PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: September 2012

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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Concept Slides: Eight Segment Circle

Saturday, September 29, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



As part of our segment circles series, we bring you this 8 segment circle graphic that you can use to effectively explain any idea in your presentation that comprises 8 components/elements. Each individual segment is a separate shape that can be filled in with a picture, a gradient, a solid fill, or any of the other PowerPoint fill types. In the example shown, we used all 8 pictures related to food. Similarly, when you use this 8 segment circle in your presentation, try to use pictures that are related to each other.

  

Download and use this concept slide in your presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, September 28, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:40 AM IST



When you open PowerPoint 2013 for the first time, you'll see that all slide examples in the Presentation Gallery are in widescreen aspect ratio with 16:9 proportions. This is in complete contrast to the typical standard slides with 4:3 aspect ratios that you saw in all older PowerPoint versions. For many of us who are living in a world with widescreen displays and projectors, this may be a blessing -- but many others may not feel as blessed! Worse, there's no obvious way for you to change these defaults so that you can always have 4:3 slides rather than 16:9. Microsoft probably made this change since widescreen is the common format for current displays nowadays -- but to provide no option to choose an aspect ratio at the time of creating a slide is akin to providing zero control to the user.



Learn about PowerPoint 2013's default 16:9 widescreen slide option.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Raptivity 7.3 enables you to quickly create learning interactions. You can choose from over 180 learning interactivity templates and add games, simulations, brainteasers, interactive diagrams, virtual worlds, etc. All these interactions can then be exported to various formats -- most of the newer interactions support HTML5 output that's iPad friendly. Additionally, you can enhance the repertoire of interactions by adding more packs to your Raptivity installation -- these packs need to be purchased separately.



Learn more about Raptivity 7.3, a product that enables you to quickly create learning interactions.

Categories: elearning

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Presentation properties (metadata) are the details about a presentation that include specifics such as title, author name, subject, and keywords that identify the document's topic or contents. It is important to specify relevant values for the presentation Properties fields, so that it can be easily organized and identified. Populating the Properties fields also helps you search for particular slides more efficiently later.



Learn how to view and edit current presentation properties in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Thursday, September 27, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



When launched, PowerPoint typically 2013 opens a Presentation Gallery. The Presentation Gallery provides several ways to start your next presentation using a template, a Theme, a recent presentation, a not-so-recent presentation, or even a blank presentation. These and other choices are explained in this tutorial.



Explore the new Presentation Gallery in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



When you use PowerPoint or any other Microsoft Office program, you can work with a particular object only if it has been selected. For example, you need to select a shape to make changes to that particular shape on your PowerPoint slide. Similarly, you must select a chart to edit it. And yes, you can select a text container object such as a text placeholder, a text box, or even a shape -- and then make changes to its position, formatting, size, etc. However, this changes the entire text container, and leaves the actual text content largely unchanged. To make changes to the actual text, you first need to select the text and then make changes by using the options available within the Home tab of the Ribbon or within the Format Text dialog box.



Explore various ways of selecting text in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, text, tutorials

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



After our successful Segment Circles series, we bring you the Segment Polygons series. We start with this Segment Triangle slide: a triangle that includes three equal, perfectly sized segments that you can use to effectively illustrate “three-in-one” or “one-for-three” relationships. Each individual segment is a separate shape that can be filled in with a picture, a gradient, a solid fill, or any of the other PowerPoint fill types. In the example shown in the download presentation, we used all three pictures related to nature. Use this Segment Triangles in your presentation and share your feedback with us!

  

Download and use these slides in your presentations.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



When you are working on a PowerPoint presentation, the AutoSave option, if enabled, automatically saves your file at the specified time increments. This way you get to replace your current file with an earlier version. This can be very useful if you want to go back to the state of your slides an hour ago, or even two hours ago without having to use any Undo option.



Learn how to restore earlier versions of your current presentation in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Tuesday, September 25, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



We start this issue with an unconventional approach to no-bullets presentations – let’s give you a hint, a conversation replaces the bullets. We then provide you with an amazing seven segment circle graphic that’s completely PowerPoint ready – just copy and drop it in your next presentation to edit, modify, and play with. Did you know about the lengths that people would go to – just so that they are in proximity to their iPads? Learn more about that too! Then you get to read how you can create better slides for a PechaKucha or Ignite presentation. And then there’s a review of a large collection of PowerPoint charts and diagrams. Have fun reading this issue and share your thoughts with us!

Read the newsletter here.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Sound effects that play along with slide transitions are one of those small touches that can add interest or be pesky. Whether you want to add these sound effects is entirely your call, but do remember that discretion can often be a better choice! Tread with caution since a sound playing with every slide transition can not only sound cheesy, but it can also unnecessarily distract your audience. Having said that, there are occasions where a sound effect can be wisely applied to PowerPoint slide transitions -- maybe a chime sound for just one slide? Whatever you decide, let us now show you how you can add a sound to accompany a slide transition.



Learn how to add slide transition sound in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, sounds,transitions, tutorials

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Monday, September 24, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



After being a public accountant and well-trained stage actor, I began to develop a growing interest in the microcomputer industry in the late 1970s. Observing the early technologies of Apple, Microsoft and IBM, I watched operating systems and software programs evolve. The swiftly changing technology actually shifted work habits, opening up "windows" of opportunity for me – in more ways than one.

Desktop computers placed more information immediately at our fingertips, creating greater senses of urgency as organizations "differentiated" by pushing the most relevant content. The traditional work schedules of "9-to-5" were quickly waning as the collecting and managing of retrievable bits of information unfortunately made the normal workday much longer. These in-house, overtime efforts were often relegated to administrators and general staff who were spending late nights and weekends producing deliverable media for executives who were touting their solutions in face-to-face meetings.

Smaller companies, with dedicated teams, offered services to assist in time-management related tasks, such as building presentations, and outsourcing options were a welcomed sigh of relief to overworked staff.

The Dawn of a New Era

In 1985, the landscape of visual presentations was mostly hardcopy (overheads and slides). In fact, the 35mm slide was considered the "state-of-the-art" media format and each one was either manually typeset by local photo/imaging developers or produced in-house by larger companies using high-priced slide-making equipment (such as Genigraphics), with separate departments dedicated to managing the services. The appearance of affordable and portable data projectors was several years away. The Macintosh was just entering the market, and the Video Graphics Array (VGA) ushered a manageable 640 x 480 display when referencing screen resolution on computer monitors.

When I started my company MediaNet, in 1985, I had already been investigating an alternative way to design and deliver visual content. I focused on a novel approach described as "electronic images", and I marketed a very unique electronic visual playback device called VideoShow from General Parametrics. Similar to a modern notebook computer, this digital media (floppy disk) format offered the ability to immediately edit, change, duplicate and display images without reproducing the output as with slides or overheads.

The VideoShow device was unique and impressive. The graphics emulated the arcade games of the day, similar to today's PlayStation, or even akin to the now popular retina display of the iPad. The stunning visual images could be immediately displayed on a computer monitor or large screen projection system, and the images could be advanced electronically with a remote control (sound familiar?). This meant that you could have "slide-like" images stored on rewritable media, updated immediately, with a lower overall cost of production (compared to duplicating slides and transparencies).

In the absence of an image projector, with a separate camera-based device (PhotoMetric), 35mm slides could still be produced; and using the Calcomp line of color printers, full-color overhead transparencies could be made, as well. The entire VideoShow collection was like having a graphics department at your desk. I even trademarked a unique combination of hardware and software components calling my "solution" the "VideoShow Presentation System" and identifying the integrated software programs as "Presenter" software.

As a side note, little did I know that my registering the name "Presenter" software in late 1985 would change the course of another company located on the opposite coast. At around the same time, Microsoft was interested in offering a program for the Macintosh in 1987, called Microsoft "Presenter". They discovered that someone had already registered the name -- so they changed their software title into something called "PowerPoint". I did not know about any of this until I read Robert Gaskins’ interview which describes how PowerPoint got its name.

In larger companies, the ever-growing backlog of people waiting for their in-house Genigraphics team to process slide requests led to more sales of our "presentation system" solution. Frustrated individual departments began buying the VideoShow as the alternative. But the underlying challenge was that when anyone bought one of these $3,500 VideoShow devices, someone still had to create the content using the provided "Presenter" software, and time-management issues continued. As a result, we had more and more requests to design the presentations because no one wanted to master the software -- and for one very good reason -- whoever became the in-house expert would be the one working late nights and weekends designing slides for everyone else in the department!

Learning What Really Works

In the midst of all this creative work, my real question in slide design was to figure out what audiences preferred rather than create content based on what we "thought" looked good or what others were doing. Although there were plenty of books on color theory (mostly related to painting), there was very little published research available on the effective design of projected electronic images. This was not surprising since all this technology was being used as it was being developed!

This was a brand new world for so many people -- hardware manufacturers, software designers, and creative services companies. The lack of research related to electronic presentations was understandable as academic budgets rarely allowed access to the most modern technology, and few researchers were conducting in-depth studies on the presentation effects of color, room layout, lighting, media formats, etc., especially with large audiences across multiple venues, using electronic displays.

To the technology companies who wanted to know what worked and what didn't work, MediaNet suddenly became an ideal testing ground for audience analysis because we were already creating hundreds of presentations each year for major companies who were consistently presenting in front of large groups domestically and sometimes globally. We just needed to gather some information whenever events unfolded, and create "study-scenarios" at live events to test reactions.

We tracked audience feedback from over 1,500 presentations over a three-year period, noting audience preferences for colors, room conditions, and elements of visual design, especially with images viewed from a distance. We had people attending events (positioned behind the display screens) and observing audience reactions, interviewing people to gain feedback, constantly making notes and reflecting these preferences in our future visual designs.

Several organizations (most notably 3M) asked us to summarize the data and the findings were reported in trade journals, and industry white papers. Later, our information gathering techniques were included in academic studies from the University of Minnesota, Ohio State and others. Interestingly, much of the current research found in the literature today mirrors many of the findings we uncovered, which also supports the visual design principles we espoused in the early years.

Form Follows Function

Being at the forefront, clients sought our "design" expertise, and the overall look of a presentation was clearly at our disposal. The use of full-color backgrounds certainly eliminated the "blast of white light" generated by traditional overheads. Hollywood had already long-mastered the art of visibility from a distance (dark backgrounds, light foregrounds, even with rolling credits at the end of a movie) and the world of 35mm slides continued that pattern, so why would electronic images be any different? The TV remote resulted in shorter commercials and suddenly savvy audiences were demanding simple visual designs to match much shorter attention spans.

As color images flourished, black & white overhead transparencies were soon viewed as second-rate and were for those who either did not understand the effect of visual content from a distance, or were not financially able to afford color images. Either way, audience preferences for full-color visuals were made abundantly clear. Even software designers began adding clip-art in order to satisfy the needs of a growing audience of visual creatures. The next big step was in the hardware area as technology became more portable and electronic delivery more feasible.

By the early 1990's the VideoShow was being replaced by notebook computers connected to LCD panels and portable projectors displaying images designed in "Windows-based" graphic programs like Lotus Freelance, Harvard Graphics, and even Microsoft PowerPoint which had been a Mac product since 1987. Once PowerPoint was bundled into the Office Suite, the slide-design service business began fading because so many people were designing their own presentations right at their desks.

Electronic presentations also meant that certain conventional design elements could be eliminated. The company logo, for example, was only incorporated into 35mm slides for a very simple reason -- those little rectangular chromes were often misplaced or mixed up at the slide developer's site. Without a logo or some identification it was easy for an IBM bar chart to end up in a Nabisco slide deck! These things actually happened! Yet, electronic images were intangible and could not be misplaced, so repetitive logos were now just visual distractions that added no value to the existing content and could easily be eliminated, making way for full-screen photos, and more flexibility in design.

With full-color backgrounds and photographic images, the "visual display" became more important. Yellow or white text with a black drop-shadow, set on a dark blue (indigo or navy) background made content more clearly visible from greater distances. But the projectors were struggling to maintain brightness in rooms where lights could not dim, and complete darkness was poor for note taking, so "room layout" options changed how presentations were viewed. The high-gain, glass-beaded screens, originally made for 35mm slides, made full-color electronic images look great, and created more narrow room layouts with even larger screens. The realization was that the uneven distribution of light (no light hitting the screen, focused light on the presenter, and some light above the audience) suddenly created a sense of "theatre".

The Performance of Print

The good news for MediaNet was that the proliferation of desktop software meant that more people were creating their own visuals, resulting in an abundance of poorly-designed presentations, mostly filled with cluttered information, delivered by anyone who had anything to say to anyone who would listen. Companies were promoting novice presenters who were delivering excessively wordy and busy content. This problematic design issue (still true to this day), suggested that while organizations could not make average people into graphic artists, they still only had average presenters with less than artistic delivery skills.

Suddenly, the interest was not so much in fixing the design, but in perfecting the delivery, which allowed people like me to focus on the nonverbal, body language and other "performance" elements that I had already developed from my early theatre days. These skills would highlight yet another shift in the presentation arena -- developing the three-dimensional expression of what was once on paper -- people needed to learn presentation skills. I was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time.

In 1992, Daniele Joudene, a senior executive at In Focus Systems (the leading projector manufacturer), took interest in our audience research and in the skills training I was offering. She saw a market opportunity to have someone show people how to become better than average presenters, while using portable electronic products. She suggested I become the keynote speaker for a series of domestic and international seminars (multi-year, 40-city tours) to offer insights in to "the secrets of the portable presenter". The mystery could be solved with a projector (In Focus), graphics software (Lotus Freelance) and a notebook computer (Toshiba). In later years, Microsoft replaced Lotus on the tour.

These Electrifying Presentations seminars were attended by more than 25,000 people, leading to substantial and measurable returns for the sponsors, and providing MediaNet with more audience feedback to add to the already expansive data we had collected several years earlier, all with the intent to help us continually improve the presentation process. To support the seminars, we incorporated the collected feedback of our research efforts into a very functional book filled with practical advice titled Purpose, Movement, Color.

Within a few years, technology sophistication would allow presenters to add multimedia elements (sound, video, animation), which, as with any new option, has its challenges. Whereas few people were graphic artists when it came to slide design, even fewer were production specialists who knew the nuances of multimedia elements. Most underestimated the time it takes to edit video, sound or animation, and these media segments often looked out of place in a presentation, or some technology glitch would wreak havoc on the event. It took a while before presentations matured, and seasoned presenters now tend to become familiar with technology ahead of time, before attempting new activities in front of audiences.

Currently there are different software programs for designing and displaying content, each with a new twist on an old idea. But, since the middle of the 1990s there has not been a tremendous change in the relative structure of presentations -- that is, having a clear message, offering some evidence (usually visual support), and providing an effective delivery style that leads to a call to action.

Where Do We Go From Here?

I tend to categorize the period from the emergence of the personal computer until the appearance of the smartphone as an “age of information”. But now, the fact is that information is truly at our fingertips --- on cell phones or other portable devices ---and suddenly we can Google our way into solving trivial riddles, rendering arguments useless, and gaining instant gratification for finding what we need to know when we need to know it. Strangely enough, we are still spending late nights and weekends gathering and sharing relevant information, except we have access to the data from anywhere.

With all this valuable and available information ever-present in our lives, I think we are now moving from the "age of information" into what I like to call the "age of explanation". Power once rested with those who could find relevant data -- but now the respect is shown to those who can make sense of it all. It is not difficult to gather statistics, articles, discussions, studies, and other evidence to support the topic, but now we want to know what to do with all this stuff. Those who can sift through the rubble and produce a gem are the ones with expertise and vision.

It’s easy to collect the dots, but far more difficult to connect them!

For those who are connecting the dots, the future of presentations is clearly focusing on the delivery of expertise supported with a limited display of content. The better slides will be designed to be viewed, not read. The images will "tease", never "please" allowing visual support to provide only enough content to lead an audience directly back to the presenter for the interpretive context. Interaction, where possible, will engage audiences by involving them in the problem, not simply offering a preplanned solution.

Change will occur with interpersonal communication, the appeal to long-term memory using stories, examples and analogies, a knowledgeable presenter who comes equipped with questions for the audience that stimulate thinking, and someone who understands that the non-verbal cues must remain congruent with prepared content.

Assessments that can measure skills will gain prominence as presenters seek immediate feedback from audiences in order to adapt to ever-changing conditions. Savvy speakers will understand audience preferences and find ways to meet individual needs in a variety of venues.

Visually speaking, ahead of us should be the streamlined version of what preceded us!


Tom MuccioloTom Mucciolo is President of MediaNet, Inc., a presentation skills company in New York City. Since 1985, he has served as a presentation skills consultant for major corporations concentrating on the script, visual design, and delivery skills associated with presentations.

Tom is also part of the faculty at NYU and with his colleague, Dr. Leila Jahangiri, he has collaborated on extensive research in the area of teaching & presentation effectiveness, publishing articles, interactive assessment tools, and the recent book A Guide to Better Teaching. He is the co-author of five other books and two interactive CDs.

Categories: guest_post, opinion, powerpoint, presentation_skills

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Have you ever created a brand new presentation in PowerPoint and then closed it without saving it for even once? This scenario seem to be little unbelievable - because even if you accidently close your presentation, PowerPoint asks whether you would like to save the presentation or not. So just in case you did the unbelievable and discarded all your changes, there are chances that your updated presentation may be saved in some state -- also it's entirely plausible that you may have lost all your file changes to a system or PowerPoint crash. Most of the time, PowerPoint will salvage your file and offer to open it for you the next time you launch the program -- alternatively, if you don't see any files being offered for recovery, you can set the process in action manually.



Learn how to recover presentations manually in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Saturday, September 22, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



A segment of a circle is defined as the region between the chord of a circle and its associated arc. This conceptual slide contains a circle with 7 segments you can use to illustrate any concept or entity comprising 7 components/elements, for example seven days of a week. Try and use pictures that complement each other – or even strongly contrast with each other. In the sample slides you see, we used an Education theme for all the pictures within the 7 segments. Whatever choices you make, the resulting slide should have a compelling impact on your audience – and should sync with the message of your presentation. We have used basic PowerPoint shapes to create most of these conceptual designs. Also, some of them are imported from other graphic programs and converted to PowerPoint shapes.

  

Download and use this concept slide in your presentation.

Categories: graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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Friday, September 21, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



There are so many ways in which you can create a better chart or a diagram using nothing apart from the tools available in PowerPoint -- yet playing with all these options does take a fair amount of time. If you want something quick, and also want the graphic content of your slides to shine through, then you may want to explore our review product: CrystalGraphics Chart and Diagram Slides for PowerPoint. Charts and Diagram Slides for PowerPoint is from CrystalGraphics, a well-known vendor of PowerPoint add-ins for more than a decade. This add-in comprises over 1000 data-driven charts and editable diagrams. All the content is available as slides that you insert into your existing presentations. While the entire content is available as PowerPoint slides (in the PPTX format), the best way to use these is via a custom add-in that plugs into PowerPoint.



Explore CrystalGraphics Chart and Diagram Slides for PowerPoint.

Categories: templates, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



As discussed in our Sharing and Deleting Custom Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2008 and 2011 for Mac tutorial, you cannot create your own Theme Fonts sets from within PowerPoint 2011 or PowerPoint 2008 for Mac. However since all Theme Fonts sets essentially are a bunch of code within an Open XML file, there's nothing preventing you from opening any existing Theme Fonts file with the .XML extension, and then editing them within a text editor. Save this file with a new name in a designated folder and you actually end up creating your own custom Theme Fonts set!



Learn how to create custom Theme Fonts using XML on the Mac.

Categories: fonts, office_mac, powerpoint_2008, powerpoint_2011, text, themes, tutorials

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Thursday, September 20, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



After a typical presentation, how much do attendees remember when they walk out of the room? Are there some parts of a presentation that they remember more, and if that's true, then why?
What can presenters and slide designers do so that the audience can have a better memory recall about their message and content?

These were the questions we sent to Dr. Carmen Taran earlier this year. Her response was that we typically we forget approximately 70% of content after 48 hours. She also added that no one has verified the topic of memory when it applies to slides, namely: how many slides people remember (or forget) after 48 hours. She had already pondered about these questions before, and was intrigued enough to put together a study. She calls it a major endeavor and needs real audience input now -- the purpose of her study is to find the answers to these questions. Empirically!

How many PowerPoint slides do you think people remember from a presentation after 48 hours? How many would you remember? What do you think: 3 or 4 slides? Or maybe more? These are some of the questions that Carmen has been searching answers for -- she believes that answers to these questions will help cure the world of PowerPoint anemia :)

This observation study implies 5 minutes of your time to watch a 20-slide PowerPoint deck. Then in two days, you'll be asked you what you remember via a 1-question online form. That's it.

In return, you will be the first to receive our findings, which will translate into practical guidelines on how to create more memorable PowerPoint presentations. You will also be able to download the slides you view.

Finally, we will put up an exclusive conversation with Carmen on Indezine so that you can hear from her about ways and ideas to make and deliver more memorable slides!

Access the brief research site (please don't take any notes).

Carmen TaranDr. Carmen Taran's presentations and workshops help business professionals to use communication and presentation skills to increase revenue, train or motivate others, and overall to stand out from too much sameness in the industry.

A published author, Dr. Taran is frequently invited as a keynote speaker at various conferences. She is co-founder of Rexi Media, a company that helps business professionals from all fields improve their presentation skills, whether they deliver content face-to-face, online, or create ondemand presentations. To learn more, visit the Rexi Media site.

Categories: powerpoint, survey

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



After spending an inordinate amount of time to create your PowerPoint presentation, your computer unexpectedly crashes or your computer just shuts off due to a power failure. Or maybe just PowerPoint crashes for any number of reasons. Of course, since you had zero warnings, your files were not saved -- you are thus left with the state of your last saved presentation. Not really because you can restart PowerPoint, and one of two occurrences might happen.



Learn how to automatically recover your unsaved presentation in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Countless voices will tell you that it’s a sin to make your audiences suffer with slides that are populated with bullets, but ask for a solution and the voices will diminish to just one or two. And even then, you may not be able to use all the advice! So, here’s one option: a no-bullets alternative for you -- this presentation is an example of how you can use a callout style as an alternative to bulleted lists. Make sure you notice ways to get in your pictures, charts, and tables within this callout style. Also this question and answer (you can just call it a “conversation”) format will help you involve your audience much better, especially if you animate the callouts and their connectors sequentially one after the other. Even better, use the Push transition effect for your slides to get the most from this style.

  

Download the sample presentation and use as required.

Categories: powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Although PowerPoint 2011 for Mac provides several Theme Fonts sets, it doesn't allow you to create custom Theme Fonts sets within PowerPoint or in any other Office program. This ability is provided in PowerPoint for Windows, but it's one of those features that's not available on Mac versions of the program. So why is it important to be able to edit and create custom Theme Fonts sets?



Learn how to share and delete the custom Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2008 and 2011 for Mac.

Categories: fonts, office_mac, powerpoint_2008, powerpoint_2011, text, themes, tutorials

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Tuesday, September 18, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



Want an old fashioned PowerPoint alarm clock? Yes, it's fun but it can also be put to so many practical uses -- and none of them will wake you in the morning! And then you might want to try using an old scanner to bring in some visual imagery for your slides. We have these covered in this issue of the newsletter along with exclusive conversations and guest posts too -- read about Ellen Finkelstein's amazing Outstanding Presentations webinar series. And there are the usual lists of newly released PowerPoint tutorials for both Windows and Mac users. Have a great week.

Read the newsletter here.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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