This is the print version of this page. All content is copyright Indezine.com 2000- .



PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: November 2012

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes
PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary
PowerPoint Programming

Subscribe to this blog



Handmade Slides: Pushpins for PowerPoint - 02

Friday, November 30, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



You have used and seen real pushpins on notice boards -- now use these pushpin graphics to create the same look on your slides! The presentation you will download includes "pushpin" graphics that can be used within your slides to create a look that makes a picture, shape, or anything else appear as if it has been pushed onto a surface, board, or wall with a pin! These ready-made pushpins have been provided in five colors. Just copy them and paste them on the pictures in your presentation.

  

Download and use these pushpins in your slides.

Categories: design, graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



While working in PowerPoint you might have noticed that you resize text boxes almost the same way as you would resize shapes or any other slide object -- select the slide object and you will see eight handles, four on the corners and four on the sides -- you then drag any of these corners to resize. The problem with this approach is that there is no accuracy in resizing. There might be times when you need your text box to be resized to some particular size -- for example, you want it to be exactly as wide as a picture you have inserted.



Learn how to resize text boxes accurately on a slide in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, text, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, November 29, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Once a picture is inserted in your slide, you can do so much more. Explore cropping, or adjust how the picture looks by applying adjust picture options. Additionally, you may also apply any of the preset Picture Styles available. In this tutorial, we will explore the Border options that allow you to add a simple outline or even a beautiful frame to your pictures.



Learn how to add and edit Picture Borders in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: pictures, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, November 28, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Ric BretschneiderRic Bretschneider spent over 16 years on the Microsoft PowerPoint team building features within the product. Ric founded the San Jose, CA branch of the Pecha Kucha presentation event, and can occasionally be heard on his Presentations Roundtable podcast, promoting excellence in design and technique through interviews of industry professionals. His blog offers thoughts on presenting and other important subjects.

In this conversation, Ric discusses the new PowerPoint 2013.

Geetesh: What are your thoughts about PowerPoint 2013 – what do you like, what do you miss?

Ric: PowerPoint 2013 is full of things that will delight users, and a few things that will give user's pause. Luckily, the latter are few and easily avoided or turned off so I won't dwell on them much. I'll only comment on a couple good ones that really grab me.

I'm very happy that the PowerPoint team has continued to evolve the Presenter View. This is a special view that is typically only shown on the screen facing the presenter, with user interface and other information they can reference during a presentation. The idea is that the projected image doesn't show anything other than the presenter's slides.



It has been painful to me to be in presentations where the presenter stays in the Normal editing view to get this type of control -- it's a shamefully bad experience. However, in the past it was really difficult to configure your machine to run Presenter View and impossible to practice with it when you didn't have that second monitor or projector attached.

Luckily both problems have been worked on and it's much easier to get to Presenter View, and make sure it's showing up on the right screen. And if you're practicing with a single machine, you can now bring Presenter View up and work with it on that single screen. You just hold down the Alt key when you press F5. Really easy.

When we first made the Presenter View, there was one thing I really tried to drive home. It's very hard to be a presenter in front of an audience, and everything you ask them to do to work the presentation has to be easier than when they're using PowerPoint in their office. A big example of this was the idea that you shouldn't have to hit small targets with the mouse. Buttons and things you need to click should be big, easy to target, especially if your hand is trembling. This is an area where the new design has gone backwards a little, but it's because they've been focusing on using this view with a tablet and adopting the somewhat controversial Mosaic design style. It's not horrible, but the idea that the navigation and utility buttons are dimmer, and a bit smaller than in the prior version is such a lost opportunity to make this truly great and easy for the user.

What is totally cool about the new Presenter View are the feature additions. First, a magnificent black background. I don't know how they got this by Office Design who seems to have wanted everything to be washed-out grays and whites, but kudos. It's totally beautiful and functionally the right thing to do for a presenter. Next, the resizable panes. This may seem like not so much of a big deal, but it actually let's you prioritize the use of the various information areas, especially if you're using the text area as your personal teleprompter. Prior versions let you do a little of this, but never let you close out an area entirely. And I may be wrong, but I think they increased the sensitivity to grabbing the dividing lines here so it's actually easier to drag these divisions larger or smaller. If I'm wrong there, I blame my enthusiasm for the black background spilling over into that evaluation. Now if only they'd do a solid black background in PowerPoint's editing views!

And finally, the ability to go into a slide-sorter like view in Presenter View is simply magical. This lets you navigate to another slide randomly, without the audience being aware that you're doing anything more than advancing to the next slide. It is so much like a card trick where the magician pulls out the card you were thinking of, but this time from a slide deck. Back in the 90's we started getting requests from people who wanted this functionality, but who couldn't really state how it should work. This is spot-on what those users wanted.

That went way too long so let me do just one more that a lot of people may miss.

Hallelujah! They've brought back floating panes. One of the big mistakes of Office 2007 has been partially undone.

In Office 2007, the Office Ribbon Czars decided that a lot of older (I like to think of them as "time-tested") UI conventions would be unapologetically trashed because everyone was supposed to "love the Ribbon." One of these sacrifices that the PowerPoint team knew was a mistake were floating formatting tools. Floating meant you could bring this stuff down to the bottom of the screen where you were working and be that much more efficient.

In PowerPoint 2013, you can reestablish floating task panes via a two-step process.

Click on some text or a shape and the Ribbon automatically shows the appropriate formatting Ribbon's tab. Click that tab and then click on the tiny dialog launcher (box with arrow) icon at the bottom of say the Shape Styles group in that Ribbon.



Hey, look at that! A new pane will open up to the right of the screen with all the appropriate settings right there, easy to get at. And that pane is contextual, it changes depending on what you have selected. So if you then click into a text box, all the text commands show up there.



But the best part is that pane can be "undocked!" That means you can move your mouse pointer up around the pane's title and drag it away from the edge of the window, out over the slide content! You can move it around the screen, even redock it! This is a blessing to anyone trying to do great design on a large monitor.



I could go on, but those are the first two that come to mind. Hope that gets some other folks as excited as it has me.

Geetesh: New technologies such as SkyDrive get more integrated with PowerPoint (and Office) with each release. What do you think about this trend – is it too soon, too late, or just right?

Ric: SkyDrive is a funny one. I use SkyDrive mostly to preview Office documents I've received in e-mail, and it does a great job of that, better than anything else on the web.



For me, my online storage of choice is DropBox, because they've available on every platform, have good performance and feature set, and they're a very mature application. Microsoft has gone perhaps a half-dozen times into the storage sync story, and I've tried every one of them. Unfortunately, as you might infer, they've been offered and abandoned over time.

SkyDrive is a rebranding of some tech Microsoft has been working on for a while, but they seem to have made a bigger commitment here in integrating this in Office, especially since it's the default save choice. Luckily you can change that default, but it's still very easy to get to when you want to use it. If you're an Office user you have access to SkyDrive Pro, which lets you sync local folders with the cloud service. Once you do that, saving locally to those folders makes sure you have a local copy and one in the cloud. DropBox works in that mode by default, which is a slightly simpler metaphor for users to get their head around.

I think SkyDrive is more appealing than Apple's iCloud if you actually sit down and compare them in scenario based appraisals. Both have clients for each other's platforms, a SkyDrive menu bar control for OSX and a Windows control panel for iCloud, and they work well. But Apple doen't have an Android client, which SkyDrive does. And Microsoft is more generous in memory. Apple is very focused on up-selling you cloud storage.

But personally I feel more comfortable with file and folder sharing with DropBox. I know a couple of people who have gotten screwed over (in their opinions) by sharing files with me via SkyDrive, and they still don't forgive me for making them use it. I've never had a complaint from anyone I've worked with through DropBox. Apple's iCloud isn't a player here, the iCloud storage is obfuscated, only displayed as app space use, no folder structure to navigate or randomly reassign. It's the iPhone/iPad data story come to the computer, and sorry but it sucks.

Cloud storage is something everyone needs to evaluate for themselves. Personally I'm not going to "switch" to SkyDrive. I'll make use of it for some of my Office documents, but that's about it. For everything else, I'm sticking with DropBox. Of course, if you're not already into a cloud storage service, you probably should try out SkyDrive when you install Office 2013.

See Also: Ric Bretschneider on Indezine

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



In PowerPoint, you can always select a text box and move it around by dragging it with your mouse, and then placing it in a new position. But this process is just visual and not accurate enough. Yes, there is a way to accurately position any text box just where you want it to be located if you use guides. Having said that, do not move your text boxes until they contain all the text content you need within them -- or, you may find that your text boxes resize themselves when you add text to them!



Learn how to reposition text boxes accurately on a slide in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, text, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, November 27, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



Did you want to add a pushpin to a slide object so that it looks pushed to a board or another surface? Now you can with our new Pushpin series! We also bring you more Frame Corners. Also learn to change the interface color in PowerPoint 2013, and understand with Sandra Schrift about how your body language speaks to others -- even when you are not actually speaking. Read an interview with Peter Zvirinsky of infoDiagram and get to know about Dave Paradi’s amazing new book. And before November ends, did you want to get some Movember moustaches for your slides? PowerPoint 2010 users can learn about cropping tricks for pictures and Mac users can explore layout and margins for text in PowerPoint 2011.



Read all this and more in Indezine News.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

Labels: ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Similar to how you apply Shape Styles to your shapes on your slide, PowerPoint enables you to apply Picture Styles to your inserted pictures. With a single click, Picture Styles transforms a simple looking picture to something that's more highlighted. Note that unlike Shapes Styles, Picture Styles are not Theme specific. They just transform your picture to make it look stylish by applying a border, or 3-D effect, or by changing the frame shape, etc.



Learn how to apply preset Picture Styles to your pictures in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: pictures, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Monday, November 26, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST



Besides many other new features, PowerPoint 2013's most noticeable cosmetic change is its user interface. Additionally, PowerPoint 2013 (and all other applications of Office 2013) now introduces the concept of "Office Background", which essentially is the small image strips visible on the top right area of the program interface. Looks like PowerPoint just got tattooed?



Learn how to change the Office Background in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, tutorials

Labels: ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Dag Hendrik LerdalDag Hendrik Lerdal is a 29 year old entrepreneur and Software Engineer with an MSc in Communication Technology living in Trondheim, Norway. After finishing his Master’s degree at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, he co-founded Preseria AS in 2008. The company develops technology and services related to planning, administration, execution and publishing of digital presentations in context of seminars, meetings and conferences.

In this conversation, Dag discusses the release of his new SlideDog program.

Geetesh: Can you share your thoughts about SlideDog, and how the beta helped shape the final product?

Dag: SlideDog has come a long way since we launched the beta earlier this year. The main issue people had with the beta was the waiting time between file switches. This has been fixed in the new release as we now pre-load all presentation files in the playlist before entering "show mode". Users won't experience any delay when switching between files using the new SlideDog. In addition to giving us feedback and providing us with usage metrics, the beta testers helped us gain a much clearer view on the presentation market and what people really need when doing presentations . We've temporarily removed some of the features that were included in the beta, but most of these and a couple of really cool new features will appear on www.slidedog.com very soon. We're really excited to bring seamless presentations to the world!





Geetesh: What are the file formats that SlideDog can play with, and does the end user need any of those applications locally installed?

Dag: SlideDog currently supports PowerPoints, PDFs, Images, Prezis, Videos and Web pages. By web pages we mean that you can add any URL and hence show any presentation format that is playable in a web browser such as YouTube clips, Google Docs, SlideRocket presentations, etc. To show local files you need Office or PowerPoint Viewer, Adobe Reader or Acrobat, Google Chrome and VLC installed on your machine.



See Also: SlideDog Beta: Conversation with Dag Hendrik Lerdal

Categories: interviews, online_presentations, powerpoint

Labels: , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



You might have seen columnar text layouts often in Word documents or even in published formats used by desktop publishing software. PowerPoint 2011 may not give you all those bells and whistles, but it does provide you with some essential column capabilities, although don't expect anything close to the controls provided by word processing applications. In PowerPoint, you can set up a text container to possess multiple linked columns.



Learn how to insert columnar text within a text box or other text containers in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, text, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Saturday, November 24, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



These frame corners are all included as graphics that you can copy from within the PowerPoint presentation that you download. Use these frame corners in your presentation and make your pictures stand out. You will find these frame corners in both black and white colors, and also filled with some solid colors, textures and gradients. Just copy and paste them as individual frame corners over your inserted pictures (or other slide objects). Place the first frame corner on the top-left corner of your picture and resize as required. For the remaining three corners, duplicate this frame corner, and place the duplicates on the other three corners, and rotate them as required.

  

Download and use these frame corners in your slides.

Categories: design, graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Friday, November 23, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Dave ParadiDave Paradi is the author of "The Visual Slide Revolution" and "102 Tips to Communicate More Effectively Using PowerPoint". He helps presenters communicate more effectively by using persuasive PowerPoint presentations. He has published over 270 issues of his bi-weekly newsletter, produced more than 70 slide makeover video podcasts and appears in media regularly. His web site is called Think Outside The Slide.

In this conversation, Dave discusses his new book, Present It So They Get It.

Geetesh: Your new book, Present It So They Get It focuses on the need for making your audiences "understand" effectively -- what motivated you to write this book?

Present It So They Get It Dave: In last year's survey of what annoys people about bad PowerPoint presentations, the message from audience members was clear that they are fed up with information overload. They want to understand the key message the presenter has to deliver, but the message gets lost in the overwhelming amount of text and data. Presenters and audiences alike want the message to be understood so people can take action. I realized that presenters needed a guide to help them plan a clear message that contains only the information the audience needs to hear, and a guide for creating effective slides to help communicate the message during the presentation. This book addresses both of those areas.

Geetesh: How are you sure that audiences don't understand a lot, and what takeaways does your book provide to the reader to make audiences grasp more?

Dave: I hear from executives all the time that they need their people to be clearer, or else the decision makers can't take action. We see this lack of clarity when an executive asks for another presentation on the same topic because the first presentation wasn't clear. We hear a management team limit presenters to only a few slides, in an attempt to get presenters to be focused with their message.

In the book, I detail my six step RAPIDS approach to planning your presentation. One of the steps that participants in my workshops always comment on is the I, which stands for Information that is laser focused. I provide five strategies for reducing the amount of information in your presentation down to the minimum required. When participants see how they can dramatically reduce the amount of information they provide and actually make the message clearer, they are amazed. I also provide tips for applying the RAPIDS approach to the four most common types of presentation in business today, so readers have a guide to follow when planning their presentation. The second half of the book gives readers a step-by-step approach to creating effective slides with concrete examples and best practices. This practical guide is easy to follow and implement. In my workshops, participants often comment that they won’t be able to look at a PowerPoint presentation the same way now that they have learned the ideas and approaches in this book.

See Also: 102 Tips to Communicate More Effectively Using PowerPoint: Conversation with Dave Paradi

Categories: books, interviews, powerpoint, presentation_skills

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



To make a PowerPoint presentation visually strong you can add shapes and pictures. And of course you can fill your shapes with pictures -- sometimes you end up with not so desirable results. Primarily, you'll find that PowerPoint insists on filling the entire picture to a shape -- in the process, the picture itself may appear distorted. This completely destroys the look you may want to attain. Fortunately, regaining the lost proportion is an easy option, as you will learn in this tutorial.



Learn how to reposition the picture fill in a shape, using the Fill (Crop) option in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: pictures, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments




Thursday, November 22, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 3:31 PM IST



It's been 5 years since Microsoft moved from the older Template format (POT) to the new Theme / Template formats (THMX and POTX) with the launch of PowerPoint 2007. Since then four PowerPoint versions for Mac and Windows have been launched with support for these new formats. Yet, most if not all PowerPoint templates that you will encounter in a typical Google search are limited to file formats that are many, many years old! Why is it so?

That's because creating proper THMX Theme files is almost a dark art -- many template vendors do not know where to begin! Converting their huge POT PowerPoint template collections would take ages -- and they are happy to sell you their old stuff. There's more -- many users still have not upgraded to the newer PowerPoint versions, and they still need the older POT format! We understand that most of you therefore need a solution that not only keeps your PowerPoint template collection contemporary -- but also allows you to work with older versions! And this solution is available to all of you as part of a never-before and probably never-after offer!

Learn more now.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint, templates, themes

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 10:33 AM IST



Internal margins control the amount of blank space between the perimeter (edge) and the actual text within all three types of text containers -- text boxes, text placeholders and shapes. Although these margins are similar to the margins of pages in a word-processing document like Microsoft Word, there is a significant difference. Each text container has its own individual margins set, and you can have entirely different margins for one or more text containers, even if they reside on the same slide. In this tutorial, we will explore how to set and change these internal margins for text within a text container in PowerPoint 2011.



Learn about setting internal margins for text containers in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, text, tutorials

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, November 21, 2012
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



These “pushpin” graphics are already placed in PowerPoint slides – just copy them and paste within your slides to create a look that makes a picture, shape, or anything else appear as if it has been pushed onto a surface, board, or wall with a pin! These ready-made pushpins are already within PowerPoint slides -- and have been provided in five colors. Just copy them and paste them on your slides.

  

Download and use these pushpins in your slides.

Categories: design, graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



We already broadly explored Crop options in PowerPoint 2010. While you can do conventional cropping within PowerPoint, you can also decide to not crop within the typical rectangular constraints, and use another shape instead. This tutorial explains the Crop to Shape option that lets you choose non-rectangular cropping shapes for your pictures -- the results tend to look like a picture has been contained within a shape.



Learn how to crop pictures using Crop to Shape option in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: pictures, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

Labels: , ,

0 comments








Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Home | PowerPoint | Photoshop | PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Tutorials | Blog | Notes | Ezine | Advertise | Feedback | Site Map | About Us | Contact Us

Link to Us | Privacy | Testimonials

PowerPoint Backgrounds | Christian PowerPoint Backgrounds | Business PowerPoint Presentation Templates

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

©2000-2016, Geetesh Bajaj. All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000