This is the print version of this page. All content is copyright Indezine.com 2000- .



PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: December 2011

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes
PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary
PowerPoint Programming

Subscribe to this blog



PowerPoint Chart Types

Friday, December 30, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 1:09 PM IST



PowerPoint provides ample choices in chart types for almost every kind of graphical data representation. However, as you probably know all charts are not equal. Charts should be chosen depending upon the topic of your presentation, your audience, and the disposition of the presenter. The fact that you can change from one type of chart to another is a great way to experiment and play. Deciding upon the chart type though is just one of the decisions you need to take – you can then explore the different variants within each chart type. And if that was not enough, you can reposition, remove, or add chart elements such as data labels, legends, titles, etc. in differing layouts. Then color your charts as required – and ascertain whether you must animate them, or let them be static.



Explore various chart types that can be created within PowerPoint, and scenarios in which they are best used.

Categories: charting, powerpoint, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



This is the second of the four Combine Shape commands in PowerPoint 2011. You have already learned how Combine, the first of these commands works on selected shapes. Now, in this tutorial you will learn how to use Union, the second command of this quartet -- you will take two or more shapes and unite them. For example, we surrounded a circle with several stars over a donut shape as shown towards the left of the figure you see here. With these shapes selected, we could use the Union command to create a single united shape as shown towards the right in the same figure.



Learn how you can unite shapes in PowerPoint 2011 using the Union command.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, December 29, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You may wonder what happens behind the scenes whenever you do a spell check in PowerPoint or any other Microsoft Office program. This is what happens: PowerPoint looks at each word you have typed and matches those words with the entries listed within its dictionary. If the dictionary does not contain some of the words in your slides, it goes ahead and marks those words as misspelled. Then it offers you suggestions for changing those supposedly misspelled words to other similar words that can be found within its dictionary.

So why did we use the term "supposedly" in the last paragraph? That's because PowerPoint's dictionary is quite basic, and includes mainly words used in common, everyday language -- if a word does not exist within that dictionary, it is not necessarily misspelled! There are so many specialized words in different knowledge branches like medicine, research, law, computing, etc. that are not common words -- yet they are perfectly valid as far as spellings are concerned.

Learn how to load and use custom dictionaries in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, December 28, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



iPad presenting is a phenomenon that's waiting to take off. We have already explored how the iPad 2 and Apple TV 2 combination can make this concept work using AirPlay. Now we come to the last part of the hardware requirements in this post -- the part where you connect your Apple TV 2 to a TV or projector.

The Basics

Connecting to a TV or projector that has an HDMI input is a piece of cake -- just use a good quality HDMI cable to connect an Apple TV 2 to the TV or projector. Apple's HDMI cable is very portable and thin, though not too long -- if that works for you, then that's certainly the way to go. My experience turned out to be a little different since my Apple HDMI cable would not work with an Apple TV, a Mac Mini, and also a regular DVD player! I returned the cable -- once I receive the replacement, I will add a footnote or comment to this post to let you know how that fares. Right now, I am successfully using a Belkin PureAV HDMI cable to connect my Apple TV 2 to a Sony LED TV.

HDMI and Surround Sound

Many new projectors support HDMI input, and some of these also support audio using HDMI rather than just video. I could not find much info on which projectors are compatible with Apple TV's HDMI output to get both video and audio -- projector manufacturers still don't mention if their products are Apple TV 2 ready. However, there is so much content online on connecting Microsoft's XBox game console to HDMI capable projectors, and many projector vendors seem to mention XBox compatibility. Fortunately, as a rule of the thumb, XBox compatibility as far as HDMI is concerned does translate to relevance for Apple TV 2's HDMI output as well.

In addition, if you need surround sound, then the projector's (or the TV's) sound output will probably not give you the quality you want -- you can connect the optical audio port on the Apple TV 2 to an amp or any other surround-capable output. The figure below shows you the ports you can expect to see on an Apple TV 2.



There are plenty of threads on Apple's forums that discuss surround sound output from an Apple TV 2 -- here is one of them.

Older TVs and Projectors without HDMI Inputs

Now we come to the part where you want to know how you can connect your Apple TV 2 to a DVI, VGA, or some other input.

First of all, I do believe that DVI is the only other option worth considering -- and that too because adding a adapter from HDMI to DVI still retains a digital signal, and does not change it to analog. If you must connect to an analog input source such as VGA, then you must not consider wireless presenting from the iPad. The ideal solution in that case would be to forego an Apple TV 2 and connect the iPad straight to a VGA input using Apple's iPad Dock Connector to VGA Adapter.

However, you may have a perfectly capable projector that you do not want to replace -- and even then, you should consider those older projectors only if they support DVI input. Also remember that DVI by itself will only be capable of video and will forego any sound altogether. You can still use the optical audio port on your Apple TV 2 to access sound, but many presenters are quite happy to deliver an iPad presentation without audio.

Before you rush to buy an HDMI to DVI adapter, you must make sure that the HDMI end of the adapter is no wider than the HDMI port of your Apple TV 2 -- anything thicker will not fit into Apple TV 2's HDMI port since the power input is located right next to the HDMI input (see figure earlier in this post). The best HDMI to DVI adapter that I found is actually Apple's own HDMI to DVI cable that they provided as part of Mac Minis that shipped in 2010 -- but they don't sell it in the retail chain! The figure below shows how the Apple's HDMI to DVI adapter looks like.



So which HDMI to DVI adapter should you get? Make sure you get one that has a cable in between the HDMI and DVI ends!

See Also:
iPad Presenting 01 - First Questions First
iPad Presenting 02 - Presenter’s View in PowerPoint: Conversation with Rikk Flohr
iPad Presenting 03 - Air Display: Conversation with Dave Howell
iPad Presenting 04 - Add an Apple TV
iPad Presenting 05 - What is AirPlay?

Categories: ipad, keynote, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



PowerPoint has more than a hundred shapes but there are times when you want to combine two or more shapes to create your own shape. For example, we placed several basic shapes over a circle to create a smiling caricature as shown towards the left of the figure, below. With these shapes selected, we then used the Combine command that is explained later in this tutorial to create a unified, combined shape as shown towards the right in the figure below.



Learn how you can combine shapes in PowerPoint 2011 using the Combine command.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, December 27, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Imagine this scenario -- you have created a specialized, medical presentation that's full of squiggly, red, underlined words! These squiggly underlines indicate what PowerPoint considers to be as a misspelled word! Don't blame PowerPoint, because its medical skills are somewhat limited -- we do know that almost all the words in your medical presentation are perfectly valid as far as spelling is concerned. The silver lining here though is that you can teach PowerPoint to spell those words -- and enhance PowerPoint's custom dictionary. Of course, not only can you teach PowerPoint how to spell medical words, but you can also teach the program how to spell words that enhance lexicons in various other subjects such as research, law, computing, etc. Any changes you make by adding new spellings of words in PowerPoint will also influence spell checking in other Microsoft Office programs such as Word, Excel, Outlook, etc.

Learn how to edit custom dictionaries in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, proofing, text, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Monday, December 26, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



In 2004, Apple introduced what was then a revolutionary technology that let you play music from iTunes on your Mac or Windows PC on speakers that could have been in the next room or anywhere else within your network. This technology was called AirTunes, and the speakers you wanted to play the music over had to be connected to an AirPort Express or Apple TV device. Yes, we are talking about the first generation Apple TVs here.

AirPlay is a natural evolution of AirTunes as it moves beyond sound to encompass video as well. It is only now with the launch of newer iPads and iPhones -- and also with the new features in iOS 5 that AirPlay provides ample solutions for you to present your entire presentation. Essentially, if you want to present from your iPad 2 (or even an iPad 1), this is what you need:

  1. An iOS device such as the iPad 2 or iPhone 4S -- older iPad 1 and iPhone 4 devices have partial support for all features you need to present well, and we shall explore these shortcomings in a future post.

  2. An Apple TV 2 device, updated to the latest firmware. The current firmware is 4.4.4.

  3. A TV or projector connected to your Apple TV 2. It is easy to connect to most TVs these days with an HDMI cable. Many new projectors have HDMI input options. Alternatively, you can use an HDMI to DVI converter if you have a projector with DVI input -- but that will lose sound. Again sound may not be a huge priority if you are showing slides without multimedia.

That's all you need to have in place -- and frankly Apple TV 2 is even smaller than an iPad -- so, that does not hamper your portability. It is a good idea to ensure though that the venue where you will present has projectors equipped with HDMI inputs. If the projector at the venue you will present has been suspended from the ceiling or has been fitted somewhere else, then you may only get a VGA cable to attach your Apple TV 2 to -- and that will not work well for you to provide a professional and predictable presentation.



Everything we discussed so far in this post was relevant only to presenting with an iPad, and not necessarily for other AirPlay scenarios. The rest of this post will look at these other scenarios -- feel free to ignore this section if this is not something you want to explore.

AirPlay lets you transmit data such as audio and video content wirelessly from:

  • iTunes running on your Mac or Windows PC.

  • An iOS 5 device such as an iPad 1 or iPhone 4. Both these devices only work with the Music, Video, and Photos apps -- and sometimes you get only the visual content without audio -- AirPlay support for the iPad 1 or iPhone 4 is a little flaky.

  • An iOS5 device such as an iPad2 or iPhone 4S -- both allow full mirroring of what you see on your device.

Using AirPlay, you can send these audio and video signals to an AirPlay receiving device, such as:

  • A TV or projector connected to an Apple TV 2 device.

  • An AirPlay compatible receiver -- as of now, Apple has only licensed AirPlay receiving technology to audio devices such as speakers.

  • A Bluetooth capable audio receiver, even if it has no AirPlay support -- Apple seems to have combined the Bluetooth output support for its iOS devices (iPad, iPod Touch, and iPhone) under the AirPlay umbrella.

More info on AirPlay can be found on Apple's website -- look at these pages that discuss the iPad's Airplay features and how you can control AirPlay output from within iTunes.

In addition, Wikipedia's AirPlay page provides a historical look at this technology along with some discussions about AirPlay alternatives.

See Also:
iPad Presenting 01 - First Questions First
iPad Presenting 02 - Presenter’s View in PowerPoint: Conversation with Rikk Flohr
iPad Presenting 03 - Air Display: Conversation with Dave Howell
iPad Presenting 04 - Add an Apple TV

Categories: ipad, keynote, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

1 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Combine Shapes are new for PowerPoint 2011 and are a set of four tools that let you combine, unite, intersect, or subtract selected shapes in various ways, depending upon which shape overlaps the other. Unfortunately they are so well hidden that you may not even be aware that they exist! You won't find these commands in any of the Ribbon tabs -- nor will you be able to customize your toolbars to get these options. To view the Combine commands, you need to select two or more shapes. Then right-click (or Ctrl-click) the selection. In the resultant contextual menu, select the Grouping option to summon the sub-menu -- you will find the four Combine Shapes commands here!

Learn about the Combine Shapes commands in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Friday, December 23, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



These New Year themed clip arts for PowerPoint are all silhouettes that are ready to use within your PowerPoint presentation slides. These have been provided in both black and white colors -- both variations are contained within two separate sample presentations that you can download.

Copy the graphics of your choice from the downloaded presentations, and paste them into your PowerPoint presentation slides. You can also paste them into a Word document, an Excel worksheet, or any other program.

Within PowerPoint, all these silhouette graphics can be customized with Shape Styles.

 

Download these free New Year clip art graphics here.

Categories: clip_media, design, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The AutoCorrect feature is dependent on a small list of words and phrases -- this list contains two columns called Replace and With -- for example the Replace entry for teh will correspond to the With entry containing the word the. Although this list works for PowerPoint users, what you must know is that this AutoCorrect list is global across all Microsoft Office programs such as Word, Excel, Outlook, etc. If you add, edit, or delete entries within this AutoCorrect list, all changes will be reflected beyond PowerPoint.

Learn how to create and edit AutoCorrect entries in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Thursday, December 22, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



There is no dearth of sites providing royalty-free pictures that can be used in your PowerPoint presentations -- but, none of these provide the breadth of choices that you can find at the Microsoft Office site (Office.com). Even better, all these pictures are free to all licensed users of Microsoft Office programs such as PowerPoint. Office.com allows you to download various types of clip media, including pictures.

Learn how to download clip media from Microsoft's Office.com on a Mac.

Categories: clip_media, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, December 21, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Presentation Assistant Pro is the professional edition of Presentation Assistant -- both are on-screen presentation tools that work like an assistant when you are delivering a presentation, or doing a training session. In this review, we are looking at the Pro version of Presentation Assistant. Presentation Assistant Pro provides various tools that equip you to make your audience attentive -- some of these tools such as zoom can enlarge portions of the screen. Other tools such as spotlight, curtain, screen digital clock, arrow point, magnification, screen capture etc. offer significant assistance in explaining processes or steps to an audience.

Read the Indezine review of Presentation Assistant Pro.

Categories: add-in, delivery, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The AutoCorrect feature in PowerPoint corrects common typos and spelling errors of text within your PowerPoint slides -- automatically as you type. Have you ever wondered how PowerPoint knows that a particular word is spelled wrong? Does it refer to some resource as a reference? Also do you find some AutoCorrect options such as the capitalization of some words unnecessary? Several researchers working in different scientific fields actually have to use some words that cannot start with a capital letter, and the first thing they want to do is turn off the automatic capitalization. Yes, it's possible to make AutoCorrect work just the way you want it to -- as long as you know where to change these options.

Explore AutoCorrect options in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, December 20, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



After you add text within a shape in PowerPoint 2011, you can do basic edits like adding, deleting, or replacing existing text but if you want more control over how your text has been placed within the shape or a text box, you'll need to access text editing options within the Format Text dialog box.



Learn how to align text within a shape or text box in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, text, tutorials

Labels: , , , ,

0 comments




Monday, December 19, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Soon after we did the Halloween Pumpkin Contest conversation with Nancy Duarte, we planned another one with her about Duarte.com/edy -- but she graciously mailed back saying "Duarte.com/edy is the creation of Eric Albertson, Doug Neff, and Corey Rothermel. I'll let them answer your questions directly." Thank you, Nancy!

Geetesh: Duarte.com/edy's teaser trailer describes itself as a series of videos that teaches the ABCs of great presentations. What motivated this series, and is there a "comedy" factor somewhere?

Eric, Doug, and Corey: It all started about two years ago when the two of us who work at Duarte (Doug and Eric) discovered we shared a passion for all things 'puppet'. We started meeting in the mornings before work to practice together and teach each other what we knew. That sounds a lot more focused and productive than it actually was in the beginning. Each rehearsal pretty much boiled down to which of us could make the other one laugh the hardest by the end. So, comedy has always been at the core of what we're doing. I think we’d find it hard, in fact, to have puppets without trying to make it funny.

The project itself stemmed out of the question, "So how do we take this thing we love to do and make it into something we can share with others?" We really wanted to share what we love about puppetry. I'm not sure which one of us suggested it first, but at some point the idea of blending what we do before work with what we do at work became obvious.



At Duarte, Inc., we live on the cutting edge of the presentation world. Puppetry gave us a new (softer and fuzzier) cutting edge to play with, and Duarte.com/edy was born. We pitched Nancy on a series of short, Sesame Street style episodes that would teach the ABCs of good presentations to a variety of audiences Duarte, Inc. might not normally reach, from schoolchildren all the way up to executives.

Once we got the go from Nancy, we pulled in Doug's partner Corey to be our director and help us bring this craziness to life. And here we are now, two years later.


Make Your Slides Count from Duarte Design on Vimeo.

Geetesh: Can you share some insight into what topics we can expect to be featured on Duarte.com/edy?

Eric, Doug, and Corey: Since Nancy literally wrote the book on presentations, our topic list was easy. We plan to draw heavily from the lessons in both of her books, Slide:ology and Resonate, for our skits. So expect to see episodes about avoiding clichés, moving your audience, and using S.T.A.R. moments in the coming months.

See Also:

Slide:ology - The Nancy Duarte Interview

Resonate: The Nancy Duarte Interview

Categories: interviews, powerpoint, presentation_skills, training

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The AutoCorrect feature in PowerPoint fixes hundreds of common typos and spelling errors within your PowerPoint slides -- automatically as you type any text. AutoCorrect also lets you map specific keys to a symbol, such as replacing two en dashes with an em dash the moment you hit the Enter key. The best feature within AutoCorrect is that it works so seamlessly that you may even take it for granted -- conversely, AutoCorrect can also be a pain sometimes! You may for example not want the two en dashes to automatically change to an en dash -- in this tutorial you will learn how you can take advantage of AutoCorrect, and also how you can override its options as required.

Explore AutoCorrect options in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Saturday, December 17, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Jay WilderJay Wilder is director of product marketing at Brainshark, Inc. Brainshark’s cloud-based software lets users create online and mobile video presentations – using simple business tools like PowerPoint and the telephone – and then share and track their content. Thousands of companies use Brainshark to improve the reach and results of their business communications, while dramatically reducing costs.

In this conversation, Jay discusses new features in SlideShark – an app from Brainshark that solves the problem of PowerPoint’s incompatibility on the iPad.

Geetesh: SlideShark provides an amazing option to display PowerPoint presentations on the iPad -– what are the new features that you just announced?

Jay: Since SlideShark's launch in October, we've added exciting, new features to provide an even richer user experience. They’re geared toward helping our users better conduct business on-the-go – allowing for more interactive, live presentation capabilities and additional storage options, among other valuable features. These include:

  • Greater storage capacity – To help users who want to view and present large files, all accounts now start at 100MB of free storage. If you’d like to add more storage, you can purchase a “SlideShark Plus” upgrade – 500MB of storage (on top of the free 100MB) is $49/year, and 1GB of additional storage is $98/year.

  • Refer a friend – You can also earn extra storage at no cost by referring friends to SlideShark via a personalized URL. Each time a friend signs up for a free account, you both get an extra 25MB of storage. Both free and Plus users can earn up to +500MB of extra storage.

  • Upload to SlideShark from the iPad – In addition to uploading PowerPoint files to your SlideShark account from your computer, you can now use the "Open in" functionality to do the uploads and conversions directly from the iPad as well. For instance, files received on the iPad via email or accessed via cloud storage services like iCloud, Box and Dropbox can be uploaded to SlideShark and automatically converted for iPad use.

  • Laser pointer – This feature lets you direct your audience's attention to key points in presentations. While presenting via a projector or TV, simply press and hold your finger anywhere on the iPad. A red laser pointer will appear and follow your finger as you move it across the screen.

    SlideShark Laser Pointer

  • "Hide Slides" functionality – With this feature, you can hide one or more slides prior to presenting. This is helpful when modifying presentations based on different audiences. Simply tap the "Edit" button in the top right of a presentation’s preview screen to access the "Hide Slides" functionality.

  • 16:9 widescreen support – In addition to supporting standard 4:3 sized PowerPoint slide decks, SlideShark now also supports the visually appealing 16:9 widescreen format. 16:9 slides are letter-boxed to fit the iPad’s 4:3 screen size correctly.

Geetesh: Can you tell us more about the direction you are looking at for SlideShark in the near future?

Jay:We've been thrilled with user adoption since launching SlideShark –- averaging two downloads/minute, 24x7. We're currently the #5 Productivity App in the App Store, which is a great honor. I think our greatest pleasure comes from user feedback, ratings and reviews. A 4.5 star rating across hundreds of reviews from around the world gives you a great feeling of accomplishment and a drive to keep making the experience better. Users have been great about providing feedback as well, and we're continuing to add new functionality based on the features they request. We're very busy and not planning on slowing down –- so we encourage our users to keep letting us know what they think and what would be most helpful to them.

While we've introduced the paid storage upgrades, we'll still be maintaining a full-featured free version too –- enabling any business or education user to benefit from the app. As we head into 2012, we'll also be looking to address the needs of large, multi-user organizations through user management enhancements to SlideShark. We look forward to continuing to meet our users' needs by helping them view and show PowerPoints –- reliably and professionally -– on their iPads.

See Also: SlideShark: Conversation with Jay Wilder

Categories: brainshark, interviews, ipad, powerpoint

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Friday, December 16, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Steve RindsbergSteve Rindsberg has been associated with PowerPoint since the product originated more than two decades ago -- his PowerPoint FAQ site is a treasure trove of PowerPoint information. When he's not updating his site, he's creating new PowerPoint add-ins that expand possibilities within PowerPoint. Steve's also into a lot of print technology related stuff.

In this conversation, Steve discusses PPTools Resize, his new PowerPoint add-in that resizes slide dimensions.

Geetesh: What is PPTools Resize, and how did this new PowerPoint add-in evolve?

Steve: PPTools Resize is a PowerPoint add-in that allows PowerPoint users to change the size of their slides without distorting anything on the slides.

Oddly, it solves a problem I used to struggle with daily when I was in the 35mm slide service bureau business, years and years ago. The default PowerPoint slide size, then as now, was On-screen Show (4:3) 10x7.5 inches or the equivalent in metric. But 35mm slides are differently proportioned, 11.25x7.5 inches. Early on, when customers would send in default-sized presentations (which most of them did), we'd have to make manual adjustments.

And then, as now, you can't just change the page size. When you do that, everything on the slide gets stretched or squished. Your pie charts all become egg-charts! So we'd create a new copy of the presentation, change the size, delete anything that got distorted and finally, copy and the paste deleted shapes back into the presentation from the unchanged original. This. Took. Time. Lots. Of. Time.

At the time, there was no way of writing add-ins for PowerPoint, and by the time there was, slide-making software and hardware had evolved to the point where there were relatively simple ways of dealing with incorrectly sized presentations.

So while I began writing add-ins to solve other problems, I forgot all about this one.

Then came wide-screen laptops, monitors and projectors. PowerPoint got new wide-screen slide sizes in Office 2007 and immediately, users began to have the same problem as we'd had back in the days when dinosaurs roamed the earth and presenters used 35mm slides: the default presentation size didn't fill their laptop screens and if they changed the page size so it did .... egg-charts again!

I assumed that Microsoft would include a fix for this problem in the next version of PowerPoint, but Office 2010 came out and left users with egg(-chart) on their faces again. If Microsoft wasn't going to fix the problem, I decided that I would.

Perhaps this feature will appear in PowerPoint 20-whatever's-next. Perhaps it won't. But we know that it'll never appear in PowerPoint 2010, 2007, 2003, 2002 or 2000. Resize is here now, and works with all of them.



Geetesh: What does PPTools Resize do differently than the Page Setup options within PowerPoint?

Steve: When you change the Page Setup in PowerPoint and select a new size that's not proportional to the current size, PowerPoint stretches your slides to fit. And in the process, it stretches everything ON your slides ... remember our egg-charts? To most PowerPoint users, that's simply not acceptable.

But with Resize, you choose a new size for your presentation from among PowerPoint's standard sizes or several additional special-purpose pre-defined sizes or any custom size you care to define. Instead of squeezing your original presentation out of shape, Resize creates a copy of it, changes its page size, then copy/pastes all the content from the original presentation, undistorted, into the new slides, masters and layouts.

By default, Resize pops this content into the center of the newly resized pesentation, making it as large as it can without distortion, but it also lets you adjust the left/right and top/bottom position of content on the new presentation or even add a margin all around the content. It's all a bit difficult to visualize, but your Resize review on Indezine has some great visual examples. So does the PDF Help / Manual included with Resize (which you can also download independently -- links to a PDF).

Could you do all of this manually in PowerPoint, no add-in needed? You could, but remember, you have to change the size of everything on every slide. And every Master and Slide Layout. If there's text, you need to change the font size of every bit of text. And change the line spacing. And paragraph spacing. And line widths of each shape. And ... and ... and ...

Resize will finish your entire presentation in less time than it takes to convert a single slide manually.

Categories: add-in, interviews, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

1 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



You have already learned about Dynamic Reordering of shapes, where all slides objects are placed in an individual layered view suitable for reordering. This may work well when you have a few objects on your slide but is entirely unpractical if your slide has anything over 10 objects. Fortunately, there is a variation of this technique that lets you only work with the selected slide objects, and any other slide objects that overlap the selection. This option is called Reorder Overlapping Objects.

Learn about the Dynamic Reordering of the overlapping Shapes and other slide objects in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, December 15, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



We already showed you how to summon the Spelling dialog box and spell check your entire presentation for any misspelled words. While this is a great way of checking your slides once your presentation has been created, there are other ways to spell check, and also some tips to help you understand how you can do better proofing of your text content. This page contains a collection of these tips.

Explore more spelling options in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, December 14, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Jamie GarrochJamie Garroch, CEO of GMARK Ltd., founded the company in 2009 to provide presentation professionals with PowerPoint software, content and training. Jamie conceived the idea for the company’s first product, ActivePrez from a non-linear presenting need and has since added several other add-in products. His newest add-in is Slide Linker -- a product born out of the need to link slides together so that all linked slides are glued to each other when copied to other presentations.

In this conversation, Jamie talks about the free Slide Linker add-in for PowerPoint, and his business of creating custom PowerPoint add-ins.

Geetesh: What exactly does Slide Linker do, and how did this free add-in evolve?

Jamie: Slide Linker is a small add-in that demonstrates the amazing extensibility of Microsoft Office applications that many readers may be unaware of. By installing an add-in, users can gain access to new functionality for PowerPoint (and other Office apps) just as they do when they download apps for their Windows Phone, Android Phone, or iPhone.

The Slide Linker add-in provides PowerPoint users with the ability to link slides in groups and keep them together when copied and pasted to another presentation. It makes a small yet significant change to the Home tab of the Ribbon by replacing the standard Copy button with a Copy+ button. This functions as expected with standard Copy operations but a new drop down menu provides the ability to link slides, view linked slides and delete links from slides. Once slides are linked, if any one of them is selected and the Copy+ button is clicked, all slides in that linked group will be copied to the Windows clipboard. The idea was born from a LinkedIn PowerPoint group where a user asked if this was possible within PowerPoint. The answer is yes!



Geetesh: You also develop custom add-ins for PowerPoint users -– tell us more about some work you have done in this area?

Jamie: GMARK specializes in add-in development both for our own products and custom development for small to large enterprise clients. We’ve worked for the likes of UPS to create an automatic presentation generation tool to assist field sales personnel in building audience targeted decks.

We're currently developing a new add-in for one of the top three Indian IT vendors to automate the process of keeping presentations on-brand and a European client to add galleries of commonly used on-brand content to the Ribbon. The exciting vision that add-ins bring is that publishers such as ourselves now have a way to extend the functionality of PowerPoint to do almost anything one can imagine. If you can't find a way to do something with an Office app, then add-ins are a great way to get exactly what you want and need while maintaining your investment in Microsoft Office.

Categories: add-in, interviews, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Although you can change the order of shapes or any other slide objects using the conventional Send to Back and Bring to Front options in the Arrange gallery, you can do reordering in a much intuitive way in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac. We call this new technique Dynamic Reordering, and this works by dragging shapes to the required positions in a special reorder view.

Learn about Dynamic Reordering of shapes and other slide objects in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, December 13, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



For presentations that contain slides with too much text, or even little text -- there are always chances of spelling mistakes showing up! However, you don't necessarily have to search for these mistakes by skimming all your slides one by one since PowerPoint lets you do a spell check of the entire presentation, and make corrections as well. However there are some caveats associated with spell checking, and this does not have anything to do with PowerPoint. The main caveat is while PowerPoint is good at finding spelling mistakes, it won't find any wrong words you have used as long as the spellings can be found in a dictionary. As far as PowerPoint is concerned, "dear" are "deer" both are valid spellings -- so "Deer Dairy" is acceptable when you may have meant "Dear Diary"! So always do skim your slides even after you do a spell check.

Learn how to run a spell check on your entire presentation in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Monday, December 12, 2011
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



If you are serious about iPad presenting, then you may have already realized that it makes no sense to attach your iPad to a TV or projector with a cable. For one this means that your iPad is physically tied to a location, and you cannot really move around and navigate your content at the same time. And also the fact that you miss out on portability, the iPad's biggest advantage.

The direction you need to explore is quite obvious as far as Apple is concerned -- they would like you to look at their Apple TV device. An Apple TV connects to TVs and projectors with the requisite cables. Thereafter it creates a wireless connection with your iPad using the built-in AirPlay technology -- the rest of this post will explore both Apple TV and AirPlay.

So what is an Apple TV? Actually there are two types of Apple TVs:

  1. 1st generation Apple TVs that included hard disk space, were larger in size, and cost 3 times as much as the new 2nd generation Apple TVs. These are useless for iPad users since they do not support AirPlay. Also they are too large to be carried around. These included a remote as shown in the picture below.



  2. 2nd generation Apple TVs that have no hard disk space (they actually have 8GB of flash disk space, but that is undocumented). These are much smaller than 1st generation Apple TVs, and are AirPlay capable making them great to use with iPads. Also they are small enough to fit within the palm of your hand and can be easily carried around along with your iPad. These also include a remote, although the remote is not shown in the picture below.

Once you connect your Apple TV to a TV or projector, you can then make the TV or projector display anything on your iPad (or an iPhone or an iPod Touch) as long as you have these prerequisites in place:

  1. iOS 5 installed on your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch -- this update adds improved AirPlay capabilities to your iOS devices.

  2. An iPad 2 or iPhone 4S will provide you with AirPlay mirroring -- thus anything that shows up on your iOS device screen will show up on the TV or projector output. If you have an iPad 1 or an iPhone 4, AirPlay will still work -- but just with the Photos app -- and not much else. That's not as limited as you may believe -- you can save most of your slides as successive pictures in an album -- you can then have a cool presentation showing off your iPad 1 or iPhone 4. You will lose out on animations and multimedia -- but many iPad and iPhone apps still do not support all PowerPoint bells and whistles -- so that's not such a bad solution! On the other hand, what irks me is that even Apple's own Keynote will not support AirPlay on iPad 1 and iPhone 4.

In the next post in this series, we will look more at AirPlay, and what more you can do using this technology. If you want to share some feedback about this new iPad Presenting series, feel free to leave a comment below or get in touch with us through our feedback page.

See Also:
iPad Presenting 01: First Questions First
iPad Presenting 02 - Presenter’s View in PowerPoint: Conversation with Rikk Flohr
Air Display: Conversation with Dave Howell

Categories: ipad, keynote, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

1 comments








Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Home | PowerPoint | Photoshop | PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Tutorials | Blog | Notes | Ezine | Advertise | Feedback | Site Map | About Us | Contact Us

Link to Us | Privacy | Testimonials

PowerPoint Backgrounds | Christian PowerPoint Backgrounds | Business PowerPoint Presentation Templates

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

©2000-2016, Geetesh Bajaj. All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000