Learn PowerPoint 2010: Build and Sequence Animations

Created: Thursday, May 17, 2012, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 3:45 am



Animation is movement and a fine art at the same time — using animation’s powerful capabilities of attracting attention, you can effectively illustrate a concept, a process, or anything else. However there’s a thin dividing line between mere movement and utter confusion. Imagine a training session where the presenter moves around the room explaining a concept — as he or she moves, the eye of the audience members follows him or her. There is a clear focus in the room, and the subject of that focus is the presenter. Now imagine another situation where the presenter and all the audience members in the room start moving in disparate directions just for the sake of movement — at this point of time, the movement has given way to chaos. The distinction between movement and chaos works similarly on PowerPoint slides — at any point of time, movement needs to have focus and direction, and more importantly, a reason to move!

Learn to build and sequence animations in PowerPoint 2010.

Categories: animation, powerpoint_2010, tutorials

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