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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: March 2015

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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PowerPoint and Presenting News: March 31, 2015

Tuesday, March 31, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



Were you fascinated with paper planes as a child? Now you can fly them on your slides with our new Paper Plane graphics for PowerPoint! And you can also fly them up your charts, after you decide whether a Column or a Bar chart works best with your data? We then bring you two amazing interviews that have nothing to do with how you design your slides, but everything about how you communicate with your audience. Fred Miller discusses Elevator Speeches, and why these speeches need not be within an elevator, despite their name! And Nancy Ancowitz explains how introverts are different than extroverts while presenting, and not too different too! PowerPoint 2013 users can learn about all sorts of Indent markers that influence how your paragraphs get positioned as a bulleted list within PowerPoint? PowerPoint 2011 for Mac users can explore Viewing Sections and Tips for Custom Shows while PowerPoint 2010 for Windows users can learn about creating Custom Slide Shows. And don't miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



If you have a presentation with a large Section, containing many slides, then you may find that this one Section makes it difficult to see all the other remaining Sections – this is because these many slides cover up so much screen real estate making it difficult for you to see other stuff, such as slides in other Sections. And if you want to drag a slide from one Section to another, you may be at a loss to comprehend what you will end up with. So to counter this problem, you can collapse and expand single and multiple Sections, as explained in this tutorial.



Learn how to collapse/expand Sections in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, slide_management, tutorials

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Monday, March 30, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST



After creating Custom Slide Shows, you would like to view them or present them to your audience. Of course you can access the Custom Shows dialog box, and then select a show and then choose to play it -- but that's a long process indeed. In this tutorial, we will show how you can access the same Custom Show more easily. And, we will also show you how you can set any Custom Show as the default within a presentation -- this means that when you actually play your presentation in Slide Show view, only the slides within the Custom Show you select will be shown!



Learn how to play custom slide shows in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: delivery, slide_management, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Have you seen a glossy highlight that is overlaid on the screens of electronic devices such as tablets, laptops, screens, or even phones? You can see an example of this effect in the figure, below -- the tablet on the left has no such glossy highlight but the tablet on the right does! It's easy to create this glossy highlight in PowerPoint -- even better, you can just create a shape that represents this glossy highlight -- and then use it anywhere you want!



Learn how to add glossy highlights for shapes in PowerPoint.

Categories: design, graphics, powerpoint, shapes, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



When your text paragraphs comprise multiple bulleted levels, you can just use the defaults that PowerPoint provides – this takes care of all paragraph indentation issues. However, to have more control you have to use your own indentation values -- this option makes your text look consistent and clear , as per your needs. Indent Markers visible on the Ruler are probably the easiest way to achieve such structured results. However, this method does not let you precisely position the indentation since you just drag and pull the Indent Markers rather than setting them up via an exact numerical value. Fortunately, you can also set indentation using set numerical values.



Learn how to set text indentation using numerical values in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, text, tutorials

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Friday, March 27, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Fred MillerFred E. Miller is a speaker, an international coach, and an author. His books, No Sweat Public Speaking! and No Sweat Elevator Speech! are bought internationally, and have rave reviews on Amazon.com. His website, NoSweatPublicSpeaking.com, has over two hundred articles and videos on Public Speaking and Presentation Skills. Fred has been interviewed locally and internationally and has written many articles on and off line.

In this conversation, Fred discusses his No Sweat Elevator Speech course.

Geetesh: Elevator speeches are almost always never given in elevators, and as you explain in your course, they are not even all about what we speak! So what exactly does an elevator speech mean in today's world?

Fred: Speaking Opportunities are Business, Career, and Leadership Opportunities! That's my mantra. No one ever challenges it. Why would they!

Delivering an elevator speech is a speaking opportunity and having a super one is useful in a number of settings.

For salespeople and others wanting to promote themselves and their businesses, delivering a great one to a group makes sense. The usual scenario is this: You go to a networking event, social function, or seminar, and the leader says, "Before we get started, let's go around the room and introduce ourselves. When it's your turn, stand up, tell us who you are and what you do. Give us your Elevator Speech!"

The goal here, in front of a group, is for everyone hearing and seeing you to know exactly what you do. Clarity is not optional! Their thoughts should then be:

  • I know what he/she does and I need that! I'm impressed with their Elevator Speech! I'll buttonhole them to schedule a conversation to learn more at the next break.

  • I know what he/she does, but I don't need that product/service right now. However, I'll be comfortable contacting them in the future should that need arise.

  • "I know what he/she does, and they sound like they're very good. I don't need that product/service right now. I am comfortable referring someone I know, who can benefit from what they offer, to have a conversation with them.

Another situation is the One-on-One Elevator Speech. These occur all the time. For instance, we're in line at a theater and the person in front of us says, "I'm Joe. I work in the paint department at Home Depot. What do you do?"

The One-on-One Elevator Speech situation business people are more familiar with is this, "The program tonight will begin at 8:00 o'clock. Arrive a half hour early and network!"

The goal in these one-on-one situations is to dis-qualify. Everyone is not a prospect for what you offer. You are not a potential client for each person you meet. Don't waste major time on minor possibilities! Dis-quality early and often and move on to find someone who can benefit from your expertise and offerings. (You also might find folks offering products and services you need!)

Keep in mind, it is not just what you say, but how you say it. Delivery trumps Content!



Geetesh: Can you tell us more about your How To Craft Your Elevator Speech with No Sweat course -- and what is the largest takeaway for someone who enrolls?

Fred: Two words formed the basis of my Elevator Speech Course and the Elevator Speech Template that is central to the program:

Elevator:

  • Build it by the floor.
  • Everyone doesn’t need to go to the top floor with you.
  • You may want to start on a floor other than the first floor.
  • Sometimes, because of time constraints, floors need to be skipped.
  • The course takes the student through each floor, explaining its purpose and giving examples.

Speech:

  • An Elevator Speech is a "Speaking Opportunity" and a mini-presentation.
  • We perceive really good speakers as Experts.
  • We like to work with Experts.
  • Experts can command more money for their products and services.

A great elevator speech, like all presentations, has two components:

Content:

  • Your message.
  • In this case, What you do and how you do it.

Delivery:

  • Presenting that Content clearly and concisely.
  • Delivery Trumps Content!

You may be the world's leading authority in your area of expertise, but if you don't present in a manner that educates, entertains, and explains, then your audience will never get it! "Getting it!" is the goal of all communication: verbal, written, or visual. The course explains the parts of delivering a great elevator speech / presentation. It names and explains the elements of each of those parts: Verbal Communication and Non-Verbal. The important part is that Non-Verbal trumps Verbal.

There are lessons that discusses the fear of Public Speaking. This fear holds many back from reaching their potential and of course, delivering a great elevator speech. Lectures discuss why we have this fear and give proven nuggets to lessen it. Because such few individuals have a great elevator speech, delivering a superb one will make the individual stand out from the crowd and bring them recognition and business. Sure, it takes work to develop it, and lots of practice to deliver it well, but the learning is in the doing. When we get out of our comfort zones, we make them l-a-r-g-e-r, a good thing!

Especially for Indezine readers, this course, How To Craft Your Elevator Speech with NO SWEAT! is a bargain at $37.00. However, if you go to www.nosweatpublicspeaking.com there is a link where you can get it for a limited time, for only $10.00!

Categories: delivery, interviews, powerpoint, presentation_skills, training

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You have already explored how you can use the First Line Indent Marker and the Hanging Indent Marker to tweak bulleted paragraphs in PowerPoint 2013. By tweaking, we mean adjusting the spacing before and after the bullet character. The next and last of these indent markers on the Ruler is the Left Indent Marker -- this acts like a lock on the First Line Indent Marker and the Hanging Indent Marker. Funnily enough, it is called the Left Indent Marker even though it is placed at right-most of the three markers!



Learn how to adjust the position of bulleted paragraphs using the Left Indent Marker in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, text, tutorials

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Thursday, March 26, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Nancy AncowitzNancy Ancowitz is a business communication coach and author of Self-Promotion for Introverts®. She helps clients—introverts and extroverts alike—connect to and communicate their gifts to bring them fully and authentically into the world. Nancy is a thinking partner and stalwart supporter for these clients, who range from CEOs to emerging leaders in the business and creative worlds. They entrust her with helping them prepare for their most important presentations, job interviews, and other business meetings. For more about Nancy, visit her website at www.nancyancowitz.com and her blog at www.selfpromotionforintroverts.com.

In this conversation, Nancy discusses how introverts can succeed as presenters.

Geetesh: Is it true that extroverts have an advantage over introverts as presenters?

Nancy: Not necessarily. While some extroverts have the gift of gab, many struggle with the fear of being in front of an audience, just as many introverts do. Some extroverts could benefit from learning to express themselves concisely, which is the downside of their tendency to think out loud.

Introverts—those who are energized more by solo activities than social activities—have their own advantages. As an introvert, you're more inclined to speak only once you've done your research about a topic and have thought through what you want to say. So you benefit your audiences by making every word count. You can also use your research abilities to effectively target your audiences—digging around in advance for useful facts and figures that they’ll find compelling. Your ability to listen attentively to your audience's questions is another strength you might offer as a presenter.



Geetesh: You do workshops on this topic (Presentation Skills for Introverts®). Can you share a thought or two about the typical challenges that your participants ask about and how you respond?

Nancy: One of the most common challenges that introverts struggle with is answering tough questions on the spot. What helps? You can typically anticipate the lion's share of questions that your audience will ask. Use your abilities to research and write to craft strong answers and rehearse them out loud, preferably on video—a smartphone is a great tool for that. You'll immediately see how you come across verbally and non-verbally and what you need to adjust.

What about the zingers that hit you from left field, despite your preparation and practice? Buy a little time to gather your thoughts by using some acceptable filler language. An example is commenting on a question you're asked (e.g., “What an interesting question. No one has ever asked me that”). Another is restating or paraphrasing it (“If I understand you correctly, you’re asking what motivated me to cut the budget in half. Is that correct?”) You can also ask a clarifying question (“Are you asking me from the point of view of an employee or a shareholder?”).

Participants in my workshops also ask what to do if their mind goes blank while giving a presentation. The quick answer is that prevention goes a long way toward helping with that. Rehearse the first and last lines of your presentation as well as a few stories you can tell to illustrate your points. If you lose your way mid-sentence, the most important thing to do is to take a breath to relax yourself. Be gentle with yourself and don’t apologize. Instead, in a friendly way, you could ask the audience, “Where was I? I have so many things I want to cover in our limited time together.” If you make everything about serving your audience, by informing, educating, inspiring, and/or persuading them, you’ll have nothing to lose.

See Also: An Interview with Nancy Ancowitz

Categories: interviews, opinion, powerpoint, presentation_skills

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Have you wondered about how your paragraphs get positioned as a bulleted list within PowerPoint? How is the indenting space calculated, and how can you make changes that can alter those spaces? These changes are essentially influenced by three types of Indent Markers. Of the three Indent Markers you can see on the Ruler, the Hanging Indent Marker is used to tweak the position of the paragraph following the bullet.



Learn to tweak the position of paragraphs in bulleted lists using the Hanging Indent Marker in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, text, tutorials

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST



Custom Slide Shows, as indicated by their name itself, are Slide Shows customized by the user. The purpose of creating a Custom Slide Show is to display only selected slides from your presentation, without deleting the slides you do not want to show. To understand a Custom Slide Show, think of your individual slides as songs -- then a Custom Slide Show is a playlist of those songs! Even better, since this is like a playlist, you do not have to delete the slides that are not used. And there's more -- you can create any number of Custom Slide Shows from a single presentation!



Learn how to create Custom Slide Shows in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: delivery, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Paper Planes represent aims, ambitions, goals and targets – and you can use these paper plane graphics in your slides to denote any such achievement. Most of the time, people just use arrows on their slides to highlight a certain area – but you can also use these paper planes instead – and you can also animate them to land right on target – exactly where you want them placed!



Download and use these paper plane graphics on your slides.

Categories: design, graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Custom Shows can add a completely different dimension to your presentations -- the same slides can be used for multiple Custom Shows and can help you decide what you want to show to any given audience. Creating and using Custom Shows is an advanced use of PowerPoint -- here are some tips that will help you get more from this amazing feature in PowerPoint 2011.



Learn some tips for creating Custom Slide Shows in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Tuesday, March 24, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



You get another part of our Irregular Shapes series -- this 9th series has larger, curved shapes. We then discuss why bar charts work better than column charts, especially if you have longer axis labels. We explore slides with video Countdown Timers. We also have an exclusive conversation with David Tang of Flevy Tools, a free PowerPoint add-in that creates diagrams and charts in PowerPoint. We then explore the Learning Dashboard in Adobe Presenter, another add-in for PowerPoint. PowerPoint 2013 users can learn about copying text attributes with the Format Painter. We also look at reordering Sections, and indent markets for bulleted lists. PowerPoint 2011 for Mac users can learn about reordering Sections and comparing / merging presentations. And don't miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Categories: ezine, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You have already learned about the indent markers on the Horizontal Ruler, and how they can influence the bulleted paragraph on your PowerPoint slide. There are three types of Indent Markers you can find on the Horizontal Ruler: the First Line Indent Marker, the Hanging Indent Marker, and the Left Indent Marker. In this tutorial, let us learn how the First Line Indent Marker influences the position of the bullets.



Learn how to tweak the bullets using the First Line Indent Marker in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, text, tutorials

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Monday, March 23, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



So what's the difference between a Column Chart and a Bar Chart? Purists may call them both bar charts and some charting folks may also find many, many differences between them -- but broadly speaking, a bar chart is a column chart that’s rotated 90 degrees -- and what a difference those 90 degrees make! It's amazing that so much can change with such a small adjustment.



Should you use a Column chart or a Bar chart?

Categories: charting, powerpoint, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



If your presentation has a number of Sections, you may find it little difficult to reorder your Sections by just dragging and dropping. Or you may even find it difficult to see all Sections at the same time. This happens because there may be many slides within each of these Sections. And if you want to drag a slide between the one Section to another, you may be at a loss to comprehend what you will end up with. So to counter this problem, you can collapse and expand single and multiple Sections, as explained in this tutorial.



Learn how to collapse/expand Sections in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, tutorials

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Friday, March 20, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



The similarity between a Bar Chart and a Column Chart is that both display the same data using rectangular bars. The length of these bars is proportional to the data value. Also, both are used to compare two or more values. So what is the difference? The difference lies in their orientation -- and henceforth the perspective with which we humans comprehend the data. A Bar Chart is oriented horizontally and a Column Chart is oriented vertically (see our Column or Bar Chart? tutorial). This small variance can make a lot of difference depending upon how large your chart data is, or how lengthy your Category Axis Labels are.



Explore why the Bar chart type may be better suited than the Column chart type for the charts with longer Axis Labels.

Categories: charting, powerpoint, tutorials

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



In PowerPoint, Sections are not just for effective and easy management of your slides, but they can also let you quickly reorder large blocks of adjacent slides. All you got to do is to place all slides you want to reorder within a single Section, and then move that Section along with all the slides that it contains. In this tutorial we'll show you how you can reorder Sections within PowerPoint 2013.



Learn how to reorder Sections in PowerPoint 2013.

Categories: powerpoint_2013, slide_management, tutorials

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Thursday, March 19, 2015
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



David TangDavid Tang is the founder of Flevy, a marketplace for premium business documents. Prior to Flevy, David worked as a management consultant for 8 years. His consulting experience spans corporate strategy, marketing, operations, and change management -- both domestic and international (EMEA + APAC). David graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor's and Master's in engineering.

In this conversation, David discusses Flevy Tools, an add-in for PowerPoint that creates several chart and diagram types.

Geetesh: What motivated you to create Flevy Tools, an entirely free add-in for PowerPoint that provides so many chart and diagram types?

David: When we first launched our company Flevy, we decided to create and give away Flevy Tools, as a way to reach PowerPoint business users. At the time, Flevy Tools only provided 4 diagram types. Over time, Flevy Tools became increasingly popular and we released more and more diagrams types. The latest version released in March 2015 contains 12 diagram types, including such common business diagrams as Gantt charts, waterfall charts, and pyramids. We have even received testimonials from management consultants at Accenture and Capgemini stating Flevy Tools is better than their in-house PowerPoint diagramming tools.



To provide some context, our company Flevy is a marketplace for high quality business documents. Most of our documents are PowerPoints, ranging from business training guides to presentation templates. This is why we thought Flevy Tools would appeal to our audience.

Geetesh: Can you tell us about the new Matrix Charts and Value Chain Diagrams, introduced in the newest release of Flevy Tools?

David: Certainly. Matrix Charts are very simple, intuitive visuals. They typically take the form of 2x2 or 3x3 matrices. There are many established management models represented by the Matrix Chart, such as the BCG Matrix and GE-McKinsey Matrix. Using Flevy Tools, you can create Matrix Charts of up to 5x5 size (e.g. 2x3, 4x4, 1x5, etc.).



Our Value Chain Diagram is modeled after the Porter Value Chain, introduced by strategist Michael Porter. A Value Chain Diagram is essentially a multi-layered Chevron Diagram. Using Flevy Tools, you can create Value Chain Diagrams of up to 6 chevrons (on the top level). Each top-level chevron can then be sub-divided into up to 6 parallel streams.



Categories: add-in, interviews, powerpoint

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posted by Geetesh on 9:00 AM IST



Imagine this situation: you are working on a presentation with your client, or a co-worker -- then, instead of working on the same copy one after the other, you worked on two different copies. These copies contain changes done by you both. Some changes may be similar and some may be different. Now you need to compare and merge these copies into a single, cohesive file without losing anything important!



Learn how to compare and merge presentations in PowerPoint 2011.

Categories: office_mac, powerpoint_2011, slide_management, tutorials

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