Applying Theme Colors and Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac

Created: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 4:59 am



Applying a new Theme to a PowerPoint presentation completely changes the appearance of all slides in the presentation. This change happens because a Theme influences the Theme Colors, Theme Fonts, Theme Effects, Theme Backdrops and much more. However, there are circumstances when you really don’t require such a complete makeover or metamorphosis. In that case, you can still change only Theme Colors and Theme Fonts and leave all other Theme attributes unchanged.

Applying Theme Colors and Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac

Learn how to apply Theme Colors and Theme Fonts in PowerPoint 2011 for Mac.

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