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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: June 2012

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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PowerPoint Text Effects - 04

Saturday, June 30, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



We have brought together 12 different text effects for you to use with any text in PowerPoint 2007, 2010 or higher on Windows (and also PowerPoint 2008, 2011 or higher on Mac). The sample presentation contains these Text effects in varieties of styles. Some of them may work better with only larger text – play around to see which one of these works for you. Of course none of these effects are suitable for body text, so you can use them for headings, such as slide titles. Copy the formatting of required sample text with the Format Painter, and then click on your text where you want to copy these effects.



Download and copy these text effects to use them in your own presentations.

Categories: powerpoint, presentation_samples, text

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Friday, June 29, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Why do presenters in business believe that they need to be monotone, without affect or emphasis? What is wrong with showing a little emotion when you are speaking? "No, no!" too many presenters respond. "Although I don't want to be monotone, I just can't get too emotional."

Being emotional does not mean becoming a drama queen (or king). It means matching your face, body, phrasing, and gestures to your words. For example, when you are telling your audience about the failure of a research project, you certainly shouldn't be walking around smiling, speaking in a loud and enthusiastic voice. If you did, your method of delivery wouldn't match your message. If, on the other hand, you are selling a product to a company that can really use it, you do need to smile, emphasize the relevant points of the product, and use phrases like, "I really believe this product will help you achieve some of your key goals."

How should you, as a presenter, convey the positive emotions that will capture your audience? Here are some suggestions.

  1. Excitement, enthusiasm: Gleam in your eyes, gestures, faster-paced talk.
  2. Happiness, pleasure: Smile on your lips and in your eyes, emphasis on certain words, silences between sentences so your audience can feel your happiness.
  3. Curiosity: Questions asked with an inquisitive tone of voice, open gestures, pauses to give your audience time to think about what you are saying.
  4. Confidence, self-assurance: Smiling, using your body as you talk.
  5. Empathy, understanding: Leaning forward to talk, having silence between your thoughts so you audience can respond.
  6. Commitment: Stating what you will do in a positive, upbeat voice tone.

Claudyne WilderClaudyne Wilder coaches executives, managers, and salespeople on how to deliver presentations that get to the message. Her clients give compelling, passionate presentations. Her company has an ongoing contract to give her Get to the Message: Present with a Purpose workshop at a Fortune 100 Global Pharmaceutical Company. Claudyne brings a unique and invigorating perspective to her work from her years of studying the Argentine Tango.

Do visit Claudyne's site at Wilder Presentations to sign up for her blog, her tweets or to download some free presenting tools.

Categories: guest_post, opinion

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



We have already explored what animation is, and what are the guidelines to be considered before you add an animation to a slide object within PowerPoint. You can animate any slide object that is selectable on your slide -- these slide objects include pictures, shapes, text, bulleted lists, SmartArt graphics, charts, etc. Once the slide object is animated, you can tweak the animation to control how the slide object appears, moves, and disappears in the Slide Show view. Before you tweak, you must first add an animation to the slide object.



Learn how to add animation to a slide object in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: animation, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Thursday, June 28, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Cliff Atkinson sent me a copy of the third edition of his Beyond Bullet Points book, and when you open the book, you'll find that the obvious change in this new edition is a whole new chapter right at the beginning which talks about how a multi-million dollar court case was won by using the principles discussed in Cliff's Beyond Bullet Points book.

Beyond Bullet PointsTo paraphrase the entire case in a few small paragraphs can be a challenge -- let me try – and of course, you can get a copy of Cliff's book to read this entire incident in full detail.

Merck & Co., a well-known pharmaceutical company developed and marketed a drug called Vioxx. Vioxx was marketed as something that would help those affected by arthiritis as a pain relief drug. It was found later that Vioxx could also cause fatal heart attacks -– you can read more about the Vioxx debacle on USA Today’s site.

One of the victims was Bob Ernst, whose wife Carol sued Merck. Carol's lawyer, Mark Lanier worked with Cliff to use the principles outlined in the Beyond Bullet Points book to create a compelling presentation to convince the jury -- something that played a pivotal part in Carol winning the case in a court in Angleton, TX. The presentation program used was Microsoft PowerPoint, and as an outcome of the case, the court ordered a compensation of $253 million. A few years later, this case is still pending, but that's not the reason behind this post –- the reason behind this post is that an outcome of this huge scale was possible in the first place, and it was a victory for those who use presentation software such as PowerPoint in the legal domain.

I asked Cliff about the use of his Beyond Bullet Points approach for presentations in the legal domain, and this is what he says:

I had originally written the Beyond Bullet Points book for a business audience, so I was surprised when a trial attorney approached me to ask my help in applying the approach to an opening statement for a big legal trial. But he won a $253 million verdict and attributes a large part of the success to his blockbuster presentation, which even made headlines in The New York Times and Fortune magazine. In retrospect I can see why attorneys are so interested in investing tremendous resources on their presentations – they win or lose their cases based on how effectively they communicate their message to their audiences. Because of this context, trial attorneys have much to teach presenters in all professions – especially in terms of the arts and sciences of the psychology, persuasion and physiology of communicating to audiences during high-stakes presentations.

Thank you so much, Cliff!


Cliff AtkinsonCliff Atkinson is an acclaimed writer, popular keynote speaker, and an independent consultant to leading attorneys and Fortune 500 companies. He designed the presentations that helped persuade a jury to award a $253 million verdict to the plaintiff in the nation's first Vioxx trial in 2005, which Fortune magazine called "frighteningly powerful." Cliff's bestselling book Beyond Bullet Points (now in its 3rd edition) was named a Best Book of 2007 by the editors of Amazon.com, and it expands on a communications approach he has taught at many of the country's top law firms, government agencies, business schools and corporations.

Categories: books, legal, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



In this series of tutorials on working with videos in PowerPoint 2010, you have already learned about correction adjustments for videos, recoloring video clips, and applying Video Styles, Video Effects, Video Shapes, and Video Borders that can help you enhance the look of your inserted videos. These options will make your video clips look better and focused -- and will provide you with ideas to make your video clips stand apart. Yet, there are some very basic video editing options that can be even more significant. These include how you can resize, rotate, and flip your inserted video clips. Resizing can help you change dimensions of your video clips, while slight changes in rotation values can draw attention. Flip, the last of these options though is something you will almost never use -- unless you want to do something drastically different!



Learn how you can Resize, Rotate, and Flip video clips in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials, video

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Wednesday, June 27, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



The businesswoman silhouettes that you are going to get within the download presentation are ready to use within your PowerPoint presentation slides. They have been provided in both black and white colors -- both variations are contained within two separate slides in one presentation that you can download. To start with, you can also use other sample variations in the presentation you will download. These are applied with different fills and effects. Later, you can make these silhouettes appear coordinated with your slides using PowerPoint’s fills, lines, and effects.



Copy the silhouettes graphics (clip arts) of your choice from the downloaded presentation, and paste them into your PowerPoint presentation slides. All these silhouette graphics can be used and customized with Shape Styles just like any other PowerPoint shape. You can also paste them into a Word document, an Excel worksheet, or any other program.

Download and use this presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Pattern fills are the last of the various fill options for slide backgrounds we have explored to use in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac. Patterns in PowerPoint are two-color designs comprising lines, dots, dashes, checks, etc. PowerPoint includes 48 such patterns with names like Plaid, Weaves, Shingle, and Zigzag. This tutorial builds upon what you have already learned in the Format Slide Background tutorial, and shows how you can use pattern fills for your slide background.



Learn how to apply pattern fills as slide backgrounds in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: background, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Tuesday, June 26, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 11:00 AM IST



Being part of several groups and forums means that I get to know about the problems that everyday users face with their PowerPoint and presenting skills. Some topics end up being discussed repeatedly, and bring forth many opinions that differ, overlap, or even agree with each other. One of these is the debate about whether you should use bullet points in PowerPoint or not -- and that is indeed a Pandora's box, so we will leave that one aside for today! Another topic that gets discussed is the use of PowerPoint to create printed slides on paper -- these printed slides are circulated to an audience before the presentation begins -- needless to add, most of these slides are not projected and very rarely are these presentations given to an audience that comprises more than a handful of people.

Read this issue of our weekly newsletter.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Once you insert a video in your slide, you can crop it in almost the same way you crop a picture. Before you crop though, you must ascertain whether PowerPoint's Crop option will help create a better result for your inserted video. The Crop option allows you to remove not-required areas of a video -- for example, if the subject of your video is a person speaking who is surrounded by a large, distracting background of other people or moving objects, you may want to crop the video so that the cropped video now focuses more on the speaker, and gets rid of all the extra distractions. Note that cropping a video does not trim the timings of the video playback in any way – in fact trimming is a completely different option that will be explored in another tutorial. In the following tutorial, we will explore how you can crop a video clip.



Learn how crop a video clip in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials, video

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Monday, June 25, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Tom BunzelTom Bunzel specializes in knowing what other presenters need and how to make technology work. He has appeared on Tech TV's Call for Help as "Professor PowerPoint", and is a featured speaker at industry events each year. Tom is also a "technology coach" and does presentation and video consulting in southern California. Tom's new eBook, Presence of Mind: Journey to a New Operating System is now available online. You can also visit his site, The Presentation Professor and his BunzBlog blog.

In this conversation, Tom discusses how you should create a new presentation from scratch, and also his new book.

Geetesh: How do you approach creating a new presentation? Can you share some thoughts?

Tom: Sure. I think the best way to approach a presentation is like I imagine writing a mystery novel would be—from the ending first. In a mystery you devise a plot with a powerful ending that amazes the reader; in a presentation you figure out what the final outcome will be: for sales a call to action; for training, the ability to manage a task; for an inspirational talk, a deep message of change.

When you know the ending you can begin to strategize how to get there. You want to reach different kinds of audiences—rational thinkers may respond to facts while many people believe that they’re rational but they may respond to emotions like fear (not my favorite) or adventure and opportunity to thrive, or to overcome an obstacle.

So then you want to build your story toward your inevitable conclusion using the various building blocks you've got—and then you would inventory your creative media assets in this regard—including text (strong simple statements), pictures (metaphors and allegories), video (supporting narrative) and perhaps even music (emotional tone).

Finally you would want your presentation to be in a context—as part of a larger matrix of communication—in today's environment. In my book Tools of Engagement: Presenting and Training in a World of Social Media, I maintain that presentations today must be conversations, because today's audiences expect context. They want access to the presenter before and after an event, in terms of researching their qualifications and also getting to know them personally. That’s why so many of today's presentations are part of an overall social strategy that include programs like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn online, along with webinars and blogs, all around the staple of a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation. A presentation used to be a single event and a broadcast by someone in authority on a podium or with a projector; now if it's not part of a larger conversation it is often ignored amid the immense amount of compelling information out there.

Geetesh: You often mention TED Talks – can you share a few of your favorites, and what you liked best about them?

Tom: My life actually changed in 2007 when I viewed a video by geneticist Juan Enriquez on TED.com in which he describes how altering the genome results in a different species, and how an "apple is an application; when the sun hits it the program executes, and the apple falls from the tree."

At the time I was thinking of writing a science fiction story in which a computer program was discovered in the brain which made people realize that we were the product of a higher intelligence—that we didn’t need to search of "intelligent life" in the universe—it was inside of us.

Well, Enriquez's video made me realize this wasn't science fiction—it's the truth. With DNA, we now know that the instructions that control our breathing, digestion, circulation, and all life are essentially organic programs (genetics and epigenetics) that operate literally as computer programs (not merely functions that are allegorically similar or work analogously to computer programs). All of life is processing information every microsecond.

What does this suggest? Well for one thing, we can literally "cut and paste" Life – it's been done as we move the code from one organism to another and change its "properties" and "methods" – terms that computer programmers will understand.

But we must also deeply consider the obvious fact that computer programs (like Word and PowerPoint) did not "evolve" – they were designed by teams of programmers with conscious and intelligent intention to perform tasks and serve a purpose.

Of course in our modern world this brings up the issue of fundamentalism and Intelligent Design; but I think that is a false dichotomy—the conflict with modern science.

Modern science is coming up against the reality of consciousness and the intelligence of nature all the time—in quantum mechanics and also in astrophysics and mathematics. (Our supercomputers which sequenced the genome have "found" (calculated) the largest prime number—but obviously in nature there “is” a larger number beyond that)….

I believe that computer programs are pointing all of us to a higher truth—that the universe we inhabit is much greater in scale than what we currently understand, and even science (if we don't blow ourselves up) is on the verge of discovering a higher level of intelligence in nature.

"God" is just a word or placeholder—I think of it as the ultimate variable in computer programming. But we are on the verge of either transcending our current view of our own nature (and the universe), or going extinct as a species.

Sorry to go on the soapbox. But we act like we completely understand and control nature, and if you look around, you can see the results.

A more recent video on TED was a talk about How algorithms shape the world, by Ken Slavin, who describes how computers operating at speeds unfathomable to humans are manipulating our economic system in ways we don't even comprehend. Well, again, algorithms are apparent in nature – the Fibonacci sequence (or Golden Mean) for example is mathematical perfection manifest almost everywhere you look. It's hard to recognize this, and not realize with a certain reverence that much greater intelligence has been present much longer than we have—we've had the personal computer for almost 50 years; DNA has been running for billions of years.

These are some of the questions I am currently dealing with, and they're not always comfortable, but I think we delude ourselves if we avoid confronting them. So at the moment I am trying to cross the barriers between computer technology, psychology and religion.

See Also: Tools of Engagement: Conversation with Tom Bunzel

Categories: books, interviews, opinion, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



In this series of tutorials on slide background fills, you have already explored various slide background styles available in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac: you have learned about solid, gradient, picture, and texture fills for slide backgrounds. When you use texture fills for your slide backgrounds, you need not limit yourself to only the default textures that PowerPoint offers. You can always explore some custom textures such as our own Ppted Background Texture Collection. Also some pictures lend themselves better to being used as textures, especially if they are seamless. In this tutorial you will learn how to use custom textures for your slide background fills.



Learn how to use custom texture fills for your slide backgrounds in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: background, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Saturday, June 23, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Silhouettes are amazing, and yet so practical to use. They don't tell too much and yet that is sometimes just what you need. Here are some businesspeople silhouettes ready to use within your PowerPoint presentation slides. In the sample PowerPoint presentation that you will download, you will find these silhouettes in both black and white colors, contained within two separate slides. You will also find one more slide that contains some variations of these businesspeople silhouettes applied with some fills, lines, and effects, which will help you to start with. You can edit them further using PowerPoint’s fills, lines, and effects to make them appear coordinated with your slides.



Copy the silhouettes graphics (clip arts) of your choice from the downloaded presentation, and paste them into your PowerPoint presentation slides. All these silhouette graphics can be used and customized with Shape Styles just like any other PowerPoint shape. You can also paste them into a Word document, an Excel worksheet, or any other program.

Download and use these silhouettes in your presentations.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, June 22, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



YouTube Video Wizard is a PowerPoint add-in that enables you to insert YouTube videos into a PowerPoint slide using just the YouTube video URL that appears in the browser address bar. This is much easier than following the official Microsoft process of inserting online videos -- and Microsoft's suggested option only works in PowerPoint 2010 or later. YouTube Video Wizard, on the other hand works in almost all Windows versions of PowerPoint. YouTube Video Wizard is from Shyam Pillai, a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP who creates several PowerPoint add-ins.



Learn about YouTube Video Wizard, a free add-in for PowerPoint 2010 which enables you to insert any YouTube video within PowerPoint.

Categories: add-in, powerpoint, youtube

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



When you insert a video clip within a PowerPoint slide, you'll find it placed as a traditional rectangular shape. And while that's exactly what most users expect, it does seem safe and conventional. However, PowerPoint 2010 does allow you to have your video playing in different shapes such as a circle or oval, or a wave, a triangle, or any of the shapes that PowerPoint includes. Just the fact that a video can be placed within a shape is no reason to forego the conventional rectangle -- do remember that most other shapes may crop out important parts of your video clips.



Learn how add shapes for videos in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials, video

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Thursday, June 21, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Tom KuhlmannTom Kuhlmann is VP, Community for Articulate, where he manages the Articulate user community. He also writes the Rapid E-learning Blog which is published weekly to over 95,000 readers. Tom has developed and managed e-learning courses for both large and small organizations. He’s passionate about learning technology and his core focus is on helping people succeed and grow. He is known throughout the industry for his practical, no-nonsense approaches to e-learning. He’s also a frequent speaker at ASTD and e-learning industry events. He has a Master’s in Education Technology from Pepperdine.

In this conversation, Tom discusses the new Articulate Storyline product.

Geetesh: What exactly does Storyline do, and what motivated Articulate to create Storyline?

Tom: Articulate Storyline is the authoring solution for those who build e-learning courses. You can create traditional e-learning & multimedia presentations as well as screencasts and software simulations.



In the past, creating rapid e-learning courses meant you needed an assortment of applications. Storyline removes this need because it's a more complete authoring solution that includes screencast videos, interactive simulations, and the ability to do more complex type learning interactions with variables. For those who work on small teams or by themselves and have a limited budget, Articulate Storyline's a great product because it doesn't require using multiple tools and it includes over 40 built-in characters and photos. This saves a lot of time and money.



The courses can be published in Flash, HTML5, and for the iPad. That means you can build traditional e-learning, mobile learning, and even mobile presentations. I really love the iPad output. It's very Flash-like and just looks cool. It's fun to build a quick demo, and show my friends what it looks like on the iPad.



In general, software applications are becoming more powerful and user expectations are becoming more sophisticated. The goal is always to make the software applications easier to use and add more capability. With rapid e-learning, much of the focus has been on PowerPoint-to-Flash conversions like Articulate Presenter. This is an excellent way to create e-learning, especially for those who know PowerPoint and don't know Flash. And PowerPoint's authoring capabilities are more sophisticated than most probably realize.


Examples of interactive e-learning built in PowerPoint

Frog Dissection
Security Course

The challenge with the PowerPoint-to-Flash publishing is crafting more complex learning. You give up a lot of programming control with PowerPoint so that means you don’t get even simple interactive elements like drag and drop, rollovers, and variables.

We have a generation of rapid e-learning developers who got their start in PowerPoint-to-Flash and now are ready to do more. The trick is building an application that is both easy to use and allows for more complexity. With Articulate Storyline you get that.

Geetesh: Can a newbie really create e-learning content using Articulate Storyline? Also will PowerPoint users be at ease, or will they need to unlearn some concepts?

Tom: Yes, what I find exciting about Articulate Storyline is that it's a tool that can grow with you. If you're a newbie, using Storyline is going to be almost as easy as using PowerPoint. That means you can jump right in and start creating courses, albeit simple courses.

Eventually your skills and expectations mature and you'll want to do more than basic e-learning. In that case, Articulate Storyline grows with you. The first course you build probably won't require variables. But eventually you'll want to do more sophisticated e-learning. With Storyline you won't need to change tools.



The challenge with some e-learning applications is that even if you want to build simple courses, you still have to learn a lot about all of the tool's features; thus using the tool is not easy at the onset and not necessarily intuitive. That's not the case with Articulate Storyline. The user interface has a very familiar feel. If you know your way around PowerPoint, then you'll feel at home in Articulate Storyline. This makes learning to build courses easier and much faster. You'll feel confident building that first course.



Another important feature for those transitioning from PowerPoint is that importing PowerPoint content into Storyline is really easy. And what you import can be edited in Storyline. So that means shapes remain shapes, text is editable, and any images or master files come in as well.

Geetesh: What about publishing to an iPad friendly format -- will a Storyline user need anything other than Storyline itself?

Tom: That's a good question. The iPad has taken the world by storm so there's a lot of emphasis on getting content onto the iPad. With Articulate Storyline it's really easy.



Articulate Storyline offers two options. The first is that you can publish to HTML5, and then view what you publish via the iPad's browser. As it is right now, HTML5 presents some challenges because each browser offers different capabilities. This is especially true with mobile Safari on the iPad. To provide the best user experience, we offer a free Articulate Mobile Player via the iTunes app store. The advantage of the Mobile Player is that what you create in Storyline is going to work the way you want it. You’re not going to be constrained by HTML5 and some of the current issues.

You can check out some of the examples below, and view the links on the iPad through the Articulate Mobile Player. It works great and the content looks like it belongs on the iPad. It doesn't have that blocky web page look that many HTML5 e-learning courses have.



Effective Meetings
Green Monster
DC Fundamentals

Another benefit of the Mobile Player is that you can allow the person to download the content onto the iPad. This means they can view it when they're not online. That's not an option if you run it over a network via HTML5.

Obviously I manage the Articulate community, but from the perspective of an e-learning enthusiast, I am very pleased with Articulate Storyline. Articulate's delivered a product that works both for beginners and experts. If you're just getting started, you have a tool that will grow with you. And if you're a seasoned rapid e-learning pro, Storyline offers a lot more capability than PowerPoint-to-Flash, but with a lot of PowerPoint comfort.

If you want to learn more about how easy it is to use, check out some of the Getting Started tutorials.

Or better yet, try the free 30 day download.

See Also:
Articulate, PowerPoint, and E-Learning: Conversation with Tom Kuhlmann
Articulate Presenter ’09: Conversation with Mark Schwartz
Categories: articulate, elearning, interviews, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



When you want to change the default look of your slide background, you can explore the various slide background styles available in PowerPoint. Other than these styles, you can certainly explore specific options that we have already covered: solid, gradient, or picture fills for slide backgrounds. In addition, you can also choose a texture fill for your slide background. Texture and picture fills for slide backgrounds have so much in common; the same picture can be used for both a texture or a picture fill -- the main difference is that while a picture background results in your slide using a single picture as a backdrop, using a texture background can result in the same picture being tiled across the slide background -- imagine a wallpaper on your room's wall with repeating motifs. Also some pictures lend themselves better to being used as textures, especially if they are seamless.



Learn how to apply texture fills as a slide background in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: background, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Wednesday, June 20, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Here are some more businessman silhouettes ready to use within your PowerPoint presentation slides - and these have been provided in both black and white colors. In the presentation that you download, you will find both variations contained within two separate slides. In addition, you will also find few more variations of these silhouette vectors applied with various fills and effects. You can use PowerPoint’s fills, lines, and effects to make these silhouette clip arts appear coordinated with your slides.



Copy the silhouettes graphics (clip arts) of your choice from the downloaded presentation, and paste them into your PowerPoint presentation slides. All these silhouette graphics can be used and customized with Shape Styles just like any other PowerPoint shape. You can also paste them into a Word document, an Excel worksheet, or any other program.

Download and use this presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

Labels: , ,

0 comments








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