Hot and Cold Diagrams in PowerPoint

Created: Thursday, April 10, 2014, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 4:00 am

Updated: at



We already showed how you can create distance cartograms using concentric donut shapes within PowerPoint. But that was only the beginning because it turns out that you can create so much more with the same shapes!

Tip: You can get ready to use Distance Cartogram shapes!

Look at this example of a hot and cold diagram that we found in the April 2014 issue of Inc. Magazine — notice that this tells you which celebrity is more tech savvy than others. Understandably, Ashton Kutcher is more tech savvy — so he is right in the center of this cartogram structure in the hottest zone. Around him as you travel to the edges of the cartogram, the tech savvy quotient gets colder — and you find many more celebrities here.

Hot and Cold Cartograph from Inc.
Tip: Click the above picture to see a larger representation.

So what are we trying to tell you here? We are saying that you should try something out of the ordinary all the time. Try and reinvent diagrams and use them in different visual situations — just like the above example that uses a cartogram structure to create a hot and cold diagram!

Tip: Want some ready to use Distance Cartogram samples? Try our Distance Cartogram PowerPoint templates kit.

Categories: diagrams, graphics, powerpoint, presentation_samples

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