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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: August 2012

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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PowerPoint 2013 Interface

Friday, August 31, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:40 AM IST



Here's a quick walkthrough of the PowerPoint 2013 interface -- the PowerPoint 2013 interface is quite similar, yet somewhat different than the interface of PowerPoint 2010. The biggest change is that PowerPoint 2013's interface is primed for use also on tablets, touch-screens, and phones (other than conventional desktops). Thus, you can swipe and tap your way through a presentation -- and also make several edits without the need of a cursor.



Explore a quick walkthrough of the PowerPoint 2013 interface that reveals some new features.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



This two segmented circle can be used in your slides to explain a concept or an idea – you can also find more similar segmented circle slides. Most of these conceptual designs have been created with basic PowerPoint shapes. Also, some of them are imported from other graphic programs and converted to PowerPoint shapes. In the sample presentation that you download, you’ll find segmented circles within two separate slides -- one with a picture fill, and the other with just a solid color fill. Copy these slides to your PowerPoint presentation, and change the fills and effects of individual segments as well as the thin donut shaped circle around the segment, using PowerPoint’s fills, fines, and effects. You can also try applying some animation to the circle segments.



Download and use this concept slide in your presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



An interactive PowerPoint presentation always interests audiences since it gets them involved actively navigating the slides. However, the audiences for whom these interactive slides are intended must be aware that some interactivity has been included so that they can click a slide object to cause an action to happen. With trigger animations, you click on a PowerPoint shape (or even an Action Button or any other slide object) to cause an audio or video clip on the same slide to play, pause, resume, or even stop.



Learn how to add trigger animations for sound and movie actions in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, sounds, tutorials, video

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Thursday, August 30, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Transition effects show a visual change when you move from one slide to another. Before you add any transition effect, your slides advance rather abruptly -- adding a transition effect like Fade, Wipe, or any of the other effects makes the flow between slides smoother to the eye and easier to the slide content. Although the purpose of transitions is to remove the abruptness of moving from one slide to another, you can actually do a slide transition without any effect -- in this case you will only add the transition so that you can add a transition time so that slides advance at determined timings. Finally, you can also add transition sounds.



Learn how to add transition effects to the slides in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, transitions, tutorials

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Wednesday, August 29, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Art HoldenArt Holden has been in the animation and presentation industry since 1996. He helped start Animation Factory in 1997, where he served as general manager for thirteen years. He currently lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA and works with PresenterMedia, a media content creating company.

In this conversation, Art discusses the new PowerPoint add-in from PresenterMedia that lets you search and insert visual content from within PowerPoint.

Geetesh: PresenterMedia's new PowerPoint add-in lets you search and insert clip media right from inside PowerPoint -- what motivated you to create this add-in?

Art: Creating a presentation can be time consuming and is often accompanied by stressful deadlines. We realized we could develop a tool that allows people to use PresenterMedia's unique content to create stunning presentations even faster and easier.

The PresenterMedia add-in for PowerPoint provides convenient access to our templates, animations and clipart directly from PowerPoint. This allows you to spend more time honing your message and less time worrying about the design.

PresenterMedia PowerPoint Add-in

Geetesh: The add-in also allows you to change hues, sizes, and even turn off shadows on graphics -- much like the abilities available on your site -- tell us about some user experiences based on these capabilities.

Art: Often times presentation designers are limited in the choice of color combinations they are able to use in a presentation, or they are striving to convey a particular mood. The ability to change and customize our animations, videos and clip art allows you to match your company colors or fit the image into your existing design theme.

Using our customization tools in the PowerPoint add-in allows our users to modify our images directly inside their presentation. It gives presentation designers more control at their fingertips, and it has been very popular with our current users.

PresenterMedia PowerPoint Add-in

See Also: PresenterMedia: Conversation with Art Holden | PresenterMedia Content: Conversation with Art Holden

Categories: add-in, clip_media, interviews, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Although PowerPoint (and Microsoft Office ) includes several Theme Fonts sets, you can take this concept further by creating your own custom Theme Fonts sets. When you create a custom Theme Fonts set, the new set will appear within the Custom section of the Fonts drop-down gallery. However, what do you do when you want to delete a Theme Fonts set because you made a mistake -- or if you have too many of these sets that you no longer use? Or let us assume that you have created several custom Theme Fonts sets, and you now need to copy them to a new computer, or even a friend's or colleague's system.



Learn how to share, edit, and delete the custom Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: fonts, powerpoint_2007, powerpoint_2010, themes, tutorials

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 11:57 AM IST



In this issue of the newsletter, we have an exclusive conversation with Martin Conradi, who discusses the future of presentations. We explore how you can create high quality videos from your PowerPoint slides using authorSTREAM. There’s an excellent post by James Smith on why you should not use 3D charts in your slides. And you get two concept slides to download and use in your presentations: a one segment circle as well as a second series of people chain silhouettes. We also have tutorials on using indent markers in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows, and the use of fonts in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Read the newsletter here.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



The main purpose of adding animation to any slide object is to draw the attention of the audience to some concept. After adding animation, you can set the animation event, and also the speed of the animation. To make it more interesting, you may also want some sound to play along with the animation. One aspect that you should always remember is that although you can add sound to an animation, it is not always necessary to do so -- we suggest you only add sound sparingly -- and even then, you must make sure that the sound adds some value to the animation. In addition, it is important that you use the perfect sound type for any animation -- using clapping or roaring sounds is very cliché. Now that we have made you aware about the caveats, let us go ahead and explore the actual procedure.



Learn how to add sound effects that accompany animations in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: animation, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, sounds, tutorials

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Monday, August 27, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Have your ever used keyboard shortcuts in PowerPoint? Or are you a complete keyboard aficionado? Do you want to learn about some new shortcuts? Or do you want to know if your favorite keyboard shortcuts are documented? Here's the most comprehensive list of PowerPoint 2011 keyboard shortcuts that we know about -- how many of these do you presently use? If you discover a shortcut key not listed here, please get in touch with us through our feedback form.



Learn about keyboard shortcuts you can use in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



It happens often that your boss, colleague, or friend sends you some content for your presentation. Rather than typing all that content, you may just copy it from their email and paste it within PowerPoint. The problem with this approach may stem from the fact that whoever sent you the content is one of those people who type everything in small case -- or maybe they just turn on the Caps Lock button and forget turning it off! Whatever the reason may be, you will end up with text that is certainly not useable on your slide. Rather than retyping the whole text again, you can use PowerPoint's Change Case option to quickly change the case of selected text on your slide.



Learn how to change text case to lowercase, uppercase, etc. in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: fonts, powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

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Saturday, August 25, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Here’s another slide set of the People Chain silhouette series. You get a People Pyramid silhouette graphic in addition to another variation of a People Chain line – this line has alternating persons in larger and smaller sizes. This is perfect to use in scenarios where teams sourced from different organization levels are involved. You can also use these silhouette graphics in presenting scenarios where you need to create slides related to the strength of unity and diversity, multi-racial staff, international groups, etc.



Download and use these silhouette graphics in your slides.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, August 24, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Martin ConradiMartin Conradi is managing director of Showcase Presentations in London. Educated at Oundle School and Lancaster University, he spent 10 years in advertising and marketing companies and doing more than his fair share of presentations. He became fascinated by the potential for small computers as business tools and set up Rainbow Software in 1980 -- probably the first company in the world entirely dedicated to computer-based business presentations. He formed Showcase Presentations Ltd in 1986 to specialise in computer-based presentation services.

In this conversation, Martin looks at the future of presentations, from a past perspective.

Geetesh: You've been involved with presentation software for a long, long time -- tell us more about the historical perspective and where you believe the future of presenting is headed to?

Martin: Imagine watching slides on a large monitor screen with a range of properly designed proportionally spaced fonts in rich RGB colour. When you want video, it switches in automatically. And you can print out the individual slides.

Familiar? But this was our Showcase Presentation System in 1981, the first such system in the world.

We used an Apple II (16k of RAM, a 1Mhz 8-bit processor and a pair of 5-1/2" floppy disc drives) which was in those days a pretty cool machine; we developed proportional fonts (long before the Mac); and discovered monitors capable of using RGB, so developed programmable cards to drive them. Add some great software and a remote control, and you had the world's first computer presentation system.

And with no rules for designing computer slides we had to invent them too.

Clients claimed the system paid for itself in a single presentation.

The advent of the PC with its very basic graphics slowly strangled the Apple II as a business purchase, so in 1985 we reinvented ourselves as a service company and after over 30 years, Showcase is still going strong. We switched to General Parametric's VideoShow -- an external graphics and presentation box for the PC -- and remained with this for the rest of the 1980s until the "clamshell" laptop, Windows 3 and Freelance appeared in the early 90's; it was time to switch again.

Since then nothing fundamental has changed. Of course both hardware and software are much more powerful while at the same time easier to use. Viable alternatives to PowerPoint have continued to emerge -- though mostly for only a short time. The trade-off between simplicity (for office users) and capability (for designers and other professionals) continues to tax software designers.

In 1970 I worked in a bright young ad agency and we put pictures and text on a rectangular screen to help get our arguments across to our audience. It cost a fortune and took 3 days to get the slides back. Now it costs virtually nothing to do the same thing in a few hours. The difference in the technology is huge, but the outcome is basically the same.

One advantage today is that the speaker can alter the presentation right up to the last moment but this is a double-edged sword. When presentations were slow and expensive, a lot of thought went into what was said and how it was presented. As the price of presentations has become negligible, the quality of thinking has all too often kept pace, and all the power and brilliance of the underlying technology which can produce marvels of insightful graphics to support a speaker, much too often delivers lazy argument, badly presented.

We did some research to understand better why people come to live presentations when they can often see them online much more easily. The answer was very clear: "We want to see the whites of their eyes".

So the speaker is still -- and will always be -- the centre of attention; presentations will become more visual, picture-driven rather than bullet-point driven. They may even become more interactive as a younger and more computer-literate generation of management, teachers, etc., rises through the ranks.

But in 10 years' time we will still be presenting; and the rectangular screen with words and pictures and a (mostly) live audience will still be the way to do it.

Geetesh: Presentation design moves at a much faster pace now than 10 or 20 years ago, and that clearly is an advantage -- but are there thoughts you would like to share about what we can do to make this process better now and in the future?

Martin: How often have you heard people leaving a presentation saying "great slides"? "Great speaker" yes, but "great slides", no.

A well-designed presentation -- like a well-designed book -- is in a sense invisible, subsumed into the unfolding story told by the presenter. A well-designed presentation helps makes any competent speaker look good -- thoughtful, considered and professional.

Badly designed slides confuse the audience and risk making the speaker appear muddled and not really in control of his subject.

Good presentation design is a compromise between three things: the needs for a presentation to look consistent and coherent and present a unified argument; the need for an individual slide to "work" despite the constraints of the presentation as a whole; and the inevitable real-life pressure of last-minute edits that can wreck the integrity of carefully worked slides.

Good presentations design -- like that well presented book is based on a set of rules for fonts, colors, layouts, pictures and so on. Templates and masters do a pretty good job with this provided they have been properly designed in the first place. This is easier said than done as very few designers know anything about presenting -- as a group they almost never do it; and they are trained and practised in designing for paper. Web designers are little better as their skill is in designing for individuals close up to and in control of their screens, not for audiences.

But as we move away (hopefully) from the era of the bullet point and "death by PowerPoint" into a more graphic and emotionally intelligent way of presenting, the conventional template will need to develop to be less bullet-based and more picture-oriented. What will be needed will be a way of finding pictures to replace words, of integrating conceptual search engines into the heart of the program to help the user come up with visual ideas. It is pictures rather than words that get remembered. As Generation Y moves up the business ladder, this sort of shift will accelerate.

Individual slides will always be (and of course should be) susceptible to breaking away from the template in order to be made to "work" better. And I am all in favour of the "money-shot" slide which stands out from the rest and defines the presentation visually. But you can have too much a good thing and as more and more slides are treated a specials, a presentation can quickly become incoherent. Maybe someone will come up with a "conform" button and a sliding scale that can bring the slide back -- intelligently and perhaps in small steps -- in line with the master.

Most speakers rightly develop their own content; but many will often undermine good ideas by insisting on putting too much on a page, as if quantity equates to depth. There will and never should be a mechanism for stopping people putting what they want on a slide. But less here is more, much more; progress will come from training, fashion and example -- the better TED presentations should be on every managers viewing list.

As for the speaker spoiling it all at the last moment, that is their privilege. I firmly believe that -- all things being equal -- a speaker who is happy with their slides will perform more confidently than one who feels uncomfortable with them. In the end it is always the speaker who matters most.

Because if they feel good, look good and enjoy what they do the audience generally will too.

See Also: That Presentation Sensation

Categories: interviews, opinion, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



In PowerPoint, you can effectively illustrate a concept, a process, or anything else using animation. But the fact that you should be aware of is, even though animation is movement and a fine art at the same time, there's a thin dividing line between mere movement and utter confusion. Imagine a training session where the presenter moves around the room explaining a concept -- as he or she moves, the eyes of the audience members follow him or her. There is a clear focus in the room, and the subject of that focus is the presenter. Now imagine another situation where the presenter and all the audience members in the room start moving in disparate directions just for the sake of movement -- at this point of time, the movement has given way to chaos. Thus movement needs to have focus and direction, and more importantly, a reason to move!



Learn to build and sequence animations in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: animation, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Thursday, August 23, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 2:15 PM IST



In this component of our Segment Circles series, we have brought you an non-segmented full circle. You can use this circle in your presentation like a picture container. We have used basic PowerPoint shapes to create most of these conceptual designs. Also, some of them are imported from other graphic programs and converted to PowerPoint shapes. The sample presentation that you download comprises one unsegmented circle within two separate slides -- one with a picture fill, and the other with just a solid color fill. Copy these slides to your PowerPoint presentation and change the fills and effects of individual segments as well as the thin donut shaped circle around the segment.



Download and use this concept slide in your presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You have already explored how you can use the First Line Indent Marker and the Hanging Indent Marker to tweak bulleted paragraphs in PowerPoint 2010. The next and last of these indent markers on the Ruler is the Left Indent Marker -- this acts like a lock on the First Line Indent Marker and the Hanging Indent Marker. Funnily enough, it is called the Left Indent Marker even though it is placed at right-most of the three markers!



Learn how to adjust the position of bulleted paragraphs using the Left Indent Marker in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

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Wednesday, August 22, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Anyone who has heard me speak about charts knows that I’m not a fan of three dimensional (3D) charts. Here are the reasons why.

All charts can present problems in conveying information if used improperly. What makes 3D charts unique is that their major problem is inherent in the chart design itself -- namely, the confusion induced by the depth of field effect.

Conveying a third dimension on a two dimensional surface creates difficulties for the eye and the brain. Just look at some of the fantastic optical illusions that prey upon the brain's bewilderment when confronted with a 3D simulated image on a 2D plane. When you try to get information from a three dimensional chart, you have to use mental gymnastics to make allowance for the depth of field effect. My first rule of chart design is that if you have to use any mental gymnastics on a chart to get the information you want, then it's not a good chart.

The first problem, evident even in a simple 3D clustered column chart (one or more data series all in the foreground), is that the brain automatically estimates the values of the columns from the grid in the background. Unfortunately, this gives a false reading since the actual height of the columns differs, sometimes appreciably, from the value read on the grid in the background.

In a true 3D column chart (with series data presented from foreground to background, see chart below), the confusion is even worse. First, observe the problem noted above. The tallest blue column visually aligns with the gridline for 50 in the background. Yet its actual value is 65.



A second problem is that it is difficult to compare the values of the different columns. The tallest blue column and the tallest green column appear at exactly the same height on the chart. Obviously the blue column is a higher value since it starts at a lower point on the chart but it is difficult to determine with any precision how much higher it is. You could, of course, use data labels to put the value at the top of each column but there are two problems with this, especially with multiple data series charts. First, if you label all the columns in a three dimensional chart of more than one data series, the chart is overly busy. Second, and more importantly, although the labels clearly show that one column is numerically greater than the other, visually there is poor confirmation of this. If you feel compelled to use data labels to overcome the visual confusion inherent in a 3D chart, you would be better off using a non-3D chart or even a simple table of values.

A third problem is data dependent. In a multiple series 3D column chart, a higher value column in the foreground may totally obscure a lower value column in the background, resulting in missing data. Note in the chart above how the tallest blue column totally obscures a green column in the background (the value for the Night shift for Ward 106).

Finally, I find it much more difficult to identify patterns and trends in a 3D chart, especially one with more than one data series. I have to work at it -- something that well designed charts don’t require. One of the main purposes of displaying data in a chart is to facilitate the identification of patterns and trends and a non-3D chart does a much better job -- at least for me.

By the way, most experts who write books on chart design agree that 3D charts should not be used.


James M. SmithDr. James M. Smith gives lectures at facilities/colleges and conferences across the country showing healthcare staff how to analyze and present data more effectively. His belief is that data presented as data are meaningless, but data presented as information are priceless. Information on his "largely bullet free" presentations may be found on his website.

Prior to becoming a consultant, James served the Quality Management Officer for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) hospitals in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area. He has a doctorate in Experimental Psychology from Fordham University and has over 35 publications in professional journals.

Categories: charting, guest_post, opinion, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Once you add animation to a slide object, you can make the animation happen slower or faster using its speed properties. You can also cause the animation to happen on a click, or automatically by changing its event. However, you can do much more -- did you know that you can set a delay time after which any slide object animates? So, why would you add a delay? There are several reasons and primarily, delay can be beneficial if you want to maintain a time limit between two animations -- as in having the second animation occur 10 seconds after the first one concludes. Of course, that was just a simple example and animation delay can be helpful in many other scenarios.



Learn about Animation Delay in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: animation, office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Tuesday, August 21, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 4:54 PM IST



PowerPoint celebrated its 25th birthday last month, and in a special world exclusive we have Robert Gaskins, the founder of PowerPoint reminisce about how PowerPoint might have been named Presenter if someone else did not trademark that name. And in a curious turn of events, one of the commentors of his post owns up to trademarking the Presenter name. Post 25 years, the world is a small place! We also look at the new PowerPoint 2013 from a developer perspective this week.

Read the newsletter here.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



How your paragraphs get positioned as a bulleted list within PowerPoint's text placeholders or another text object is influenced by three types of Indent Markers: The First Indent Marker, the Hanging Indent Marker, and the Left Indent Marker. Of the three Indent Markers you can see on the Ruler, the Hanging Indent Marker is used to tweak the position of the paragraph following the bullet. The Hanging Indent Marker is also known as the Middle Caret.



Learn how to tweak the start position of paragraphs in bulleted lists using the Hanging Indent Marker in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, text, tutorials

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Monday, August 20, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Among the various improvements that authorSTREAM made to their video engine, HD video conversion is the one that stands apart. This improvement is significant since it will make all the difference in the world to those who need to quickly create high resolution video output. So what do you need to create this high quality video output, and where can you use it? Let's first answer the second question and then look at the first one for the rest of this post.

Video is no longer the realm of only those who sit in front of high end systems with software worth thousands of dollars installed. Everyone wants to create a quick video -- perhaps for one of these reasons:

  1. Digital signage: A new offer, product, or feature has been introduced and you need a quick video promotional -- something quick, or even a prototype before you meet with your ad agency to do a shoot with models, locations, and hundreds of other nuances.

  2. Television series: You work in a television studio and need a quick mock up of your ideas for a full production or just a single episode.

  3. Event showcase: You are taking part in a large event that includes an expo -- you can provide a quick 4 or 5 minute video clip that will be shown on LEDs all over the venue.

  4. Photos keepsake: You want a quick video clip with music and photographs to show for a family wedding, anniversary, or birthday party. You'll show this on a high res display -- so the resolution has to be high quality.

  5. PowerPoint alternative: You want to do a semi-presentation session that has slides with text -- and also many pictures, animated objects, and video clips. However all this needs to be shown on a television without a laptop or tablet connected -- and it may have to be a self running video clip.

Of course, we just highlighted five typical scenarios -- and no doubt, there will many other situations that may be similar to these.

You can of course fire up PowerPoint and easily add all the pictures and text that you need. Add sound or video clips as required, and what do you do next? If you use PowerPoint 2010, you could use the Create a Video option -- but that again has limitations. It does not loop media such as audio and video clips, and does not provide HD quality output. Also, you may be using an older version of PowerPoint -- or one of PowerPoint's Mac versions that has no Create a Video option.

authorSTREAM's solution lets you to upload your PowerPoint to their servers, and you then let them take care of the rest. Soon after you upload the slides to their site, you can choose an HD video output option. As soon as your HD video is ready, you'll receive an email asking you to download your video clip!

Do note though that authorSTREAM's HD output options are not free, and you may have to pay a small amount to access this feature. If you already are subscribed to one of their premium subscription plans, then the HD video output options are already included within the plan.

To get started, you can follow these steps:

  1. You must first upload a PowerPoint presentation to your authorSTREAM account. Here's an embedded presentation that we uploaded for this post:



    Do note that the presentation we uploaded was in the wide screen format. If you still have not played the embedded presentation, above -- then you might see a 4:3 window, but play it and it shows thereafter in 16:9. Although authorSTREAM doesn't seem to officially support the 16:9 wide screen format, it did work for us!

  2. Next you go to your My Presentations page on authorSTREAM. You need to be signed into your account for this to work.

  3. Find the presentation you uploaded, click the Video button shown in the screenshot below to open a popup menu. Choose the Convert to Video option, shown highlighted in red, below.



  4. You'll see the Convert presentation to video dialog, as shown below. Open the Select video format drop-down list, and choose the MP4 HD Quality option. Then click the Next button.



  5. If your slides have no set transition timings, you can now choose how long you want each slide to be shown (see screenshot below). Then click the Convert Now button.



  6. You will see a message that says Your presentation will be converted into a video in a short while. You will receive a confirmation email as soon as it's ready. Check your mail -- in a few minutes, you will receive a link to download your presentation in the form of an HD video.

Our contact at authorSTREAM for this post was Dinesh Awasthi -- thank you, Dinesh.

Categories: authorstream, powerpoint, video

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