This is the print version of this page. All content is copyright Indezine.com 2000- .



PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: January 2016

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

See Also:
PowerPoint and Presenting Notes
PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary
PowerPoint Programming

Subscribe to this blog



Default Behaviors for Action Buttons in PowerPoint 2013

Friday, January 29, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST



Once you place Action Buttons on your slide in PowerPoint 2013, you can make them do all sorts of actions when clicked. What sets Action Buttons apart from other shape types in PowerPoint is the iconography they contain. For most users, an icon such as a leftwards arrow indicates moving to the previous slide and a rightwards arrow does indicate progressing to the next slide. Another advantage of these icon-equipped Action Buttons is that they are language independent, and can work very well in multi-language and international presentations. In this tutorial, you are going to explore the different types of Action Buttons, and their default behaviors.



Explore the different types of Action buttons and their default behavior in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



This collection of world maps is all circled! Each continent is a collection of circles that overlap each other or stay adjacent. Circle-style maps make your slides look different and simpler. You get six styles of fills in both Standard and Widescreen aspect ratios. All colors used are Theme aware, and each land area is a separate group – easily accessed via the Selection Pane in PowerPoint.



Download and use these maps in your slides.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



PowerPoint has three types of text container: text placeholders, text boxes, and shapes -- we explain Shapes in our comprehensive section on Shape tutorials -- let us now look at the other two text container types. Aren't text placeholders and text boxes the same? Are they different? Moreover, why should we bother even if they are different? All these are valid questions, and the answers to them form one of the most important foundations in learning to create more structured presentations.



Learn about the differences between text placeholders and text boxes in PowerPoint 2016.

Labels: , , , , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, January 28, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Shapes may look basic or even primitive, but they are the building blocks of almost anything you create on your PowerPoint slides. Fortunately, you are not deprived of choices because PowerPoint provides plenty of shapes, neatly categorized into nine types. Among all the shape types, Action Buttons behave differently -- these are essentially rectangular shapes that are used as navigation aids to navigate between slides, or even another presentation, document, or a web URL.



Learn how to insert an Action button on a slide in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, January 27, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



We explored Design Styles in Sway. There are several Design Styles that you can apply. Even better, you are not restricted to the Styles available because Sway allows you to customize any existing Style so that you can make the end results more personalized.



Learn how you can customize Design Styles in Sway.

Labels: , , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, January 26, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



Do you want to hear presenting questions from everyday people, and also someone who can answer them? Then you will love TJ Walker's special Indezine podcast.

We then show you how you can add a Design Style in Sway. PowerPoint 2013 users can then explore hyperlinking text, transparent hyperlinks, automatic text hyperlinks, and also editing hyperlinks. Finally, you will not want to miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Labels: ,

0 comments




Monday, January 25, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Once you access the Design pane in Sway, you will be presented with a bewildering array of Design Styles that can change the appearance of your Sway. So how do you navigate and choose from these many options?



Learn how to change Design Styles in Microsoft Sway.

Labels: , , , ,

0 comments




Friday, January 22, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Design is an individual preference. Something that you love may not appeal to a friend, but that does not make that person less friendly! The reverse is also true, and that’s why it's so cool that at least you can change the design of your Sways with one click. You get to keep your friends and designs -- this is a win-win situation!



Learn how you can use the Design options in Sway.

Labels: , , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, January 21, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 5:22 PM IST

A few months ago, TJ Walker and I communicated - via phone, email, and almost any other way possible. It was great talking to him, and this mail today is a result of those conversations. TJ is the founder of Media Training Worldwide and has been conducting media training workshops and seminars since 1984. Walker has trained Presidents of countries, Prime Ministers, Nobel Peace Prize winners, Super Bowl winners, U.S. Senators, Miss Universes and Members of Parliament.

So how does this help you? You probably will not get TJ to personally train you, but who knows what's going to happen in the future? However, there's nothing like the present, and TJ agreed to answer some specific questions for Indezine subscribers!



So here's an exclusive podcast from TJ that addresses you!

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Once you add a hyperlink to a slide object, you will want to edit the link, or remove it altogether. Both these tasks are easy to accomplish – and as usual, there’s more than one way to do the same task in PowerPoint 2013.



Learn how you can edit and remove hyperlinks in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, January 20, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Type or paste a web URL in your PowerPoint slide, and then press either the Enter or the Spacebar key. Presto, your web URL is now a live hyperlink. Now this automatic conversion to hyperlinks can be a mixed blessing. In some ways, it can be beneficial because most of the time, this automatic conversion may just be what you need! In other scenarios, you may get offended by PowerPoint’s hand holding. Luckily, there are ways in which you can control this automatic conversion. You can turn off this automatic hyperlinking for a single link, and you can also toggle on and off this conversion altogether!



Learn how to control automatic text hyperlinking in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, January 19, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



Sway is probably the best thing that has happened to presentations, and who better than Chris Pratley who evolved Sway into existence to share the reasoning behind Sway? We bring you an exclusive conversation! We then look at a cool tool from Jamie Garroch that lets you painlessly embed Vimeo videos in your PowerPoint slides. We then explore the entire terminology of Linking in PowerPoint.

We then show you how you can link within slides, between presentations, and even to web URLs using PowerPoint 2013 for Windows. Finally, you will not want to miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Labels: ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Why would you add a hyperlink to any slide object within PowerPoint? There may be many answers to that question, but if we had to choose one answer that would be true all the time, it would be to add value to your slides and enhance their capabilities. However, these hyperlinks are two-edged swords because when you create a hyperlink, you may be telling your audience that it is a link!



Learn how you can add transparent hyperlinks to text or any other slide object in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Monday, January 18, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Anything that you can select within a PowerPoint slide can serve as an anchor. While all slide objects can function as anchors, text does have some characteristics that make it work as a “visible” anchor. Unlike other anchors, hyperlinked text in PowerPoint is underlined automatically – and thus visible as an anchor. We will explore the different aspects of text anchors in PowerPoint 2013 within this tutorial.



Learn how you can use text as an anchor to create links in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Thursday, January 14, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Linking from within PowerPoint allows you to use your slides as a jumping point to provide even more content! We all know that the internet is a storehouse of so much content, and sometimes you may want a click on your slide to open a web page. Show the web page to your audience, close it and you are back on the slide you clicked. You can now seamlessly move on to your next slide. This sort of activity is easy to recreate.



Learn how you can link to web pages from PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Wednesday, January 13, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Jamie GarrochJamie Garroch, CEO of YOUpresent (formerly GMARK) founded the company to provide presentation professionals with presentation software, content and training. Jamie uses a range of presentation and e-learning tools on PC and Mac from PowerPoint to Keynote, Adobe CS and iSpring for presentations and Articulate Storyline for e-learning. He also uses PowerPoint as a programming environment to create authoring automation for his company's productivity needs, custom add-ins for clients and off-the-shelf products for presentation designers.

In this conversation, Jamie discusses the Vimeo embed abilities within his G-Tools add-in for PowerPoint.

Geetesh: Tell us more about your Vimeo embed feature that's part of your G-Tools add-in?

Jamie: PowerPoint 2013 and 2010 have built in support for a media player that can stream YouTube videos from the Internet during a presentation. However, it's not obvious from the feature, which can be found in the Ribbon under Insert | Video | Online Video | From a Video Embed Code, that the embed code option only supports YouTube (refer to Microsoft Requirements for using the PowerPoint YouTube feature).



Vimeo embed codes just get rejected. The Vimeo embed feature in G-Tools provides an answer for users wanting to stream Vimeo videos within their slide shows by taking your embed code and creating a flash video player on your slide. Flash players can't run in the normal view so playback, bookmarks and animation aren't possible but it does allow you to play Vimeo videos in your slide show.



Geetesh: What motivated you to create this extra feature for Vimeo embeds -- also what are your favorite features in G-Tools??

Jamie:While it's possible to manually insert a Flash object into a slide and set it up to support Vimeo videos, it's technically challenging. So we thought it would be nice to build a Vimeo video feature into our G-Tools add-in. It supports both the older and new versions of the Vimeo embed codes and sets up the Flash player for you based on your selected options.

Aside from this new feature, G-Tools has around 30 tools for presentation designers with our favorites being Add Shape to Group, Text-To-Outline and the shape Adjustment Painter as they are great time savers for presentation designers using PowerPoint on a frequent basis. G-Tools is also available at a huge discount for a limited period in exchange for a tweet!

Labels: , , , ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



We already explored how you can link from an anchor object to any slide within the active presentation. However, this sort of linking is only the beginning of the possibilities for linking that PowerPoint 2013 provides. To take this to the next level, we will learn how you can link from an anchor object to any other PowerPoint presentation. In fact, you can also link to a particular slide in another presentation too!



Learn to link to another PowerPoint presentation in PowerPoint 2013.

Labels: , , , , ,

0 comments




Tuesday, January 12, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:30 AM IST



What if you could get some cards that let you brainstorm ideas for your next presentation? That is what Peter Watts talks about in this exclusive conversation about some cards called Dirty Rhetoric. There's so much more happening with the release of iSpring Suite 8, easily one of the most full-featured PowerPoint add-ins available. Moreover, with Star Wars being the rage once again, would you like to add a Star Wars like credits animation in your PowerPoint? We've got you covered with a detailed tutorial, plus some sample slides to download!

We then explore the interface in the new PowerPoint 2016 for Mac. We also have a bunch of Sway tutorials that explore Comparison, SlideShow, and Grid Group Cards. Finally, you will not want to miss the new discussions and templates of this week!



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

Labels: ,

0 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



While you can link from an anchor object on a slide to almost anywhere, you will certainly want first to explore how you can link between slides in the same presentation. This is simple to do, and also very useful because it lets you use your presentation in a non-linear way and you are not limited to viewing your slides in a sequential order.



Learn how you can link between slides in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows.

Labels: , , , , , ,

0 comments




Monday, January 11, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Chris PratleyChris Pratley is General Manager of Microsoft Sway, a new member of the Office suite of apps. His team also develops Docs.com, a social publishing site for professionals that features high fidelity Office content, and Office Lens, a cross-platform mobile app to turn photos of documents and whiteboards into reusable content in OneNote, Word and other apps. Chris lives in Seattle with his wife and two sons.

In this conversation, Chris talks about Microsoft Sway.

Geetesh: Sway is such a fantastic idea – how did it all begin?

Chris: The idea for Sway arose from a number of inputs.

An underlying motivation came from years of watching and interacting with customers, and realizing that many users – and really all of us, at least, some of the time – don't have the time to master the powerful tools in Office, or the skills to use them properly; both knowledge of the product functions and features and design skills to get a great looking result. I felt it was worth exploring whether we could make a breakthrough in ease of use for such people in such moments.

A few years ago when I was running Office Labs (an internal Office incubation effort), we looked at trends in information publishing and saw that several factors were changing or going to change what people needed to make. The rise of mobile, especially for reading, was going to create havoc for people trying to "write once and be read anywhere". The classic tools for doing design and layout all assumed a fixed output size, and this problem was going to grow: how to make something that looks great and is readable on any size of screen? (potentially from watch to wall size, but mostly in the 4"-20" range, and at different pixel resolutions). Just think about the problem of arranging two images when viewed in landscape or portrait– you would make different choices: side by side or one above the other. Text needs to be readable on a phone, so it has to be kept about the same effective point size while other media is scaled and rearranged to fit the device. Simply zooming a print layout usually doesn’t work (we've all experienced the horror of trying to read a letter sized PDF on a phone).

On top of that, there has been a shift in the quality and quantity of designed output. Web sites and apps are showing us content that is stylishly presented, with media, animations, and interactive elements. This is true digital media, not created for paper and moved to the web. Ordinary people don't have the skills to make such output. People aren't satisfied with canned templates either – often these are too limiting or they make your output look like everyone else's. One of the strengths of Office is empowering people to easily make great output, and this new type of output is what Sway is designed to make easy.

Microsoft Sway
Sway responsively adapts its layout to optimally fit the device it is being viewed on

The north star for Sway is to let a user focus on their content and message and fully automate the rest (formatting, layout, gathering media, handling references, etc). Our goal is to deliver an experience similar to shopping for a fancy suit or custom wedding dress. As the customer, you can just take the suggestion of an expert (easy!), or choose what you like and don't like, and an expert will make adjustments and show you options to choose from until you are satisfied. With clothes, you don't need to know anything about lapels, cuffs, stitches, fabric, etc. All you have to have is an opinion. Similarly, our goal is that Sway will analyze your content and suggest a good design and layout for you. To customize, rather than make you become an expert, Sway will respond to your likes and dislikes, always generating consistent and professionally designed results. If you don't like what you see, giving direction is easy, much like how Pandora gets to know your music tastes by what you listen to or skip, and what others like you listen to, without you specifying genre, beats per minute, etc. Of course if you have the inclination and skills, you'll be able to dive in and specify whatever you want, but the great majority of people have neither the time nor the talent for that.

To deliver the full experience, it became clear that we needed to have a new "user contract". WYSIWYG and direct formatting were great when they arrived in the 80s, but they have trained us all to believe that formatting content is a manual process and every detail must be specified. More challenging for this problem is that people then expect things to stay exactly as they specified, which makes adapting to the device very hard, and makes browsing different designs in a coherent and consistent way nearly impossible. Once you get in the habit of working that way, changing habit and expectation is hard. To give us the flexibility to do automated design and on-the-fly layout for different device sizes, we needed to develop a new user experience where the user could express their intent, rather than specific values or results. We also knew that people would not tolerate such a fundamental change in their familiar tools, so we needed a new app. From all that came Sway, a tool for telling stories in an authentically digital way.

Microsoft Sway
You can pick one of your images as inspiration for a new color palette

Geetesh: Sway is so different compared to PowerPoint, and yet there are comparisons. What's your answer?

Chris: Sway is its own thing – another tool in the toolbox. It is great at things other apps are not, and vice versa. But it is natural to try to understand new things in terms of existing, familiar things. True, you can use Sway for presentations, which is where the comparison to PowerPoint comes from. You can also use it for documents – that overlaps with word processors. You can share Sways as a URL viewed in the browser, so they are sort of web pages too. Since you can use Sway to gather media and coauthor together with others, I've even heard people say it is like OneNote. The point is that Sway can be used for many purposes. Within Office, it will both add new use cases and displace some usage of Word and PowerPoint – but generally where those apps were never optimal to start with: adaptive, digital-first storytelling, with interactivity, non-linear branching and drill ins, A/V support, etc.

Let me use OneNote as an analogy. I also developed OneNote from the beginning, and back then people would say "Isn't that Word? Or maybe Outlook, because of the ToDos?" Yet today it is clear that OneNote is a tool for managing information and collaborating with others in an unstructured way. The only similarity with Word is that is does basic text editing. Did OneNote displace some usage of Word for notetaking? Of course it did, but Word was never meant to be a note taking tool anyway – it is designed for writing documents. Now there is a better, more focused experience in OneNote.

More specifically with respect to Sway and PowerPoint, the apps are really very different. PowerPoint offers a huge set of tools to construct 2D layouts (slides) with animations, etc. exactly to a user's specification. Sway does not make slides at all, and does not offer any 2D layout control (since that is antithetical to being "responsive" to the device). Sway allows a user to view a Sway screen by screen (group by group) which is useful for delivering a presentation, but that is closer to Word's reading view than to PowerPoint. My theory is that because Sway is so naturally oriented toward media, graphics and design, people see a visual and experiential similarity to PowerPoint, but in reality a Sway is closer to a Word document in that it reflows. Yet unlike Word, it is much more structured, which is what allows Sway to easily adjust style and layout on the user's behalf.

This line of thinking is missing the point though. A Sway is a new thing, designed for our digital world, not for paper or for 35mm slides. It is meant to be flexible, and to respect the author's intent rather than rely on rigid programming or specifications. It is alive – dynamic and interactive by default. As we’ve come to say, Sway is a tool for telling your story. That story could be a school book report, a business analysis, a sales pitch, a bedtime story.

As with any new tool, we are seeing early adopters using it and figuring out its strengths. We'll see others come to it in the next year who are inspired by those leaders, and as more people experience Sways made by others, they will come to understand its use cases better, and usage will spread broadly after that. At the same time Sway will be growing in richness of content types, level of control and customization, and intelligence – all of which will accelerate adoption.

Here is an example of a Sway that uses the screen by screen visualization. It can be used for live presentation or as a standalone story. Click on maps and media to interact.

Labels: , , ,

1 comments




posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Linking (or hyperlinking) makes objects and documents “connected” to each other. To provide an analogy, consider each slide or presentation to be an individual computer on a network. Individual computers do some awesome work, but the network is much more useful, and increases the worth of each individual computer. In this case, the linking adds the “network” to your PowerPoint files. Linking can happen from one slide to another, or even to another file or a website from within PowerPoint presentations. In each of these linking scenarios, you will find that three factors are always present.



Learn about the prerequisites for linking in PowerPoint.

Labels: , , ,

0 comments




Friday, January 08, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Peter WattsPeter Watts is a coach and trainer who helps presenters around the world to find their voice on the stage. He is a contributor to the Huffington Post and blogs about all things to do with public speaking at The Presenters’ Blog. You can follow him on Twitter @speak2all

In this conversation, Peter talks about Dirty Rhetoric, a deck of cards that help people communicate their ideas better. Peter created this deck in collaboration with Gavin McMahon.

Geetesh: Can you tell us more about Dirty Rhetoric, and how did you and Gavin grow this idea?

Peter: If you're producing a presentation or crafting a keynote, what to do when it comes to the words on the slide? Sure you can put in another boring bullet point, but wouldn't a magical turn of phrase be better? Something that becomes "quote-worthy" among your audience? For that, PowerPoint won't help you, but rhetoric will. Dirty Rhetoric, that is.

Dirty Rhetoric Cards

Dirty Rhetoric is a deck of 53 cards that create a complete communications toolkit. It's based on classical rhetoric. These rhetorical techniques are used every day by professional speech-writers. Every one of them has been tried and tested by communicators ranging from Abraham Lincoln to Steve Jobs. The difference is that while classical rhetoric is classically difficult to understand, we've taken those skills and made them quick and dirty -- hence the name -- Dirty Rhetoric!

In the age of the Internet, the amount of information and communications doubles every eighteen months. As a communicator, if you don’t double your skills every 18 months then you won't be heard. Double the size means to double the noise, so you need to double your game.

Communicators who don't do this, are simply drowned out in the roar, and that's the challenge that Gavin and I set out to meet when we created Dirty Rhetoric.

Whether you are speechwriting, presenting, direct marketing, creating digital content, or even essay-writing, Dirty Rhetoric puts all the necessary verbal skills directly in front of you and in a format that's as easy to follow as a recipe card!

Effective communication is all about how you get your own message out while also observing and learning from the techniques that other people are using to propel their own communications. As the American writer Lawrence Clark Powell put it, "Write to be understood, speak to be heard, read to grow". Those are the three goals that Dirty Rhetoric hits for its users.

Geetesh: How can someone get the Dirty Rhetoric cards now?

Peter: We're incredibly keen to expose the cards to as wide an audience as possible, so we've chosen to launch them through KickStarter. You can also find us at www.dirtyrhetoric.com. We have a range of opening offers from simple decks of the cards through to multi-packs and t-shirts and posters. We hope to attract as diverse an audience as possible, and also to have the chance to communicate with that audience moving forward.

Labels: , , ,

0 comments








Microsoft and the Office logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Home | PowerPoint | Photoshop | PowerPoint Templates | PowerPoint Tutorials | Blog | Notes | Ezine | Advertise | Feedback | Site Map | About Us | Contact Us

Link to Us | Privacy | Testimonials

PowerPoint Backgrounds | Christian PowerPoint Backgrounds | Business PowerPoint Presentation Templates

Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape

©2000-2016, Geetesh Bajaj. All rights reserved.

since November 02, 2000