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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: March 2012

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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PowerPoint and Presenting Notes
PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary
PowerPoint Programming

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Articulate, PowerPoint, and E-Learning: Conversation with Tom Kuhlmann

Friday, March 30, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Tom KuhlmannTom Kuhlmann is VP, Community for Articulate, where he manages the Articulate user community. He also writes the Rapid E-Learning Blog which is published weekly to over 80,000 readers. Tom has developed and managed e-learning courses for both large and small organizations. He’s passionate about learning technology and his core focus is on helping people succeed and grow. He is known throughout the industry for his practical, no-nonsense approaches to e-learning. He’s also a frequent speaker at ASTD and e-learning industry events. He has a Master’s in Education Technology from Pepperdine.

In this conversation, Tom discusses how PowerPoint users can start using Articulate tools to create e-learning content.

Geetesh: What exactly is e-learning, and how is the concept similar to the slide-based metaphor of programs such as PowerPoint?

Tom: E-learning can mean many things depending on the audience. For some, it's anything that's online and focused on learning. That's a pretty broad definition and can range from authoring applications like Articulate's Rapid Elearning Studio to collaborative social media applications like wikis and forums. In my part of the industry, it means more traditional type training courses that have transitioned from classroom content to online courses.

Years ago, authoring such a course required a host of people like instructional designers, graphic artists, and programmers. Then rapid elearning came to be. Now many of the tools use PowerPoint as the authoring platform. This allows non-programmers to fully leverage the fantastic authoring capabilities available in PowerPoint and then publish to Flash and create viable elearning courses usually much faster than in the past and at a better price.



Geetesh: How can PowerPoint users or those with a huge amount of PowerPoint content move up to e-learning using Articulate products?

Tom: Essentially tools like Articulate Presenter have put the power of course creation into the hands of those close to the expertise and knowledge. I like to think that we've democratized elearning. It creates opportunities for those who in the past didn't have access to build courses because of the cost associated with custom Flash development. If you can work in PowerPoint, then you can build and publish elearning courses. Which gets us to the heart of what probably interests your readers most.



Articulate Presenter is going to convert what you create in PowerPoint to an interactive elearning course. The more you know about PowerPoint, the more successful you can be. This is exciting on a few levels. Anyone now has access to take their classroom content and convert that to elearning. And for those who are PowerPoint superstars, there’s a new industry looking for your skills.

One challenge with this easy authoring is that publishing courses isn't the same as publishing good courses. Building a good course requires combining PowerPoint skills with sound instructional and visual design. Another challenge is that PowerPoint has a few constraints. The cool thing is that with the Articulate Rapid E-Learning Studio, we address them. We include additional applications to augment the development of interactive elearning. The studio includes Quizmaker for building quizzes and Engage to build learning interactions. They're both form-based tools so you just need to add the content and the tools will build it out on publish.

The combination of combining PowerPoint with these other tools lets you build some pretty dynamic e-learning courses. Here are some links that show examples of PowerPoint-based e-learning:

Rhinoplasty
Office Ergonomics
Using Communication Tools at Christian Aid
Frog Dissection
Evernote Tour

See Also: Articulate Presenter ’09: Conversation with Mark Schwartz

Categories: add-in, articulate, interviews, online_presentations, powerpoint

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Thursday, March 29, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



We have already explored both entrance and emphasis animation types. The third type of animation in PowerPoint is called Exit animation, and the various Exit animation effects determine how an animated slide object disappears from the slide. For example, the slide objects can fade out or fly off-screen. Of course, both Fade and Fly off are just two of the many Exit animation effects available.

Explore Exit animations in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Wednesday, March 28, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



In addition to being a ubiquitous presentation program, PowerPoint also works great as a simple drawing program as you have explored in our Drawing Trees in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac tutorial. We have already done an extensive series of tutorials on shapes, and in this tutorial, we will show you how to use simple techniques already explained in other tutorials to draw a shopping bag in PowerPoint 2011. You need not go back to those older tutorials since most concepts are drop-dead easy – yet if you want to know more, we have linked to all technique tutorials in the relevant parts of this page. So let’s start drawing our shopping bag!

Learn how to use default shapes in PowerPoint 2011 to draw a shopping bag.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

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1 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Phillip GibbsPhillip Gibbs has been involved in the audio-visual production business for 25 years and co-founded IMS Communications, an events production business, in 1991. Over time, clients’ expectations for their conferences have climbed higher and higher; they want them to be memorable and efficient in communicating their messages. They also want them to be eye-catching and to run as smoothly as a TV programme. As technology has changed, shows have become slicker requiring custom software to manipulate graphics, video and interactive devices. IMS designers have taken this development one step further – to help presenters keep to time.

In this conversation, Phillip discusses PresenterClock, a PowerPoint add-in that allows presenters to be on schedule.

Geetesh: Tell us about your PresenterClock add-in for PowerPoint, and what motivated you to create this product?

Phillip: The core part of our services involves producing large events, usually conferences. A problem we often encounter is getting presenters to stick to their allotted time. If one or more speakers over-run, it has an impact on everything else for that event such as timings of sessions, breaks, catering arrangements, and delegate travel plans. Even a well-rehearsed presentation can overrun!

We had investigated various systems to rectify the problem but all were expensive and cumbersome to operate. We initially developed the PresenterClock to show presenters exactly how much time they have left as part of our bespoke software we use to run the show. This was linked to each session allowing the allocated time for each presenter to be pre-programmed and automatically started when the session changed to the new presenter (overcoming one of downsides of standalone clocks).

We also wanted to be able to send messages to the presenters informing them of any changes that may have arisen; maybe the next presenter is held up in traffic, a quick on screen message is quicker and far neater than walking onstage with a piece of paper!



From experience we found that presenters often lost their flow because they couldn't remember what was coming up next so we thought having a large area showing the next slide was crucial. The presenter notes feature followed from a client request.

We then saw an opportunity to turn this into a commercial product, and the integration into PowerPoint made perfect sense. A problem we had to overcome was of the third video output as PresenterClock requires 3 screens; this is where the USB to VGA adapter comes in. Once we had this final piece of the puzzle we went on to develop the PowerPoint add-in.

Geetesh: Although PresenterClock works on a third display, how different is it from PowerPoint’s own Presenter View – does it add any extra features not found in Presenter View?

Phillip: PresenterClock isn't designed to be a replacement for the Presenter View. As mentioned earlier, its original main purpose is to replace a traffic light system and show how much time the presenter has left. It shows the next slide and presenter notes which is an obvious added bonus over these systems. Presenter View is more of an operator view, and as such is designed to be used at smaller, more informal presentations, where time is not an issue.

However, if we are comparing the two, the most noticeable additional features are the countdown function (both as a digital clock and as a visually prominent time bar) as well as the change of colour as the presenter nears the end of their time slot. Another important advantage is that multiple presenter timings can be inserted within a presentation containing numerous presenters. In this way each presenter can see their time slot and the number of slides specific to their presentation which isn't possible with Presenter View.

Categories: add-in, delivery, interviews, powerpoint

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Among the four animation types in PowerPoint, we have already explored Entrance animations. The second type of animation is called Emphasis animation, and this animation type determines how the slide object moves while it is on the slide. For example, you can change a text object's font size, make it spin, or even cause it to flicker. Of course, animation effects such as changing font size, spin, or flicker are just a few of the many Emphasis animation effects in PowerPoint.

Explore Emphasis animations in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Monday, March 26, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Even though PowerPoint has been considered as a slide program, it is also a great drawing program that can in many ways be more easier to use than full-fledged illustration programs. Agreed, PowerPoint is not that full featured as far as drawing goes, but sometimes quick and easy is all you need! In this tutorial, you will learn how to draw a tree with just two simple shapes in PowerPoint 2011.

Learn how to draw a quick tree using default shapes in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

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Friday, March 23, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



PowerPoint provides several types of animations -- the first of these animation types is the Entrance animation. Entrance animations determine how the slide object appears on the slide. You can make your slide object fly in from the side or fade in, or both. Of course, both Fly In and Fade are just two of the many Entrance animation effects in PowerPoint.

Explore Entrance animations in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Thursday, March 22, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



You have already learned how to draw a parabola in PowerPoint 2011. In this tutorial you will learn how to draw a hyperbola using the available PowerPoint drawing tools. So, what is a hyperbola -- it is essentially composed of a smooth curve that is not too different from a parabola, but this smooth curve also has a mirrored image of itself so that the finished shape looks like two infinite bows.

Learn how to draw a hyperbola in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



In one of our previous tutorials, you learned what animation is (and where you should draw the limits as far as animation goes). In this tutorial, let us get started with showing you how many types of animation effects are available within PowerPoint 2010. When we say "many types", we do not mean the animation effects themselves but the several types wherein these effects can be categorized. All animation in PowerPoint can be divided into four types.

Learn about the different types of animation available in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Tuesday, March 20, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Guides form a moveable grid on your slide that can be altered -- multiple guides can be added or deleted as per the design requirements of your slide. We have already explained how you can make guides visible on your PowerPoint slide, and how you can add multiple guides. Guides have snap options turned on by default -- so you cannot turn snapping to guides on or off. Once the guides are made visible on the slide, all objects that venture close enough to them snap. Along with rulers, guides can help you position your slide objects with more precision.

Learn about how guides can help you in aligning your slide objects in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Monday, March 19, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Investment pyramids let you decide which investments are the most and least important facets of your portfolio. Typical investment portfolios use the classic pyramid diagram, but sometimes this may not work best – especially since the area available for text diminishes as you go from the base to the tip of the pyramid. This problem can be easily rectified by using another variant of the pyramid diagram available within the SmartArt graphics of PowerPoint. The Before example in this slide deck shows a typical pyramid, and the After example shows a slightly different pyramid diagram.



Download and use these slides for your own presentations.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, March 16, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Dinesh AwasthiDinesh Awasthi is Product Manager for authorSTREAM.com. In addition to developing the strategic product roadmap and implementation of various features on authorSTREAM, he works with the development team and keeps an eye on user feedback to formulate new releases. Dinesh holds a Masters degree in Computer Applications.

In this conversation, Dinesh discusses the new authorSTREAM mobile site.

Geetesh: Tell us about the new authorSTREAM mobile site, and how it will help users view and share presentations via their mobiles better?

Dinesh: Our new authorSTREAM mobile site lets users search through presentations and view any presentation right from their mobile phones, anytime and anywhere. We've tailor-made the site for the smaller screens of mobile devices and have added Facebook Like, Google +1, Twitter buttons for users to easily share the presentations.



Users don’t have to switch from mobile phone to desktop computer or laptop, they can view authorSTREAM presentations shared by their friends or colleagues on smartphones.

Geetesh: What are the benefits of showing presentations off smartphones compared to tablets and desktops – and how does the new authorSTREAM mobile site take advantage of these benefits? Also will the presentations work on mobiles that do not support Flash?

Dinesh: Smartphones are handy and easily accessible. Everyday hundreds and millions of people check email and browse Internet and access content from their smartphones.

Our idea of bringing presentations to smartphones was to give our users a quick access to their presentations on authorSTREAM. So they could run and share their presentations without switching platforms.

Whether it’s an impromptu meeting, or event, users can now view and share their presentations from their phones anytime and anywhere. Even the private presentations in their inbox run on the smartphones.

authorSTREAM presentations work on all devices that do not support Flash, including iPhone and iPad. Currently, we do not support animations, sound and other special effects. Considering that the use of these effects makes a slide show interactive, we would soon be adding these capabilities for Android compatible devices.

See Also: Share PowerPoint Presentations on authorSTREAM: Conversation with Dinesh Awasthi.



Categories: authorstream, interviews, online_presentations, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



In one of our previous tutorials, we explored what animation is, and guidelines to follow before you add an animation to a slide object within PowerPoint. PowerPoint allows you to animate any slide object that can be selected on your slide -- these include pictures, shapes, text, bulleted lists, SmartArt graphics, charts, etc. Once the animation is applied to your slide object, you can tweak how the objects on your slides appear, move, and disappear. However, you must first add an animation to the slide object.

Learn how to add animation to a slide object in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Thursday, March 15, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Jay WilderJay Wilder is director of product marketing at Brainshark, Inc. Brainshark’s cloud-based software lets users create online and mobile video presentations -- using simple business tools like PowerPoint and the telephone -- and then share and track their content. Thousands of companies use Brainshark to improve the reach and results of their business communications, while also dramatically reducing costs.

In this conversation, Jay discusses new features and functionality in SlideShark -- the free app from Brainshark that solves the problem of PowerPoint’s incompatibility on the iPad.

Geetesh: What are the new features in SlideShark v1.5, and how do these help users get more from their presentation content?

Jay: We're thrilled to add a number of ground-breaking new features and functionalities to the latest version of the app, which is the fifth major update since its launch last October. SlideShark v1.5 now includes the following features:

  • Share presentations: Users can now easily share links to online versions of their presentations by email or social media channels (including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) from the app or their online account for on-demand viewing on any device.

    SlideShark Share Feature

  • Track results: Instant email notifications alert users when their shared on-demand presentations are viewed. SlideShark Plus and Team Edition users also receive details on who viewed which slides, in what order and when.

  • Re-order slides: The ability to re-order slides by tapping and moving them to the desired location lets users tailor presentations for specific audiences, complementing SlideShark’s existing hide/un-hide slides feature.

  • Search for presentations: Users have easy, instant access to specific content by using the new search functionality to locate presentations in their account.

  • Select favorites: By tapping the star icon next to a presentation, users are able to select and filter their favorites for convenient access to the presentations they use most often.

  • Delete content: Users can delete files from their online account from the iPad, freeing up additional storage space as needed while on-the-go.

  • Expanded file support: In addition to supporting .PPT and .PPTX files, the app now supports .PPS and .PPSX file types.

  • Team Edition Administration via iPad: SlideShark Team Edition administrators can now easily log into their account from the app on the iPad by tapping "administration."

By providing these new features, SlideShark v1.5 offers users an enhanced experience by allowing users to both share and track content. Additional content management capabilities also allow users to take advantage of new accessibility and organizational functionality.

Geetesh: Two of the significant new features in SlideShark v1.5 are the sharing and tracking capabilities –- can you tell us more about these features?

Jay: Yes, absolutely. The sharing capability allows users to easily share PowerPoint presentations via email or social media channels, which can be viewed on-demand from any device –- including computers, iPads and other tablets and smartphones. This capability is critical for users who want to share important business content anytime and anywhere, whether it's before a meeting for preparation purposes or after a meeting as a leave-behind.

In addition, with the tracking capability Slideshark offers, users are instantly notified by email when their presentations are viewed and as a paid upgrade option, SlideShark Plus and SlideShark Team Edition users receive additional details on who viewed the presentations, which slides they viewed, in what order and when. By offering this feature, users can now gain valuable insight into how their content is being consumed in order to conduct both effective and timely follow-up.

We're very excited to offer both of these unique features and look forward to continuing to add valuable capabilities to SlideShark to further enhance our users' experience of properly playing PowerPoints from their iPads.

Existing SlideShark users can update to the current version via the Apple App Store -– and new users can sign up for a free account or start a free, 60-day trial of SlideShark Team Edition by visiting www.slideshark.com.

Categories: brainshark, interviews, ipad, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



When static guides are enabled in any presentation, they show up in the same position on all other slides. You'll find that only two Static guides (one horizontal and one vertical) are visible at first, and these two guides intersect at the center of the slide. Most of the time, this might work for you, but to help you in positioning slide objects better across successive slides, you can add more guides.

Learn how to add more guides in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Art HoldenArt Holden has been in the animation and presentation industry since 1996. He helped start Animation Factory in 1997 and served as general manager of Animation Factory for thirteen years. He currently lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA and works with PresenterMedia, a media content creating company.

In this conversation, Art discusses the media content available from PresenterMedia.

Geetesh: Tell us about your PresenterMedia collection of clip media and templates for PowerPoint.

Art: PresenterMedia is an ever growing library of professionally designed PowerPoint templates, animated clips, video backgrounds and presentation clip art. We specialize in unique 3D imagery much of which is animated for increased impact.



Geetesh: We noticed a cool recoloring option on your site that lets you change colors, sizes, and even file formats for any clip -- tell us more about how this evolved?

Art: One very unique aspect of our library is nearly all of our media can be customized in one way or another. As an example, all of our clip art can be adjusted to match the color theme of your presentation before you download it. So if your presentation is built with a cool blue theme you can match the clip art you download to the blue hues of your presentation.

This has become a popular feature on PresenterMedia and we are adding several exciting new customization feature in the near future.



See Also: PresenterMedia: Conversation with Art Holden

Categories: clip_media, design, interviews, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



When your PowerPoint presentation is digitally signed and shared, it helps to validate your identity. However, at times you may want to remove a digital signature attached to your PowerPoint presentation for several reasons -- you may want it to be signed by someone else, or maybe there's no need to for a particular presentation to be signed any more. A digital signature can be easily removed from your presentation.

Learn how to remove a digital signature from a presentation in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, security, tutorials

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Tuesday, March 13, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



All of last week, I attended multiple sessions at an international conference. Most of these sessions had slides -- and each slide was emotive, in some way or the other. Some slides were captivating, some held attention, and some evoked curiosity. There were other slides that evoked curiosity of another kind -- of why the text on the slides was so tiny that the audience could not read, some slides had white text on a yellow background -- that again could not be read. Slides do evoke emotions, but all emotions may not be fired by the program used to create the slides. In many ways, projector technology may have improved by leaps and bounds, but it still does not come close to the capabilities of today's LED screens. Thus white text on a deep yellow background may actually be completely readable on an LED screen, but washed out when projected. This washed out result does evoke an emotion as far as the audience is concerned, and that emotion is rarely positive.

Read the newsletter here.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Like rulers, guides in PowerPoint allow you to position and snap your slide objects in place. When you enable guides in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac, you see one horizontal and one vertical guide. Typically, these guides are blue in color. To enable these guides, you choose the View | Guides | Static Guides option.

Learn about viewing and hiding guides in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Monday, March 12, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



John BevanJohn Bevan from BrightCarbon has over eight years’ experience in creating compelling, clear, and persuasive visual presentations. John has recently helped to develop Visual Conversations for iPad – a service designed to create effective material for sales teams using iPad. John is based out of Singapore, but also works with companies in Europe and the USA.

In this conversation, John discusses the specialized needs of iPad capable presentations.

Geetesh: How is designing presentations for the iPad different than doing it within PowerPoint or Keynote on the desktop?

John: Form follows function -– you need to consider how and where the presentation is going to be used, and I think when we look at the role that iPads are starting to play in meetings, there are a few important considerations.

If you're using animation in the slides (which you certainly should be), then you need a way to get them to run properly. Most converters out there either turn presentations into a series of static images or a self-running MP4 movie. So you either lose the compelling quality of the slide builds, or you need to keep pausing and restarting -- both of which can make it very difficult to keep the flow going. Fortunately SlideShark appears to have solved the problem and we're looking forward immensely to seeing how that platform evolves.

With that in mind, slide builds are a really important attribute of any iPad presentation. If you can pace the flow of information to the audience by showing information building up on the slide in a sequence, then you can compel people to keep watching –- a bit like they do in the movies, where there is always something happening. Every presentation is different, but if you can make something change on the screen every 20-30 seconds then you've probably got the balance right.

In terms of graphics, obviously the iPad's display is far more reliable than that of projectors, but the old common-sense guidelines about minimum font sizes of 20 or 24 point and decent contrast ratios should still apply. Design has some room to evolve – we're starting to move away from the traditional 'framed' background designs and title bars, and using the screen real estate more dynamically.



But I think the most interesting difference is the entirely new conversational dynamic that the iPad brings to meetings. Suddenly, instead of presenting for twenty minutes with a linear, structured deck of slides, you can have a range of visual stories, visual explanations, visual calculation tools, and visual demonstrations up your sleeve. Depending on how the conversation unfolds, you could open up a slide to explain something, or pass the iPad over for the other person to draw something or interact directly with your content. That’s a much more natural way to share ideas, it lets you build rapport faster, get closer to your audience and engage with them at a much deeper level.

Geetesh: What services does BrightCarbon offer that lets presenters be equipped with more compelling, iPad optimized presentations?

John: We think conversational presenting is the future, so we offer a Visual Conversations for iPad service to really open up the full potential of the device. We develop a set of presentation topics –- non-linear presentation content as well as interactive materials like polls, sketchbooks, and custom calculators that can be opened up and used at key points during the conversation. Imagine just pulling up a couple of slides that exactly relate to a pain point your prospect just mentioned, then handing them a 'wish list' survey to complete which you can save and review later, sketching a development timeline together, and then letting them play with an app that shows them their projected ROI. You’re using interactive visuals that actually support and enhance each unique conversation. People appreciate and enjoy that degree of interaction and participation, they open up more, and so you can learn more about their situation and what they need.

We also include iPad optimization as standard on all our Presentation Creation packages, for when people still need a linear presentation that they might try presenting on iPad when the opportunity comes up. So we'll make sure the slides display correctly and present clearly on the small screen, and use animations that translate well to the iPad too. We also provide customers with instructions and recommendations on how to deploy the presentation onto iPads to make sure they're off to the right start.

See Also:
01: iPad Presenting - First Questions First
02: Presenter’s View in PowerPoint on iPad
03: Air Display - Conversation with Dave Howell
04: Add an Apple TV
05: What is AirPlay?
06: Connecting a TV or Projector to Apple TV
07: Wired iPad to VGA with the Apple Digital AV Adapter
08: Business use of Tablet Computing Surges
09: Picture Slides on the iPad

Categories: interviews, ipad, keynote, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



In a previous tutorial, you learned how you can create a self-signed digital certificate outside PowerPoint, and then mark this as a trusted certificate. This way you can create multiple trusted or non trusted certificates, and use them within PowerPoint or even other Microsoft Office applications. Although these certificates can be used in PowerPoint, you cannot remove these certificates from within PowerPoint. In this tutorial you'll learn how to remove any of the certificate(s) from the system, through Microsoft's Internet Explorer web browser -- note that once a certificate is removed, it will be not available to be used within PowerPoint or any other Microsoft Office application.

Learn how to remove digital certificates in Internet Explorer.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, security, tutorials

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Saturday, March 10, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



These animated ornaments are all shapes created with the Combine Shapes commands in PowerPoint. These have then been colored with fills, and grouped to form distinctive ornaments. All ornaments are colored in Theme aware fills – so if you add this slide to any other presentation, the ornaments will be automatically recolored in the colors of the new presentation! Finally, the ornaments have been animated to spin and move in motion paths.



Download and use this slide for your own presentations.

Categories: animation, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, March 09, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



PDF Converter Elite is an application that enables you to do two types of PDF related tasks. First of all, it can create PDFs from any file on your computer. More importantly though, and something that we will explore in this review is the second ability that PDF Converter Elite has up its sleeve – it can convert existing PDFs into popular Microsoft Office file formats such as PowerPoint, Word, Excel, Publisher, HTML and more. In this review we'll explore how you can convert a PDF to a PowerPoint presentation.

Learn about PDF Converter Elite, a PDF creation and converter product that also enables you to convert a PDF file back into a PowerPoint presentation.

Categories: add-in, pdf, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



You have already learned about the line drawing tools such as line, curve, freeform, and scribble. With these line tools, you can draw almost anything in PowerPoint that you normally would draw in a high-end illustration program. In this tutorial, let us explore how to draw a parabola in PowerPoint 2011 using the Curve drawing tool. First of all, what is a parabola? Technically, it is a conic section -- but to make it easier for you, we'll ask you to visualize the McDonald's logo with just one conic section rather than two.

Learn how to draw a parabola in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, shapes, tutorials

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Thursday, March 08, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Does this large, illuminated letter look familiar? It should. The style has been around ever since medieval times to mark the beginning of a new document. It has continued on into modern publishing where an enlarged first letter marks the beginning of chapters in books and the beginnings of articles in magazines and newspapers. Now it becomes a factor in how we view computer screens.

EyeTrackShop, an eponymous Swedish start-up company, does exactly what its name says: track eye movements to, as their slogan puts it, "identify where people look, for how long and in what order." Using webcams to follow and record how viewers perceive images, the company's technology helps advertisers create effective ads and web designers create effective web pages. By understanding the dynamics of how viewers perceive ads and web pages, you can create effective graphics for your presentations.

One of EyeTrackShop's projects studied how users viewed the homepages of Facebook and Google+. The results, shown in the "Fixation Order" charts below and reported in the Wall Street Journal, found that in both cases, "Users' eyes head straight for the big status column in the middle of the screen, then over to the list of categories on the left side, then hop across to alerts on the right."

Fixation Order
Courtesy of EyeTrackShop*

Those movements are driven by forces more powerful than the images on the Google and Facebook sites, two forces that drive the eyes of every human being:

Nurture: In Western culture, because we have learned to read from left to right, our eyes always start reading at the upper left corner of documents.

Nature: The optic reflexes in all human eyes impel them to take in new images, and so, having started at the upper left, readers’ eyes naturally—and involuntarily—move to the right.

As a result, human eyes do essentially what the eyes of the subjects in the EyeTrackShop study did: after centering on the full image, they move to the upper left to start reading, and then sweep across to the right to continue reading. Therefore, whenever you click to a new slide, your audience’s eyes start reading at the upper left of the screen and sweep across to the right.

If your slide is densely packed with images, numbers, and/or text, your audience's eyes will not see the entire image on the first rightward move; they will have to come back to the left and go back to the right again. The denser the slide, the more times your audience's eyes will have to traverse the screen, the more traverses they make, the less they will hear of what you are saying.

Do you see where this is going? Back to the familiar Less is More principle, and this new added corollary: Reduce the number of moves your audience's eyes must make to understand your slide.

Apply this basic approach to the two most common slides in presentations today: text and bars.

  • Avoid wordwrap in text
  • Eliminate left axes in bar charts
You saw these principles applied in a prior blog, but they’re worth another look:

Eye Slide

Feel how your eyes naturally take in each slide: they start at the left and swing to the right.

Do the same for all your presentations. Design effective slides by reducing the number of eye moves your audiences must make.

Minimize the processing their eyes—and their brains—must do. Let them spend their energy and time focused on you.

* Fixation Order Courtesy of EyeTrackShop, All Rights Reserved.



Jerry WeissmanJerry Weissman is among the world's foremost corporate presentations coaches. His private client list reads like a who's who of the world's best companies, including the top brass at Yahoo!, Intel, Intuit, Cisco Systems, Microsoft, Netflix and many others.

Jerry founded Power Presentations, Ltd. in 1988. One of his earliest efforts was the Cisco Systems IPO road show. Following its successful launch, Don Valentine, of Sequoia Capital, and then chairman of Cisco's Board of Directors, attributed "at least two to three dollars" of the offering price to Jerry's coaching. That endorsement led to more than 500 other IPO road show presentations that have raised hundreds of billions of dollars in the stock market.

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