Making PowerPoint Interactive: A Webinar

Created: Thursday, June 6, 2013, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 4:00 am



Making PowerPoint interactive is to make your slides do what you want, allowing yourselves to go from slide to slide almost like going from one room to another in your home — and setting your slides in a way that allows you to work better — again, that’s akin to arranging the furniture in your home so as to make movement and work easier. Even if you step out of the comfort of your home, you can make your life more gratifying by discovering streets that are not too crowded with traffic so that you can get to your office faster, and with less stress! In the world of slides, those streets are the shortcuts you press to quickly navigate from one point in your presentation to another – and back.

Yes, interactivity is certainly as simple as the examples provided — and it also requires enough patience and practice to master. Once you do master interactivity, the results are worth it — you will be resoundingly successful in everything you do, and certainly will make a great impression while presenting!

Presenting imitates life in many more ways -– including the 3 elements that make up interactivity in our PowerPoint slides:

  • Anchor,
  • Action, and
  • Result

These three elements are present wherever there is interactivity! They play a vital part when you click (action) on a button (anchor) on your slide to launch (result) another application altogether. But look at these everyday examples that have nothing to do with slides – but they do include these 3 elements (these will be explained in a webinar I discuss at the end of this post):

  • Playing a computer game
  • Painting on paper
  • Conversing with someone

How slides imitate life is not important because we need to learn how to imitate — rather, it’s important because we no longer have to imitate. We do these tasks every day that use interactivity — that’s built inside us from the day we were born, and there’s no reason why we cannot use this natural interactive ability with our slides!

Interactivity in life is something that we take for granted. We never take a second look — it’s just there like you unconsciously change gears while driving or push away water while swimming. It’s the same with your slides — interactivity works best when it appears effortless.

But there still are preset directions for efforts — you always push away water while swimming rather than drown yourself in it. Interactivity with slides has three such directions:

  • Built-in: Interactivity that’s part of PowerPoint — you need not add it — it’s already there!
  • Internal: Interactivity that has to be added — this is similar to our analogy of arranging the furniture in your home.
  • External: Interactivity to external links and programs — this is quite like our analogy of being aware of shortcut streets that get you from your home to office faster.

All this and more will be explored during a webinar called Making PowerPoint Interactive that I am doing on June 11th, 2013 — you will learn about:

  1. Anchors of all Types: Built-in, Inserted, and Invisible
  2. Linking Everywhere
  3. Best Practices for Interactivity
  4. Linking to Added Interactivities
  5. PowerPoint as the Glue

Looking forward to seeing you at the webinar! This webinar is being organized by Harbinger, the folks who create Raptivity applications. The webinar is being held on June 11, 2013 at 11 am India time (this time, we’ve chosen an Asia Pacific friendly time).

Categories: powerpoint, presentation_skills

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