson (Buffalo 7)James Robinson is the Marketing Manager for Buffalo 7, the UK’s leading PowerPoint presentation design agency. Buffalo 7 works with names including UEFA Champions League, Dell, Red Bull, Facebook and the BBC.

See Also: SwiftPrez / PresentAssist: Conversation with Jamie Garroch

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Monday, May 29, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 AM IST

Are you unable to locate PowerPoint 2016 on your Mac computer? Sometimes, such a question can be embarrassing! Or are there other versions of PowerPoint on your computer—maybe older versions? Yes, we know that this can happen, although it does sound a little strange. However, there are perfectly valid excuses for you to be unable to locate PowerPoint.

Locate PowerPoint 2016 for Mac

Do you have PowerPoint 2016 installed on your Mac? Here’s how you can find out.

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Friday, May 26, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 AM IST

Do you quickly need to translate your slides from English to French or some words from English to Hindi? The best option available to you is to get a professional translator but did you know that PowerPoint includes rudimentary translation skills? This translation is not something that you could use without checking the results, but this is still a great start.

Translation in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows

Learn about translation from one language to another in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows.

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Thursday, May 25, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 AM IST

When you insert a new chart in PowerPoint, you might notice that an instance of the Excel sheet containing some dummy data for your chart pops up within PowerPoint. You then change the data within that instance of the Excel sheet to auto-update the chart on your slide. However, this Excel instance that stores your data has no separate existence. There’s no separate Excel sheet that contains your data. In fact, this Excel sheet is stored within your PowerPoint presentation itself.

Edit Chart Data in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows

Learn how to edit chart data in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

Jamie GarrochJamie Garroch, CEO of YOUpresent (formerly GMARK) founded the company to provide presentation professionals with presentation software, content and training. Jamie uses a range of presentation and e-learning tools on PC and Mac from PowerPoint to Keynote, Adobe CS and iSpring for presentations and Articulate Storyline for e-learning. He also uses PowerPoint as a programming environment to create authoring automation for his company’s productivity needs, custom add-ins for clients and off-the-shelf products for presentation designers.

In this conversation, Jamie discusses the new Guides Manager option within his G-Tools add-in for PowerPoint.

Geetesh: What problems do you see working with PowerPoint guides in presentations and templates?

Jamie: Guides are a really useful addition to PowerPoint that help presentation authors align their content perfectly, an attribute of slide design that sets great presentations apart from the rest. Quite often, guides are part of the setup of an organization’s template but all too often we see guides in templates placed on slides. This is not the best place for them because it’s easy for users to accidentally move them, rendering them useless. And what’s more, Ctrl+Z/Undo doesn’t revert these accidental movements. So guides on slides should only really be used by users who place them there temporarily when building their slide content. Guides for templates should reside on the Slide Master (applied to all layouts) or to specific layouts, depending on their intended use.

The second challenge is that it’s often difficult, and in some cases, impossible to manually place a guide exactly where you want it. Even when you use the Alt key for precise control. That can lead to tiny white gaps between shapes that you are trying to align because the guide isn’t quite where you thought you’d placed it.

Geetesh: How does the new Guides Manager in G-Tools help overcome these problems?

Jamie: This new feature in G-Tools is a productivity solution to help template designers and users alike manage the addition, deletion and copying/moving of guides more effectively. It provides an easy way to add guides to all slides in a deck (applied across multiple masters) where users can move them in the normal view, or to a single master which protects them from accidental movement, or to individual layouts – without changing from the normal view.

G-Tools - Guides Manager - Shape on Slide and Page

Each of these three placement locations uses a different default color with grey used for slides, red for masters and orange for layouts. G-Tools allows you to add guides using the default colors or any you choose. With a shape selected on a slide (or master or layout), you can use the Guides Manager to precisely add new guides to the top, right, bottom or left edge of any shape. The Guides Manager also includes tools to easily create a series of any number of equally spaced guides, either horizontally or vertically, at a specific position defined in inches/cm/points, precise control of the deletion of guides from their various placement locations and to even copy them from one location to another e.g. from slide to master.

The Guides Manager is available as a free upgraded for all existing G-Tools customers. Others can download a free trial of G-Tools, which has over 50 useful tools.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 AM IST

When you need to describe the relation between two or more sets of values in your presentation, charts are probably your best option. First of all, you should decide upon the chart type you require based the data you are going to present. Then, follow these steps to insert a chart on your slide in PowerPoint 2016.

Inserting Charts in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows

Learn how to insert charts in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows.

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 10:00 AM IST

We begin by exploring Research Tools in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows. We then also look at using the Thesaurus so that you can get access to better and different words. PowerPoint 2013 users can peep deep within PowerPoint’s options to look at the Trust Center. And for PowerPoint 2011 for Mac users, we teach you how you can locate the program! This is immensely useful if you do not know if PowerPoint is indeed installed or if you have multiple versions available. Finally, do not miss the press releases and templates of this week.

PowerPoint and Presenting News: May 9, 2017

Stay informed about updated tutorials and happenings on Indezine.

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:15 AM IST

We already looked at the Trust Center in a previous tutorial. But who knew that there so many settings available within the Trust Center? In this tutorial, we will explore these settings within PowerPoint 2013.

Trust Center Settings in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows

Learn about Trust Center Settings in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows.

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Monday, May 22, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

I’ve known Miguel for several years now and remember when I met him for the first time. It was at one of the Presentation Summit conferences, and Miguel walked into the Help Center with a USB drive and insisted that we look at his slides!

Several years later, Miguel wants me to see another visual art exercise that he calls Silhuetas, and I think it’s a good idea to share it with all Indezine readers.

I asked Miguel to share the PowerPoint techniques used to create this amazing effect, and here is his response: “Silhuetas” is a visual/video-art exercise developed with PowerPoint v2010 nearly 4 years ago. It contains just 3 inserted images: a silhouette and 2 backgrounds. The backgrounds are PowerPoint shapes filled with textures, and formatted with PowerPoint native tools including gradient fills (lights), a large amount of mixed/multiple effects. All these were leveraged by a few years of acquired PowerPoint experience & skills and…a truckload of “Chinese” patience…

Silhuetas: PowerPoint Slides from Miguel Monteiro


Miguel MonteiroMiguel Monteiro is General Manager & Creative Director at TRIBE Presentations (Portugal). Miguel has been a graphic designer/illustrator, working in Advertising and Communication Design since 1978 and developing computer based multimedia presentations since 1988, for many high end clients. Currently, Miguel focusses on creative consultancy and project development in business multimedia presentations design, video & audio production, event and scene design, exhibitions, etc.

See Also: TRIBE Presentations: Conversation with Miguel Monteiro

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Monday, May 22, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:00 AM IST

Before we begin, let us make it clear that this tutorial is primarily for those people who have more than one version of PowerPoint installed on their Mac. Additionally, they are not happy about the version that launches when they open a PowerPoint file. Or they may find that PowerPoint files open in another program even if they have PowerPoint installed. If any of these situations sound familiar to you, then this tutorial is for you.

Set PowerPoint 2011 for Mac as the Default Version

Learn how you can set PowerPoint 2011 for Mac as the default version.

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