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PowerPoint and Presenting Blog: October 2016

Thoughts and impressions of whatever is happening in the world of PowerPoint

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PowerPoint and Presenting Glossary
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Insert and/or Link Pictures in PowerPoint 2013

Monday, October 31, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



When a picture is inserted on your PowerPoint slide, you are essentially doing a task that is frequent and commonplace -- and to you, this may look like an activity that's simple. But behind this simple task, there are options you may not be aware of. You know that pictures located in any of your folders can be inserted on a slide. However, have you wondered about the relation a picture on the slide has with the original picture located in your folder? By default, PowerPoint retains no relation -- even if you delete or move the original picture file you inserted, the copy on your slide will still be retained since PowerPoint saves the picture as a part of the file it creates. Yet, there are options within PowerPoint that let you maintain the relation between the original picture and the inserted picture -- for example, if you make changes to your original picture, PowerPoint will update its copy on the slide!



Learn about the advanced options available for inserting and/or linking pictures in PowerPoint 2013.

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Friday, October 28, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Did someone say that pictures show what words can tell? Yes, it is true that both pictures and words are important, and they both play complementary roles. If you had to choose just one of them; then seeing is a much more important part of presenting. Presentations, by their very nature, are meant to be seen since they evoke actions such as project, display, or broadcast; and all of these actions represent visual media. Text and speaking are important too, but you can be more effectively heard and remembered if your content includes both text and pictures.



Learn how to insert a picture on a slide in PowerPoint 2013.

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Thursday, October 27, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The Quick Access Toolbar or QAT is the only toolbar available for customization in PowerPoint. Within the QAT, you can place your most used commands so that they are accessible to you with just a single click. We already explored how you can change the location of the QAT and other tricks in our Quick Access Toolbar in PowerPoint 2010 tutorial. In this tutorial, we will explore how you can further customize the QAT in PowerPoint 2010.



Learn how to customize Quick Access Toolbar in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Wednesday, October 26, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Although the entire concept behind the Ribbon interface in PowerPoint 2010 was to do away with menus and toolbars, one toolbar still exists, and this entirely customizable toolbar is called the Quick Access Toolbar, or the QAT for short. Even without any customization, this toolbar contains the Save, Undo, and Redo icons, but you can use it to store many more of your often used commands.



Learn about Quick Access Toolbar in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Tuesday, October 25, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:00 AM IST

Do you want to be part of a new presentation industry body? Learn more about the Presentation Guild in an exclusive interview with Echo Swinford. We also bring you some in-depth tutorials that discuss using fonts in PowerPoint. First, we look at whether a particular font can be embedded within PowerPoint. Then we look at safe fonts, and finally we explore four alternatives to safe fonts.

In the Tutorials section, PowerPoint 2016 and 2013 users can learn about hiding and unhiding slides. PowerPoint 2010 users can learn about packaging slides, creating handouts in Word, and general PowerPoint program options. Finally, do not miss the new press releases and templates of this week.



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The Ribbon that you see within the PowerPoint interface was designed to solve a problem. Older versions of PowerPoint that were populated with menus and toolbars ended with so many submenus and toolbars that many users did not know if a specific feature even existed in PowerPoint. Even worse, the toolbars could occupy so much screen real estate that you would be left with a much smaller area for your slide! Enter the Ribbon which did help resolve some of these problems, but it came with a problem of its own: it did not provide customization options when first introduced in PowerPoint 2007. This was quickly rectified in PowerPoint 2010.



Learn to add and rename Ribbon tabs in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Monday, October 24, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The Advanced tab of the PowerPoint Options dialog box contains advanced, and some not-so-advanced options related to the appearance and working of the PowerPoint interface. Changes to these options can result in a very different and more efficient workflow. The PowerPoint Options dialog box can be accessed in multiple ways, as explained in our Backstage View - Program Options in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows tutorial. In this tutorial, we will explore the various options within the Advanced tab of the PowerPoint Options dialog box.



Learn about advanced Program Options in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Friday, October 21, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

We learned about using safe fonts in PowerPoint, especially if you want to share your slides with others who may not have the required fonts. In simple terms, this means using fonts such as Calibri, Arial, or Times New Roman in your slides so that almost anyone can see the slides identically -- as you see them! Sometimes, this may not be a bad idea, but you do have to narrow down your choices to the bare basics. Fortunately, there are some alternatives to safe fonts too -- and some of these may work for you. The best part is that you may be able to show your slides with the fonts that you like!



Learn about alternatives to safe fonts in PowerPoint.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



The General tab of the PowerPoint Options dialog box contains basic, yet some very important options related to the appearance and working of the PowerPoint interface. Changes to these options can result in a very different and more efficient workflow. The PowerPoint Options dialog box can be accessed in multiple ways, as explained in our Backstage View - Program Options in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows tutorial. In this tutorial, we will explore the various options within the General tab of the PowerPoint Options dialog box. Follow these steps to understand better.



Learn about General Program options in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Thursday, October 20, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST



Did you use your favorite fonts in PowerPoint, and then discovered that when you moved the presentation to another computer, the fonts were substituted with another font? Worse, even this change is not predictable. You may find that the font change behavior is not consistent, and the same font may be substituted completely differently on a third computer!



Learn about using safe fonts in PowerPoint.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Do you have a secret slide with useful information that you would rather not delete? But what if you show this slide to your audience inadvertently? How do you cope with this problem? The solution is easy: you just hide the slide. Hidden slides don’t show up in Slide Show view, but they are still available to edit and to possibly unhide when you are ready to show that slide to the world.



Learn how to hide and unhide slides in PowerPoint 2016.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Yes, you can embed some fonts in PowerPoint presentations, and the catch-word in the preceding word is "some." Yes, only a few fonts allow embedding within PowerPoint presentations, and even those have limitations. These limitations are due to the license associated with the font. This article will understand what these licenses are, and which limitations get imposed.



Explore which fonts allow embedding within your PowerPoint presentations.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Do you have a secret slide with useful information that you would rather not delete? But what if you show this slide to your audience inadvertently? How do you cope with this problem? The solution is easy: you just hide the slide. Hidden slides don’t show up in Slide Show view, but they are still available to edit and to possibly unhide when you are ready to show that slide to the world.



Learn how to hide and unhide slides in PowerPoint 2013.

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Tuesday, October 18, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:00 AM IST

Presenters always want a way to record their presentations—at least the slides and their narrative if not their body language.Jake Pechtel of Techsmith explains how you can achieve this objective using Camtasia. Nancy Duarte speaks about her upcoming keynote at the Presentation Summit. She also explains how she prioritizes what needs to be done. If you missed the recently concluded Outstanding Presentations 2016 webinar series, then read what Ellen Finkelstein says about her small window that will allow you to get all recordings. We also feature Ida Shessel, who delivered one of the same webinars.

In the Tutorials section, PowerPoint 2013 users can learn about inserting org charts, and adding shapes or changing layouts for these org charts. PowerPoint 2010 users can learn about embedding fonts in their presentations. Finally, do not miss the new press releases and templates of this week.



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You may create the best presentation in the world, but what happens after the presentation has been delivered? Don’t you want to provide the information you presented in a document that you can distribute to attendees, or even send them a recap via email? Handouts are meant for such occasions, and PowerPoint lets you create some amazing handouts from your slides, that can also contain extra notes that were not visible on the slides. In this tutorial, we will explore an amazing option that creates handouts for PowerPoint presentations in Microsoft Word.



Learn how to output Handouts in Word from PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Monday, October 17, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Echo SwinfordA Microsoft PowerPoint MVP since 2000, Echo Swinford began her PowerPoint career in 1997. She holds a Master's degree in New Media from the Indiana University School of Informatics and is the owner of Echosvoice, a PowerPoint consulting firm specializing in custom template development, presentation creation, makeovers and cleanup, and training for large and small corporate clients. Echo has written and co-written five PowerPoint books, developed a number of video publications, and has a string of tech editing credits to her name. She is the President of the Presentation Guild, a not-for-profit trade association for the presentation industry.

In this conversation, Echo discusses the Presentation Guild.

Geetesh: What is The Presentation Guild, who can become a member, what does it entail, and what are the benefits that members receive?

Echo: The Presentation Guild is a brand spankin’ new association for those of us working in the presentations industry. The main purpose of the Guild to support people who support presentations in all the many and varied ways we do: designing slides, developing stories, coding software, operating graphics systems during meetings, the list goes on and on. We also want to bring awareness of our industry to the larger community in order to increase our opportunities to improve presentations everywhere.

A lot of us work on our own, and one big benefit the Presentation Guild brings is a built-in network with a variety of networking opportunities: periodic town halls and online social gatherings, member discussion forums, and a chat app so anyone who’s online can chat real-time.

We are also focusing on areas that help members expand their knowledge and skill sets: Microsoft demonstrated PowerPoint’s new Zoom tools in a webinar for us, Julie Terberg’s Inspired by Design webinar is on monthly, and we have upcoming members-only webinars about creating infographics in PowerPoint, making sense of legalese, and a Q&A session with Nancy Duarte. We have a number of other educational pieces with much more in the works.

We’ve also just completed our first salary survey, which will be published later this year and which members will receive free. Future planned benefits include portfolio pages and a job board on the Guild website, and one of our primary goals is to establish a certification program for presentation specialists.

As you can see, a LOT is happening, and we can’t wait for you to join us!

Currently, the annual membership fee is $99. Use discount code INDEZINE for $10 off when you join.

Presentation Guild Launch Party

Geetesh: Echo, you’ve spearheaded this whole idea to create the Presentation Guild from concept to fruition. Tell us about this journey, and also about the official launch later this month.

Echo: Well, I can’t really take credit for it. The PowerPoint MVPs have actually been talking about the need for an association for presentation professionals for many years. But for me personally, the catalyst was when I was reinstalling some Adobe products, and the “I am a: ____” question appeared during the signup process. I think that dropdown listed every kind of design I could imagine... except for presentation design. And I finally decided I’d had it, that I was tired of never having an option to select that actually represents what I do.

So I called the various people I’d been discussing this with for the past gazillion years and said, “It’s time. We need to do this.” And amazingly enough, they were all on board.

It began with me, Sandy Johnson, Steve Rindsberg, Charles Cranford, Marsh Makstein, and Glenna Shaw. We hammered out the mission and vision statement and started working on our business plan and bylaws, both of which were necessary because we felt it was important that we be officially recognized as a not-for-profit organization. And maybe a little bit because it made things feel that much more real to us. We rounded out our Board of Directors to include Tony Ramos, Stephy Lewis, Ric Bretschneider, Rick Altman, Julie Terberg, and you (Geetesh Bajaj) and added Advisory Board members Nancy Duarte, Garr Reynolds, Cliff Atkinson, and Jerry Weissman.

We started telling people what we were up to during the 2015 Presentation Summit. We held a meeting with about fifteen trusted colleagues at the Hard Rock Cafe next to our hotel, where we laid out our ideas and spent the rest of the time brainstorming the types of benefits we’d like to see happen eventually. This is the group we’ve leaned on for help as we’ve gotten the Guild up and running. We call them, appropriately enough, the Hardrockers, and they have been a huge help as we’ve gotten things going.

Over the next two years the board met every other week and worked a lot in between, and now, at last, we’re ready to launch! We’ll all be in Las Vegas for the Presentation Summit conference this year, so we decided we’d hold our first annual meeting and officially launch the Presentation Guild while we – and you! – are there. The annual meeting will be on October 23 at 6:30 pm and our official kickoff is October 24 at lunch. We’ll be broadcasting the launch via live feed; watch it here. See you there!

Indezine.com is a Media Partner of the Presentation Guild.

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Have you ended up with a presentation that has linked files, embedded media clips, and so much more? And now you have been asked to copy the entire presentation and all linked files to a CD? A CD in these days? How ancient is that? OK, never mind. Let’s rephrase that question -- have you been asked to copy all the content to a folder, a network location, or a USB drive? Fortunately, PowerPoint provides the Package Presentation for CD option that can do this task for you, with just a click or two. In this tutorial, we will learn more about this amazing feature.



Learn how to package a presentation to a CD or a folder in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Friday, October 14, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Ida ShesselIda Shessel believes that every expert, speaker, and coach who leads a presentation, training session, or seminar can get their message across in a dynamic engaging way. For over 20 years, she has been teaching presenters from around the world in the fields of technology, finance, pharmaceuticals, government, and more how to engage their groups and create effective learning experiences. Ida is the author of several business books including Communicate Like a Top Leader: 64 Strategies Top Leaders Use to Engage, Encourage, and Empower Others. You can learn more at http://idashessel.com.

In this conversation, Ida talks more about the Outstanding Presentations 2016 webinar series.

Geetesh: Can you tell us more about your recent webinar as part of the Outstanding Presentations Workshop?

Ida: My recent webinar for the Outstanding Presentations Workshop was called 3 Mistakes Presenters Make that Keep Their Audiences Bored and Disengaged—and How to Fix Them.

The purpose of the webinar was to help presenters design and lead engaging sessions—from short informal presentations to training sessions, seminars, and workshops.

The first half of the webinar was about raising awareness of the following three common presenting mistakes.

Mistake #1 is ignoring the learning needs of your audience members

Why does this mistake happen? Presenters either don’t know about or ignore the needs, wants and likes of the people they’re talking to because they’re so focused on getting their message out.

Most presenters assume that they are standing at the front of the room in order to show off their knowledge. However, in reality, attendees are not coming to hear the presenter speak. They’re coming to learn something from the presenter. So, instead of being impressed with the presenter’s depth and breadth of knowledge, it’s more important that participants are impressed with what they themselves are learning and can confidently do as a result of the session.

Think back to a really good presentation you attended and then back to a really bad presentation you attended. Many of the things you liked about the first session and disliked about the second are a direct result of your learning needs, wants, and likes. In general, the learning needs, wants, and likes of your audience members are not all that different from yours.

Here are just a few of the things that participants in my workshops have told me that they like:

  • Challenging ideas
  • Practical uses for what they’re learning
  • Variety
  • An organized knowledgeable instructor
  • An opportunity to participate, e.g. discussion, hands-on-practice, brainstorming
So the key to avoiding mistake #1 is to do some quick research. Ask people what they’ve liked and disliked about past presentations they’ve attended. Then use that information to plan an effective session for your audience.

Mistake #2 is too much focus on platform skills.

Platform skills are the presenter’s performance – voice, word choice, and body language.

Performance skills are important, but too much emphasis on them puts the focus on the speaker. Where should the focus be? On the most important person in the room – the audience member. Without the audience, the speaker is speaking to an empty room!

Rather than a presenter of information, think of yourself as a facilitator of learning. Sharpen your facilitation skills and spend more time:

  • Encouraging participation
  • Asking more questions
  • Guiding attendees in analyzing and thinking critically
  • Reinforcing and debriefing learning
  • Providing feedback and coaching
Mistake #3 is poor session design, and it happens as a result of the first two mistakes you’ve just learned about. What does poor design look like?

  • Too much information dump (lecture)
  • No interaction, discussion, or exercises to process and reinforce learning
  • No practice and coaching
  • Poor or no materials or media, e.g. slides, handouts
  • No organized structure (e.g. road map, formula, numbered system of steps)
Why does this matter?

You have to remember that people are overwhelmed with information these days. It’s coming at them from many different directions. They don’t need more. If we want to make a long-term impact, then we as presenters have to break through all that “noise” and design our sessions in a way that our audiences can understand the significance of our information and apply it to their work or personal lives.

Avoiding These Mistakes

So how do we fix or avoid these mistakes? During the second half of the webinar, I introduced the 5-step Rock the Room Road Map. This is a template I created for designing and leading sessions that get and keep participants’ attention, make learning stick, and help participants implement what they’re learning in your session. It’s based on the concept that you as a presenter are a tour guide leading your audience members on a learning journey.

Step 1: Preparing for the Trip

  • Know your audience members
  • Develop your objectives, key points and sub-points
  • Plan how you will carry out steps 2 -5
Step 2: Starting the Trip (the audience members are assembled in front of you)

  • Establish a positive learning environment, e.g. set expectations, create a comfortable environment both physically and psychologically, provide the agenda and objectives
Step 3: Navigating the Road

  • Present the points using a variety of techniques
  • Orchestrate participation and active learning
Step 4: Staying on Track

  • Use reinforcement techniques
  • Debrief the activities
Step 5: Arriving at the Destination

  • Re-confirm and finalize the learning
  • Wrap up and link out to “What’s next?”
The Rock the Room Road Map infographic is available for free download by going to http://idaspeaks.com/rr-roadmap

Outstanding Presentations 2016.

Geetesh: How do you engage audiences? If there’s just one advice you had to give to someone who has to present in the next 15 minutes, what would that be?

Ida:The most important piece of advice I can give someone is to spend time exploring the audience’s understanding of "What do I do with what you’re telling me?"

You want to have a long-term impact on your audiences – create raving fans so that they come back to you for more and refer you to others. The best way to do that is to ensure they know how to use what you’re sharing with them. Leave enough time to discuss the following questions at key milestones during your presentation.

  • How does knowing this information benefit you?
  • How do you think you can use this information?
  • Are there any modifications you need to make for your own circumstances?
  • What support do you need in order to implement this information?
If your audience is large, have your participants gather together in groups of 4 or 5 people to discuss the questions above. Then, conduct a large group debrief and have a few spokespeople summarize their group’s discussion. Hearing how others interpret your information and its usefulness is a great learning for both you and the rest of your audience.

Be sure to give your audience members opportunities throughout your session to practice using and getting feedback on the information you’re sharing. Depending on the topic, you can give them hands-on-practice, a small case study, or a problem-solving scenario. Since you’re an expert in your topic, you should easily be able to draw situations from your experience. Alternatively, feel free to ask the group to suggest a realistic situation in which your information can be applied.

Interaction is the key to audience engagement.

Get permanent access to the 2016 Outstanding Presentations Workshop

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Once you have inserted an organization chart (org chart) within PowerPoint 2013, you might need to change the layout of the org chart. The "layout" means how the subordinate levels in the hierarchy branch out from top to bottom -- probably you want all subordinates flushed to the left, hanging to the right, or distributed evenly across a horizontal plane -- you will learn more about how this works in this tutorial.



Learn how to change the layout of your organization chart in PowerPoint 2013.

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Thursday, October 13, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



After inserting an Organization Chart (org chart) in PowerPoint 2013, you might need to add more shapes to your org chart. The default org chart that PowerPoint places has a few shapes. However, you might want to add more shapes, as well as newer hierarchy levels for the new shapes you add. Fortunately, you can make these additions and edits with just a click or two. Follow these steps to start adding more shape(s) to your org chart in PowerPoint 2013.



Learn how to add more shapes to an existing Organization Chart in PowerPoint 2013.

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Wednesday, October 12, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:45 AM IST

Nancy DuarteNancy Duarte is CEO of Duarte, Inc. and the author of several best-selling books on presentations and communications. Her latest book, Illuminate: Ignite Change Through Speeches, Stories, Ceremonies, and Symbols, co-authored with Patti Sanchez, shows how the world's greatest leaders use powerful communication to move people and ideas forward. She has a passion for teaching others about the power of persuasive presentations to drive change in the world.

In this conversation, Nancy discusses her keynote at the upcoming Presentation Summit 2016 series.

Geetesh: You deliver the opening keynote at this year’s Presentation Summit where you will speak about Illuminate. Can you give us a curtain-raiser introduction to Illuminate? Also, what takeaways can attendees anticipate from your talk?

Nancy: When presentations are coupled with stories and ceremonies, leaders can ignite change more effectively. As one of the largest presentation firms, I’ve had to learn this the hard way and I will be sharing personal stories about my shop, my wins and losses as a leader and how fired up I am that so many in the room believe presentations make a huge difference in the world.

Illuminate Keynote by Nancy Duarte

Geetesh: Nancy, not only are you a renowned author, but you run Duarte, a company that works with messages, slides, and delivery coaching. I am sure you do so much more. How do you prioritize what needs to be done, or do you just have the freedom to do whatever you want to do?

Nancy: I’ve surrounded myself with a rockstar executive team. It took me a long time to figure out my role as CEO. There’s no job description for one. So, I spend my time five ways: as investor, inventor, ambassador, teacher, and student. Now, I’m slowly delegating some of that. As an entrepreneur, there are always plenty of responsibilities to get through each day but I have been able to carve out for myself working on things that play to my strengths and energize me. I work long days that have meetings scheduled in 15 to 30 min increments but because I enjoy what I do, it doesn’t feel like a burden. Also, it helps to try to listen to TV while I e-mail in the evenings and pretend I’m not working. My weekends are kept free for me to hike, contemplate and then do it all over again.

See Also: Nancy Duarte on Indezine

Presentation Summit 2016

What is the Presentation Summit?

For many years now, Rick Altman has been hosting the Presentation Summit, a highly popular event that is geared towards users of PowerPoint and other presentation platforms.

Date: October 23 to 26, 2016

Location: Green Valley Ranch, Las Vegas, United States

Register now!

Twitter Hashtag: Presum16

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posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Ellen FinkelsteinEllen Finkelstein is a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP, a recognized expert, speaker, trainer, and best-selling author on PowerPoint, presentation skills, and AutoCAD. Her articles have appeared in numerous magazines, newsletters, and blogs. She is presently running the Outstanding Presentations Workshop 2016 series, her webinar series that allows everyone to learn from renowned presentation experts.

In this conversation, Ellen talks more about this new webinar series.

Geetesh: After so many years of the Outstanding Presentations Workshop, what if I asked you to rewind back to the past ones, and share your thoughts about all these series through the years? Can you share some thoughts?

Ellen: The main thing has been the quality. I didn't know how the presentations would turn out, but year after year, presenter after presenter, I've seen such high-quality presentations, with valuable insights and clear, powerful slides. I've received great appreciate from audience members, too.

Outstanding Presentations 2016.

Geetesh: Why do you think people sign up for the Outstanding Presentations Workshops? And what are their takeaways?

Ellen:Outstanding Presentations Webinar 2016 presentations offer a lot of variety, so they take away a wide range of points, from technical to strategic. My takeaway is that presenters want to learn. They care about their audience and want to do the best job of presenting that they can. Of course, I get those people since they take the time to register and attend. Their questions show a great deal of intelligence and discernment. Over the years, I've met many wonderful people by doing this series; it's been very uplifting!

Get permanent access to the 2016 Outstanding Presentations Workshop

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



Have you ever been in a situation where your presentation looked so awesome with some amazing typography, but when you opened the same presentation on another computer, the text looked positively terrible! This behavior may happen if the font you used is not available on the other computer. The best solution to this problem is to use safe fonts that are available on most computers, or you may also explore the option to embed fonts in your PowerPoint presentation.



Learn how to embed fonts in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 10:00 AM IST

Widescreen slides are becoming the norm, and it is getting difficult to decide which slide proportions you should use for your next presentation, especially if you have no control over the projection environment. We explore this area in our Should You Create Widescreen Slides article. We also get you another foundation-level article--about differences between bitmaps and vector graphics.

In the Tutorials section, PowerPoint 2013 users can learn about moving shapes within SmartArt graphics, converting SmartArt into individual shapes, and formatting text attributes within SmartArt. PowerPoint 2010 users can learn about hiding and unhiding slides, and exporting presentations to video clips. Finally, do not miss the new press releases and templates of this week.



Read Indezine's PowerPoint and Presenting News.

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Monday, October 10, 2016
posted by Geetesh on 9:30 AM IST

Jake PechtelJake Pechtel is the Strategy Lead for TechSmith’s popular screen recording and video editing desktop software, Camtasia. He has an extensive background in marketing and branding, as well as mobile games and applications.

In this conversation, Jake discusses how you can record live presentations using Camtasia.

Geetesh: Presenters always want a way to record their presentations—at least the slides and their narrative if not their body language. How can Camtasia help them achieve this objective?

Jake: Camtasia can help people record their presentations in several ways. Many people record a pre-existing presentation, front to end; while talking their viewers through the slides. Camtasia’s core capabilities help presenters quickly and easily accomplish this. For PowerPoint specifically, Camtasia can operate as a plug-in, allowing presenters to initiate their recordings from within the PowerPoint application.

Camtasia also allows you can select any portion of your screen, your entire screen (or even a secondary screen connected to your presenting machine), and start recording it with just a few clicks. In addition to recording the screen, Camtasia can use the system microphone to capture narration.

We think it’s important to be able to make a human connection with your audience when creating a presentation or knowledge transfer recording. Camtasia can use your webcam to capture the presenter during the recording. That webcam video can be overlaid onto a part of a recorded presentation for a picture-in-picture effect. The webcam is recorded as a completely separate track for use in the Camtasia editor, so it can be removed for parts of a presentation. This allows you to keep body language, facial expressions, and personality in your video, which is often important for viewer engagement.

Camtasia includes a video editor, built for people who need to create the video, but aren’t video professionals. So it’s very accessible for presenters who have little to no video editing experience. Removing errors, trimming dead space, removing ‘ums’, adding callouts, highlighting specific content… it’s all there. Camtasia removes the pressure of the perfect one-take recording and gives presenters tools to help draw their viewers’ attention to key information in the recording.

Recording Live Presentations with Camtasia

Geetesh: Jake, are there any specific hardware issues that this approach for recording presentations with Camtasia would entail, and can you share recommendations and tips?

Jake: For most recordings – especially for presentations to be shared internally with a team, or a small group of viewers, the microphone and camera on most laptops are perfectly suitable (some devices are better than others of course). If you are planning to record a lot of presentations, or high stakes presentations that go to a large audience, picking up a decent USB microphone is a wise investment. You might have a great presentation with plenty of relevant content, but if the audio is poor quality or hard to understand… viewers will flee almost immediately.

Overall, creating a basic presentation recording can be easily accomplished without an additional investment by almost any current generation system. Of course, the more you dive into Camtasia - adding tracks, effects, imported videos, or annotations, the more complex the project becomes, and the more system resources it requires to keep the experience smooth. However, presenters will be able to create some excellent videos with the machine they are using today.

See Also: Snagit 13: Conversation with Chris Larson

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posted by Geetesh on 9:15 AM IST



You won’t find an option to add an Organization Chart in PowerPoint 2013’s Insert tab of the Ribbon. Instead, you will find the SmartArt option in the Insert tab, and organization charts are just one of the many variants of SmartArt graphics you can insert into your slide. An organization chart graphically represents the management or hierarchical structure of an organization. If you want to illustrate the reporting relationships in your company or organization, you can create a SmartArt graphic using the Organization Chart variant.



Learn how to add an organization chart in PowerPoint 2013.

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